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Shakadula

Thread repair kits

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Hi Everyone, I recently installed a new fuel pump in my GS and the right bolt hole in the block is stripped. I can get a little traction but can't torque to spec. Anyone ever used Loctite thread repair with any luck?

I have a strong gas smell and although I can't see a leak, I suspect I have one at the fuel pump. Any suggestions would be very much appreciated as I want to drive my car without fear.

Thanks

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Probably a 5/16 bolt. Max torque recommended for that size bolt by LocTite is only 45 INCH pounds. Plus there is the cyclical stress of the pump arm. Better consider a heli coil or other thread repair system..........Bob

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Thanks Bob. I will research the Heli Core thing. Right now I don't know if I should smoke it, drink it or dance with it!

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They work well the trouble is you will need to drill the hole bigger, thread the hole with a special tap and install the insert with a special tool. Could be a problem if you don't have room to work. If there is room probably cheaper if you can find someone familiar with them to do the job for you..............Bob

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Hi Everyone, I recently installed a new fuel pump in my GS and the right bolt hole in the block is stripped. I can get a little traction but can't torque to spec. Anyone ever used Loctite thread repair with any luck?

I have a strong gas smell and although I can't see a leak, I suspect I have one at the fuel pump. Any suggestions would be very much appreciated as I want to drive my car without fear.

Thanks

Well, the first problem you have is that there should be NO gasoline leaking from the fuel pump-to-block joint. The opening goes into the crankcase, so any fuel you smell either means that the diaphragm in the pump is leaking or you have a fuel leak unrelated to the stripped thread. I believe your Buick uses an aluminum front cover, so the thread goes into the cover, not the cast iron block. Heli-Coils are easy to install if you have the room to drill the hole and tap it. If not, you'll be removing the front cover, at which point you MIGHTASWELL do the timing chain also... :D

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Joe, you are correct in that the pump in in the timing cover and I have never tapped alum so maybe I leave this to a pro. Bhigdog, good to know about the heli stuff for future reference.

Thanks all.

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Helicoil thread repair kits are expensive. About $45 for each kit depending on size and each kit works on only one size thread. Properly installed they are stronger than the original threads.

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Helicoil thread repair kits are expensive. About $45 for each kit depending on size and each kit works on only one size thread. Properly installed they are stronger than the original threads.

Where the heck do you buy parts? Kits in this size range 5/16 to 3/8 run about $17 on line. Google is your friend.

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Guess I was recollecting wrong. We have maybe a dozen kits of different sizes. The larger the size the more expensive. After you have the kits additional coils are inexpensive.

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All the years I have been repairing threads I would NEVER use Helicoils! Reminds me too much of a slinky. Keenserts are the way to go. Google them for the best price.

In the future if you want to tap aluminum use a 2 fluted tap. 3 & 4 fluted taps don't leave enough clearance for the chip to break so it "drags" it thru your new threads.

Bill

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I prefer Helicoils over Keenserts because the Helicoil uses a smaller tapped hole, which can be better when you have a thin cross section. I'd also rather remove a Helicoil than a Keensert! I've installed thousands of both with good success.

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I prefer Helicoils over Keenserts because the Helicoil uses a smaller tapped hole, which can be better when you have a thin cross section. I'd also rather remove a Helicoil than a Keensert! I've installed thousands of both with good success.

The reality is that both insert styles have their place. As noted, Helicoils require a smaller diameter hole, which is important if the hole being repaired doesn't have a lot of edge distance. Keenserts have the advantage of the locking tabs, so they absolutely will not back out when you remove the bolt. This is a big problem on Helicoils, especially if you are using locking Helicoils.

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For those who prefer solid thread inserts, Time-Serts are a good alternative. Especially nice in spark plug bores.

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