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1946 PACE CAR?


themagicisback

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The reason I ask is because my vin# on the front frame rail looks like this "I - - - - - 2". The rear vin on the frame rail reads I-5-3. My vin# on my title reads 7H153572. Are my vin numbers just deteriorated that bad and if so how can I remedy this? Or is it the Holy Grail "I ndianapolis 2". HAHA! I'm dreaming! Where the "1" should be it does look like a "I" instead of a "1". Is the "I" roman numeral for the number "1"? Check out the pics and let me know what you think.

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Here's a pic of my progress.

post-98711-143142490324_thumb.jpgPrevious body work was done in LEAD!

post-98711-143142490327_thumb.jpg

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The "7H" on the title would indicate a 1947 model year and would mean the car was produced after the 1st of November 1946. Check with the Benson Ford Research Center to determine what vehicle had the "7H 153572" serial number and matches your car. I believe the "1 ndianapolis2" reasoning is a bit of a reach. If the description of the car for the serial number matches your car I think there's enough evidence to go ahead and re-stamp the missing characters. It appears that perhaps rust/corrosion erased the missing characters? Your title serial number indicates this was a fairly early production car and probably would have had 1946 trim items such as : "winged" hood ornament, hub caps with "hexagon" centers and instruments with dark gray background. My understanding is that Bill Stroppe who prepared the '53 road race Lincolns also prepared the '46 pace car(s). This would have been done in early 1946 before the big race. I think it was assumed that he did some "internal" engine mods to give these cars some much needed extra oomph.

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The "7H" on the title would indicate a 1947 model year and would mean the car was produced after the 1st of November 1946. Check with the Benson Ford Research Center to determine what vehicle had the "7H 153572" serial number and matches your car. I believe the "1 ndianapolis2" reasoning is a bit of a reach. If the description of the car for the serial number matches your car I think there's enough evidence to go ahead and re-stamp the missing characters. It appears that perhaps rust/corrosion erased the missing characters? Your title serial number indicates this was a fairly early production car and probably would have had 1946 trim items such as : "winged" hood ornament, hub caps with "hexagon" centers and instruments with dark gray background. My understanding is that Bill Stroppe who prepared the '53 road race Lincolns also prepared the '46 pace car(s). This would have been done in early 1946 before the big race. I think it was assumed that he did some "internal" engine mods to give these cars some much needed extra oomph.

Peecher,

MAHALO for all the great info! I'll give the Benson Ford Research Center a call.

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I think peecher meant (if you had the original engine block) then the serial number would be stamped at the back on the block in front of where the trans. connects to the block.

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Actually , Dee P. is correct - The serial number is NOT on the engine block , but is stamped into the TRANSMISSION.

There is no serial number on H-V12 Engines. (Maybe Those in the know back then anticipated frequent engine

replacements) ...........?

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Actually , Dee P. is correct - The serial number is NOT on the engine block , but is stamped into the TRANSMISSION.

There is no serial number on H-V12 Engines. (Maybe Those in the know back then anticipated frequent engine

replacements) ...........?

The number is also on the frame near the gas filler neck hole. I recently found mine while stripping the paint off the chassis. Top of transmission if it is the original transmission frame near motor mount and rear of frame. Benson Ford research will give you the original build sheet copy for $20. Lee

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Could it be that NO engine number number stamped on the block meant that the servicing dealer didn't have to submit paperwork to change the owner's title to reflect the new engine number. Quicker and easier to just substitute an factory authorized rebuilt inexpensive engine. Been told this by a couple of "oldtimers."

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At a LZOC show in Reston VA years ago I saw a 1942 Lincoln Custom that belonged to a Mr. Zimmerman(?) that had a serial number on the block just in front of the cylinder head. At the time, many questioned how and why when no other engines had a serial number. It was thought that in some states an engine number was required and that the dealer or later owner might have put a number there rather than explain to DMV why there was no serial number for the engine.

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I called Benson Ford Research and I'll receive something in the mail any day now. The vin# on the transmission reads H177319. Again the "1's" look more like "I's" and the 9 may be a 7, not sure. I can't wait to get the info about the car! I'll keep everyone posted.

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Yes, it will be interesting to find out what those numbers show. The H177319 is a "1948" model year number and might indicate that it was a replacement especially if the S/N was for something other than a Continental Cabriolet? By the way, the style of the steel stamps used on these cars is such that the "1's" do look like capital "I's (eyes). Capital "I's" were not used in any Lincoln H series cars to my knowledge. The "vehicles" belonging to those 2 serial numbers should hopefully solve the mystery.

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I got the INFO and posted a picture! Of course, a couple questions follow. :) Was the "Sheldon Gray" color part of the interior or exterior? It say's "Leather, Red" but was it 2-tone w/ Sheldon Gray? The hand written part looks to be "Top Material Black". Kind of dumb question but does that mean it came with a black top or a black headliner? What are "Chrome Bands"?

post-98711-143142516032_thumb.jpg

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Yes, it will be interesting to find out what those numbers show. The H177319 is a "1948" model year number and might indicate that it was a replacement especially if the S/N was for something other than a Continental Cabriolet? By the way, the style of the steel stamps used on these cars is such that the "1's" do look like capital "I's (eyes). Capital "I's" were not used in any Lincoln H series cars to my knowledge. The "vehicles" belonging to those 2 serial numbers should hopefully solve the mystery.

Mystery solved! The stamped numbers are deteriorated. The I is a 1. The engine and transmission were changed. The card says it came with a 2 speed warner but I have a 3 speed w/ OD.

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The number is also on the frame near the gas filler neck hole. I recently found mine while stripping the paint off the chassis. Top of transmission if it is the original transmission frame near motor mount and rear of frame. Benson Ford research will give you the original build sheet copy for $20. Lee

I got the build sheet from the Benson Ford Research Center. THANK YOU!

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Sheldon Gray is the exterior, Red leather would be all of the seats. If it was two material it would be a special order. Chrome bands are the beauty rings on the wheels. The overdrives were made by Warner.

PS I spent two years at Schofield Barracks with the 25th Division courtesy of my Uncle same. I am surprised that a vehicle could last 60 years or more in that damp area.

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Sheldon Gray is the exterior, Red leather would be all of the seats. If it was two material it would be a special order. Chrome bands are the beauty rings on the wheels. The overdrives were made by Warner.

PS I spent two years at Schofield Barracks with the 25th Division courtesy of my Uncle same. I am surprised that a vehicle could last 60 years or more in that damp area.

39 pickup is correct on the exterior Sheldon gray, all seats and sides were red leather, the convertible top was black canvas with the inside color( tan top bows match the tan color.) Overdrive was referred to as 2 speed regular or overdrive, three on the column low, second and high. Then at 35 you could .go into overdrive high. I had a Sheldon gray Continental coupe with a blue leather and blue Bedford cloth interior. Lee

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39 pickup is correct on the exterior Sheldon gray, all seats and sides were red leather, the convertible top was black canvas with the inside color( tan top bows match the tan color.) Overdrive was referred to as 2 speed regular or overdrive, three on the column low, second and high. Then at 35 you could .go into overdrive high. I had a Sheldon gray Continental coupe with a blue leather and blue Bedford cloth interior. Lee

Hi Lee,

Do you happen to have a paint code for Sheldon Gray? My paint guy called Dupont and they couldn't find it. Also, do you have a picture of the Sheldon Gray Continental? Thanks!

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I have the paint code but it will be the week end before I'm at the warehouse. No photos but it was refered to as Sheldon Gray Metallic. Sparkled in the sun. Lee

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According to the LCOC restoration manual the code for the 1946 Sheldon Gray exterior paint is M14137.

Hi, John Murphy

Thanks for the reply. My paint guy called DuPont and they couldn't find Sheldon Gray. After, 2 hours on the phone and several books of searching she found 1 cross reference book where it was hand written in "Sheldon Gray", but no formula. :( I'm striking out. Do you have any contacts or any more info about this color?

http://paintref.com/cgi-bin/paintdetail.cgi?wtcode=14137

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The Internet and Google never ceases to amaze me. I Googled "paint code for 1946 Lincoln Sheldon Gray" and up comes the desrded information...Seems like Ford's also used Shendon Gray for their cars in 1946. The info listed three manufacturers.......Ford code is 1413, the Ditzler PPG code is 30081, and finally Dupont lists 34885. The paragraph also list the same numbers for Ford. Hope this helps.

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Be very careful if you use paint chips to find a color. I have a 1946 LC coupe that was originally Skyline Blue Metallic.The car had been repainted years ago and the color on the car was more of a dull, flat gray than a blue and I could see no metallic in the paint. The paint chips that I had were the same. The inside of the glove box door still had the original decal telling what oil to use and the proper PSI for the tires. The color was so bad that I decided to change color to maroon and bought the paint. When I tore down the car I discovered the original color under the shifter that was bolted to the steering column. The Skyline Blue Metallic was a beautiful color, unlike what was left on the car and the paint chip. Colors of that day are difficult to replicate because in the day, the effects of UV light was not understood/solvable.

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