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WHICH EARLY THIRTIES COUPES HAVE ROOM FOR 6 FT 4 235 POUND PERSON


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I AM LOOKING FOR A EARLY 1930S COUPE WITH GOOD LEGROOM AND HEAD ROOM. MISSED A WIILLYS KNIGHT ON EBAY . ANY SUGGESTIONS ON WHAT COUPES WOULD BE A GOOD FIT FOR ME . DO NOT HAVE A BIG BUDGET. THANKS

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With most cars of that era. I have found the problem not to be leg room but "stomach" room behind the steering wheel. 235 sounds big to some people, but I when weighed 245 I could drive my 1940 Ford coupe with no problem. I'm not 6'4 but somewhere over six foot. I was also an avid weight lifter so I had a good distribution of my weight { i.e. not much gut }. At 6'4 245 I feel the leg room would be the concern { unless all weight is in the stomach }. As I said leg room is not generally the problem. Just get in some cars, check them out and see how they feel. Don't be in a hurry.

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Don't even consider a Model A Ford if you are tall or big in the girth ! I have a 1929 Model A Ford Cabriolet and a 1929 Model A pickup truck Roadster ( open cab ). Instead of trying to squeeze in the drivers side I usually get in the passenger side and slide over and exit the same way. I can squeeze in the Cabriolet but my 6 foot 1 father in law is confined to being a passenger. One advantage is they are unlikely to get stolen by a tall person ( lol ) !

Wayne

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Kaufman Thuma Keller weighted 320 pounds. He joined Chrysler as vice president in 1926, became president in 1935 and chairman of the board in 1950. As long as he worked there, Chrysler built cars that big men could drive.

I'm not surprised that Ford products were for thin people, Henry Ford was skinny as a rail.

In the early days Porsche executives were all on the short side and the 356 reflected this. So did Lotus, Colin Chapman was on the small side too.

If you can find a car company run by someone with a figure like yours, the cars will seem tailor made.

This does not apply so much today when all cars seemed to be designed for some "average" person but it does on the older models.

If you are bigger than an average japanese, japanese cars are not for you. On the other hand, German and Swedish cars always seem to have enough room, even the old VW beetle would accommodate a 6 foot plus driver. Even Porsche 911 and subsequent models have room for 6 footers.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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My remarks here may not be of much benefit to you, because they're based on my limited knowledge of coupes. I learned a little something from my '36 Dodge and Plymouth coupes that I've always found somewhat interesting. They were designed in such a way as to maximize the cargo room in their already vast trunks. The coupes employ a shorter steering column drop than do sedans. This raises the steering wheel somewhat and places the driver incrementally closer to the dash. I've driven many pick up trucks and I'm quite sure that the same is true for them, in that cab space is slightly diminished in favor of longer load area. I don't know if there is anything that you can extrapolate from this because I'm not suggesting all manufacturers use this technique of steering wheel positioning (especially earlier in the thirties). I guess that I bring it up thinking that maybe if you have your find some particular coupe that you really like, it might be worth considering some inconspicuous modification to the column drop or seat track to accommodate your particular needs. Good luck in your search.

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As for Model A's being a bit confining extended seat legs are readily available that will set the seat back 2".

2" might not sound like a lot but it is.

Even at 5'11" I find leg room to be lacking a tad and 2" made a huge difference.

http://www.mikes-afordable.com/product/A47902EXT.html

Wouldn't the package tray in the coupe keep the seat from moving farther back?

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I am thinking this would likely fit the bill, depending on where it goes from here in the next few hours:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Chrysler-Royal-CD-1931-chrysler-coupe-cd-8-/171299940758?forcerrptr=true&hash=item27e245a996&item=171299940758&pt=US_Cars_Trucks

The Model "A" talk reminded me of my '30 tudor, plenty of room in there (once in) for the "portly shirt cut" guy - with the seat moved back. Forward, I would get the famous "Model A smile" or black ring on the gut of your shirt from the steering wheel - meaning:

1) Model A drivers are happy people

2) Time for a new steering wheel

3) Some of us could stand to skip the burgers and dogs at the next meet... ;)

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A model A fordor sedan has plenty of room............... the cars and trucks mentioned regarding A do not. I have a 28 phaeton and am 6'1" and 230, very difficult to get into. Not so with the 4 dr sedans I've had.

consider the body style. Yes Buicks and Packards have good room, but the man said he's on a budget................... so off brand should be a consideration.

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Mercer, if one is willing to look at "off brands" I do think you can save a lot of money - heck you can find some larger non Ford stuff for "Model A Money", even in a more desirable body style than a sedan which OP I think is less interested in.

As of this AM that Chrysler coupe has 3 hours or so to go and I believe bidding is at $22,700, of course the last 10 minutes are what will matter. In any event anything under $30K or so for a big coupe like that ready to roll sure seems like a sound deal to me. Bear in mind that budget is a relative thing, this example is expensive compared to an "A" for example, but could represent a LOT of car for the money compared to a Packard of the same year.

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Steve. I agree with you ...but remember that repairs and replacement parts are far more expensive. Replacement parts are some times impossible to find whereas with the likes of a Model A they are a telephone call away. I recently has a Chrysler part fabricated in a machine shop because I could not find it used in more than 9 months. A ten dollar part was $400. I own both Chryslers and Model A's and as Steve says budget can surely be a point to weigh when making your decision. Good luck, I hope you get the perfect or near perfect car. If money is no obstacle of course go for the Chrysler !!

Wayne

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Thanks, Anyone know anything about this particular car, would this model have legroom and headroom and is this a decent price . how hard is it to get a car out out of Canada? sent the owner a email

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Good luck on the Chrysler or whatever you pursue bln!! FWIW I think the Chrysler is around $10K underpriced now but still sitting @ $ 22,700 as of a few minutes ago. Your a winner anywhere under $35K on that one, IMHO.

Al, I agree with your comments completely. Non Model A cars of the same vintage can present some hassle in terms of keeping 'em on the road (at least relative to an "A" ) and unless a hot brand, can take longer to sell. I could see us getting another "A" - I like roadsters, wife likes pick ups. I am not sure how well I would fit in a pickup as I understand they are tight.

We used this logic in the selection of a "T" for the speedster build vs. a larger chassis which may have been cool, but perhaps next time.. The "T" I can get anything for, and it is simple/small enough/documented enough in terms of repair guides, etc. that I can actually build the car largely at home.

Update: Chrysler sold for $24,699 IMO, a great buy.

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)
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