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ybshore

1926 Chrysler 58 sedan

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I have the opportunity to pick up a very clean mechanically but tattered interior-ly '1926 58. What do the members think of the car in terms of reliability, rideability, etc. Oldest car I've owned is a '55 New Yorker Deluxe. Based on his description and the groups knowledge, what is this ol'girl really worth? THX.

From the owner: About the car, roughly 90 percent original, only missing a few window crank handles, one repaint about 50 years ago; interior is all there but tattered, floorboards are original and mint, including under rear seat where BUDD BODIES is stamped in, looks brand new. Small amount of rust in very edge of tail pan cowl panel. Underneath of car is excellent, frame is mint, no rust or scale. Running driving last year. Always stored in garage. This winter flushed gas tank and sealed, rebuilt vacuum fuel pump, rebuilt original megaphone horn, rebuilt- polished carb, flushed motor, new oil pan gasket, new points, plugs, wires, etc... Haven't had time to install rebuilt parts. Avid reader of Hemmings Motor News, haven't seen one for sale in 5 years of reading . So I think pretty rare? Also in this condition

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I would say pretty rare. I am a Chrysler fan but never had one that old. In those days Chrysler named their cars by the top speed, indicating a top speed of 58 MPH or a little more. Call it a cool 60 lol.

Correct me if I am wrong but I think the 4 cylinder models were more or less a hold over from the Maxwell - Chalmers days. This was the only 4 cylinder Chrysler, and it was their lowest price model.

Should make a nice car if you do not demand too much. Tooling around at 30 - 35 MPH fine. Don't expect much more than that. But if everything is in good shape it should be a reliable car. I have faith in Chrysler engineering and in the quality they build into their cars. One auto expert said if you examine them piece by piece, every part on a Chrysler car looks like it cost more to make, than the corresponding part on its main competitors. This was in the fifties but I suspect it goes for the twenties as well.

You will have to be the judge of condition, and whether the car suits you, whether the price is right etc. But, if you want a car of that age that is a cut above the Ford Model A or Chevrolet class, the Chrysler is a good choice.

I would call the condition #5 "restoreable". According to Old Cars Price Guide it is worth $3500. Or maybe #4 "good" $5840. Probably more like "good" in spite of the interior wear.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)

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I had a 1926 Model 58 four door sedan that ran like a top and would do about 45.....without a top or two doors on one side. It was blue with black fenders and was restored by a dealership in Royal Oak, Michigan. It was stored outside of the dealership and the snow sat on top. I got it after the driver's side door wood and the roof let go. It started right up when I bought it and had the original vacuum tank fuel system. It was a really fun car, but the steering was very stiff. May have been that way because of sitting for so many years......here is the only photo that I have of it....and, YES....I drove it in that condition.

post-37352-143142468504_thumb.jpg

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These were nice driving cars. The 4 cylinder cars came standard with only rear brakes, hydraulic 4 wheel brakes were an option. As for the top speed, the model number would indicate the top speed for the heaviest body so the open cars were somewhat faster. The one thing to look out for is the condition of the wood in the body.

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