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Joe S.

Car w/inline 8 used in old mine jury-rig?

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This can be found at the site of the old Western Mine in Ida Canyon in the Huachuca Mountains of southern Arizona. The car appears to have been cut down and transported to the mine site, where the engine was jury-rigged to a winch to power a cable hoist for ore cars. Though the design of the radiator shell (missing its badge) is distinctive, I haven't been able to identify it via image searches. There is a strip of chrome trim at the back of the hood. The engine is an inline eight, and the spark plugs are clustered rather than evenly spaced, as follows: xx xx xx xx

The mine was sporadically active during the 1900-1920 period and perhaps a little beyond...

Anyone recognize the radiator shell?

Thanks in advance,

Joe S.

post-100235-143142464848_thumb.jpg

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1930 Dodge DC. It was the most expensive car produced by Dodge in 1930 and only 234 buyers were found. Those parts might be worth dragging out of there.

Update: My bad. ONly 234 phaetons were built. The Eight was a very low production car, nonetheless.

Edited by West Peterson (see edit history)

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Last words he said as he left the mine, and the Dodge. "Here is the crank, crank it yourself if you want it started." I'm finished with this mining business."

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Just to inform....there were 20,315 four door 1930 DC8 sedans built. Correct about the phaeton production. There were 598 roadsters. There were 2,999 coupes and 728 convertible coupes built in 1930.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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1930 Dodge DC. It was the most expensive car produced by Dodge in 1930 and only 234 buyers were found. Those parts might be worth dragging out of there.

Update: My bad. ONly 234 phaetons were built. The Eight was a very low production car, nonetheless.

Thanks! I'm a hiker and encountered these remains last month, and have been curious at to what exactly the miners had cannibalized for their impromptu hoist. As for dragging parts out of there, the location of the mine is high up the canyon wall at the top of a daunting series of switchbacks, and getting myself and my day pack up and down was plenty work in itself! Beyond that, the remains are probably covered under some historical artifact law or another, so one would want to check with the Coronado National Forest first. The road that the miners created to reach the property has been obliterated, so it would be strictly a hand-carry operation!

The existing literature about the mine suggests it was inactive after 1920, but the presence of the cut-down 1930 Dodge tells me otherwise.

Thanks again.

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Thanks for sharing, Joe. Sounds like Keiser might be in luck again for spare parts! The ghost of Death Valley Scotty is following you, friend

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Another view. The miners cut away most of the body and perhaps the back half of the frame. Hard to tell as the remains of the car are now deeply buried in mine tailings and leaves:

post-100235-143142465371_thumb.jpg

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