Sign in to follow this  
1941

How many H-V12 equipped cars have their original engines? Not many I'll bet

Recommended Posts

After four long years, I am ready to put A H-V12 Engine in my 41 Continental. not THE

engine, but an engine.

Before first acquiring the car from my dad's estate, it had been shown many times, always

with the words "original engine" in the description.

In 2010 , after I pulled the engine to rebuild it, and after reading George Trickett's excellent

piece on dating engines, I realized that my '41 had a '46 block. It was at this point I realized

that the engine number is stamped on the bellhousing of the TRANSMISSION and nowhere on the block itself.

After finding out the block was beyond (in my mind) repair, I sought out a "period correct"

block.

I bought a "1941" block from the late Jim Edison , which turned out to be a 1942 Block (not his fault), which I then proceeded to rebuild, using the 26H heads which came from the old 1946 block.

In conclusion , I believe that very few engine blocks remain in their original cars, simply because without regular maintenance, the engines wore out quickly. Also, the heads

probably are not the ones that came with the block when it was built.

And THEN there is the hunt for the rear transmission mount for a 40-41 WITHOUT the borg-Warner overdrive!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 48 is still running its original engine, has been rebuilt once but still running strong. all the parts are still original except the intake which is now an edelbrock 2x2, still have the original intake and the front brakes and master cylinder, fronts are now discs and a dual port MC for extra safety.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not many i bet either, Lincoln had an exchange program for these that was popular as one could expect

as they were very much elite lux cars..These engines obviously had a short life for the most part, yes, some went

many miles..but the oil, the roads, the tendency to lug around in 3rd gear caused sludge and death..add to it a war and no new cars for

over 3 years made them stay on the road longer than otherwise..My car had 52000 miles on it when I found it in 75, clean nice engine

with dual carbs, aluminum heads and a 10 inch crack all along the water jacket, and it came from Dixie..oh well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first Continental came to me with a Cadillac engine. I am sure that Cadillac Olds and Ford flathead engines saved many a Continental and a few clean Zephyrs. MY second Lincoln had 5 cracks in the block between the cylinder and the intake valve . My third Lincoln got a rebuilt V12 because I had the engine and needed a car to put it in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Familiar story, when my '40 Cabriolet was purchased in 1952 and it already had a Merc flathead V-8 engine installed and the gentleman that I bought it from yanked it out and put in a, brand new from the factory, 1953 Lincoln 317 cubic inch Y Block (he also added dual exhaust). It currently has about 3000 miles on it but will be replaced with a correct V-12 with aluminum heads. In a way I hate to replace it because it runs so well...stopping is the only problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My father dropped a '49 Merc V-8 into my '41 in 1950. Now I am running a '42 V-12 (based on the silver painted cast iron heads marked 26H), but who knows? Anyone want a complete, running '49 Merc engine? Before I found the V-12 I planned to put it back in and bought an NOS fuel pump, rebuilt the carb, reseated the valves, and installed new valve seals and gaskets.

Off the subject, Commander Cody played Hot Rod Lincoln at our local venue tonight. Still bugs me they changed the lyric to "V-8."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can sell that Mercury engine on the Ford Barn. The Merc 4" stroke crankshaft is worth $500. and if the block has no cracks and you have the starter carb dist etc, that can be worth another $500 +

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reading this thread is making me real nervous! I was told my 47 has a 48 engine that was rebuilt in 1984 and running until it was stored. Just pulled the engine and tranny out last week. The engine is frozen but I would like to rebuild it, if possible. The number on the engine is 6H A31622 B2. Where's the best place to find info to rebuild this motor properly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The numbers that you give are casting numbers that have a meaning only to the foundry when the block was cast. Many have tried to find meaning in the numbers, but the code has long been lost. It maybe that the 6H may mean 1946, but we cannot be sure. If you are tearing down the engine, check the bore and the rod journals to compare them with post war and pre war sizes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hawaii, your Lincoln V12 rebuild manual is on Ebay right now. See ebay 400676711748 for rebuild information. Contact Earle Brown for your mechanical parts for your needs. Merv Adkins will be of great help also. Both listed under "sources" on the LZOZ web page.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 47 has the original engine, rebuilt. The story on the car is that it had a V8 for some years and the V12 was kept to re-install later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As luck would have it, after pulling the tranny, the numbers on it match the numbers on the frame. How to find out if the engine itself is original to the car remains a mystery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I doubt if you will ever find out if it has an original engine. Engines were constantly changed....cheap Factory offerings. You just replaced damaged gears in the tranny...lift out and put in new parts...not the whole tranny...simple. If numbered engines were replaced, titles had to be change to reflect new unit. Dealers happy. Less paperwork., It was sinple operaton and cheap and you got an engine with currect modifications. From the outside...the same engine...inside with new moving parts. Your car was back on the road again....quicker and you were happy with the new power.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Murph. I think you are right, none of us can really know if we have an original engine - there is a reason the engine

number is on the transmission and not the engine. Engines were designed to be replaced. Maybe that guy in Florida with

the 40 Continental coupe with 590 miles, still has the same engine...Id bet on that! Pictures of my 40 L-Z Brunn

engine...it might be original with low mileage (40,000) but who knows as even it had been rebuilt in that mileage frame.

Redid the valves with Earle Brown's help, advice from Dee Peecher, Tom, Overfield, Mssr. Bwatoe and others...it runs again!!!

post-67972-143142446385_thumb.jpg

post-67972-143142446379_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tom its a stock Zephyr engine without polished heads unlike your Custom. The Brunn is reference only to body type

which is "36" or town car with open chauffeur compartment. Your Custom is body type "32". Post some photos if you can, I used to own some 41 Customs when I was a youngster and would love to see them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim - Nice hot air heater ; and better yet nice blue color on the car!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

H-V-12 is Z Jims only true love, although I know he has had a brief fleeting affair with Henry's

v-8..which I'm hoping he re visits eventually........

The Brunn is the subject at hand...it is a 40' as are the other girls in the j-z stable...

this car was built on a o6h-76 unfinished chassis...stock l-z no acorn nuts.

Good show jim...this poor Brunn had doors falling off, poop in the engine compartment ans 2 feet all around it..

City boys with pitch forks digging it out, now It could possibly see the raod this summer! WOW

go jimmy go. and i bet it is the original engine! as the car saw limited use...chauffeur driven .......thanks

for saving an important part ofo Edsel Ford legacy!

Edited by Mssr. Bwatoe (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim could you please post some pictures of your Brunn or direct me to where they are posted? Is it Capri Blue? You have aluminium heads because it is a '40, correct? Thanks for showing the engine, I am trying to put together a hot air heater and that is a good shot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ron, Here is a photo before restoration efforts. It was originally dark maroon with black roof and windshield - Edsel Ford ordered 3 of the 14 in this color. I will return it to that original paint scheme. If you look carefully, you can see the maroon on the fender. Yes, aluminum heads for all HV-12s 1936 thru 1941.

post-67972-143142447877_thumb.jpg

post-67972-143142447868_thumb.jpg

post-67972-143142447873_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, what a neat project. The reason I asked about the color was the car sitting in the background of the engine.

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The car sitting in the background is Randolph Scott's 40 Cabriolet - the last Capri Blue 40 Continental delivered through the Long Beach Ford Plant. The photos below show him taking delivery. The pic in my avatar is Randolph Scott at his friend Jack Heath's Ford dealership with Merv's car, O6H-56-1, which was on an eastcoast tour introducing the new

Continental model in the Lincoln-Zephyr line.

post-67972-143142449683_thumb.jpg

post-67972-143142449687_thumb.jpg

post-67972-143142449081_thumb.jpg

post-67972-143142449342_thumb.jpg

Edited by Jim Zephyr (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 48 LC convert was in the same family for 35 years. In the mid 50's, it was taken to the Lincoln dealership and a new overhead valve engine was installed. How do I determine the year of the engine it now has?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, posted some pictures above of R. Scott Lincoln - then and now. You didn't really want to see some pictures a fifties V-8 conversion did you? Might have original engine, its got cast iron heads but still has the acorn nuts - 42,000 miles on the meter... doubt it could be untouched, good compression but smokes a bit.

post-67972-14314244969_thumb.jpg

Edited by Jim Zephyr (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this