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1932 Hupmobile Engine


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A lady from California called the shop inquiring about the engine for her 1932 Hupmobile with a straight 8 engine.

The left side has casting #C46-25440.

On the top of the block the number is 1-314574-1.

It has a Chrysler generator and an Autolite starter motor.

There is also a C46 stamped on the block.

I sent an email to her and hopefully we'll get some pics.

ANY information will be greatly appreciated....... :)

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Hupp produced 6 different models in 1932 with 8 cyl, engines. Models C, H, L, U, F and I Hupp having their own foundry, produced their own engines. If you have not, ask the lady for the serial #, that will tell you the the model number. From the model #, you will be able to find the engine cubic in. displacement. Hupp did use Autolite starters & generators on a lot of the 1932 models. My tec. books are not here in our temporary home so, when you find out the model, I can tell you who is the tec. person in our club. He may be able to answer some of the questions you have.

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Wow, first a guy comes up with a 1933 Hupp Victoria Coupe, now i am looking at a 1932 Model I Cabriolet Roadster. Beautiful car. You asked about the engine, while this is what it should look like. See pic This being said you will need to ask a Mopar man about it. I believe Chrysler 8 cyl. but i am not a Mopar guy. I think Keiser is the guy. He posts a lot on the Forum.

post-60296-143142437539_thumb.jpg

Edited by Hupp36
miss spelled word (see edit history)
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Wow, first a guy comes up with a 1933 Hupp Victoria Coupe, now i am looking at a 1932 Model I Cabriolet Roadster. Beautiful car. You asked about the engine, while this is what it should look like. See pic This being said you will need to ask a Mopar man about it. I believe Chrysler 8 cyl. but i am not a Mopar guy. I think Keiser is the guy. He posts a lot on the Forum.

The C46 in the Hupmobile is a straight eight 1949 Chrysler New Yorker engine. The engine numbers for the C46 New Yorker ran from #C46-1001 up to C46-28838. Whenever a part has the "DPCD" logo on it, it is a Chrysler Corporation part. I see that logo on the engine in question. The logo (for those newbies) stands for "Dodge, Plymouth, Chrysler and DeSoto".

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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You guys are the BEST....... :D

NOT being a Hupp engine but having Chrysler components made me think it might be a Chrysler engine but I'm in NO way knowledgable about engine specifics beyond the cars I own.

I have notified the party who made the inquiry and I hope to learn more...... :)

Just for a kicker here's a nice 1930 Lincoln....... :P

post-93523-143142438244_thumb.jpg

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Keiser, as the young folks say, " you da man". Would it be cool if that engine has a Warner over drive be hind the transmission like my 36 Hupp N does. Thank you for the help, I knew you would know what it was. I knew it was not Hupmobile. Chuck M

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K: Misunderstanding your reply above (it was late here; senior moment) looked in a couple engine parts catalogs (King Prod, 6-32 and 3-36) for commonality between CCptn and Hupp 8s (you did mean the 49 Chrysler engine was fitted to the 32 as a replacement??)...

Anyway, did note an oddity...

While I found no replacement part number commonality, there was a NOTE under some of the Chrysler 8s in the 32 catalog that they used a special narrow "L" shaped comp ring...and in the 32 catalog the same note was under the Hupp 1930-31 "C" original factory piston in the piston/pin section and under the 1932 #222 and #226 in the piston ring section ...(King did not furnish factory dupl pistons or rings for these narrow comp rings)...

The same parts co's 1936 catalog had that NOTE for the 30-32 C,H,U 8s (which apparently had some engines with original 1/8 width comp rings and others with the narrow .104 and .100)...and also showed various other 32-34 Hupp 8s with both 1/8 and .100 comp rings, as well as only with .100 comp rings, presumably "L" shaped but no NOTE shown, possibly because the parts co offered no replacement piston??

SO, QUESTION: did Hupp sub out some engines/pistons to CCptn, or was this special narrow "L" shaped comp ring a shared designer item, a coincidence, or what??

While not really a Hupp devotee, don't recall any mention of Hupp-CCptn connections...

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K: Misunderstanding your reply above (it was late here; senior moment) looked in a couple engine parts catalogs (King Prod, 6-32 and 3-36) for commonality between CCptn and Hupp 8s (you did mean the 49 Chrysler engine was fitted to the 32 as a replacement??)...

Anyway, did note an oddity...

While I found no replacement part number commonality, there was a NOTE under some of the Chrysler 8s in the 32 catalog that they used a special narrow "L" shaped comp ring...and in the 32 catalog the same note was under the Hupp 1930-31 "C" original factory piston in the piston/pin section and under the 1932 #222 and #226 in the piston ring section ...(King did not furnish factory dupl pistons or rings for these narrow comp rings)...

The same parts co's 1936 catalog had that NOTE for the 30-32 C,H,U 8s (which apparently had some engines with original 1/8 width comp rings and others with the narrow .104 and .100)...and also showed various other 32-34 Hupp 8s with both 1/8 and .100 comp rings, as well as only with .100 comp rings, presumably "L" shaped but no NOTE shown, possibly because the parts co offered no replacement piston??

SO, QUESTION: did Hupp sub out some engines/pistons to CCptn, or was this special narrow "L" shaped comp ring a shared designer item, a coincidence, or what??

While not really a Hupp devotee, don't recall any mention of Hupp-CCptn connections...

To simplify my reply....Someone has switched out the original Hupp engine with a 1949 Chrysler engine. There was no corporate connection between Hupmobile and Chrysler as far as I know. Hupmobile would never have referred to Chrysler as a replacement or upgraded engine. One of the owners did this exchange completely on their own idea, I believe.

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I need to respond to tell you how happy the owner and his daughter are about learning this about "their" car!

She wrote to say her Dad is so excited to finally find out what engine is in the car "MY DAD IS DOIN' THE JIG RIGHT NOW thinkin' he can drive his Hupp again !!!! UNBELIEVABLE !!! ....... ;)

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I need to respond to tell you how happy the owner and his daughter are about learning this about "their" car!

She wrote to say her Dad is so excited to finally find out what engine is in the car "MY DAD IS DOIN' THE JIG RIGHT NOW thinkin' he can drive his Hupp again !!!! UNBELIEVABLE !!! ....... ;)

Can you attach a video of the jig here?

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K: Many thxx for correcting my mental lapse on the all-too-obvious 49 engine...but you left me hanging on the "special narrow L-shaped compression ring" pistons question.

That 36 King Prod catalog (240 pgs listings) only shows that note under 27-33 Chrysler, 28-33 DeSoto, 30-34 Dodge and Dodge trucks and the abovementioned Hupp 8s...

Granted, parts catalogs are weak reeds to lean on; no rings are listed for some of the more obscure orphans, etc., so it's not a definitive source...

Yet, it would seem there's some kind of connection here; if not CCptn-Hupp then possibly both purchased pistons from a third party??

There's not a straight-across correlation: CCptn listings showed .094, .100, .107 and .114, while Hupp listings only show .100 and .104; the CCptn listings state "Chrysler/DeSoto/Dodge factory pistons', and the Hupp listings state "Hupp factory pistons"...

Could this've been one of those engineering ideas that didn't pan out, coincidentally tried by CCptn and Hupp independently of each other???

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Bud, just a little note, Hupmobile had their own foundry & produced their own engines. One of the neatest things they did , they used the casting # for the part#. One other, 1 have 9 different models of Hupps & all of them have Hupp stamped on the head & the block. I can not say if all the engines they produced does.

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K: Many thxx for correcting my mental lapse on the all-too-obvious 49 engine...but you left me hanging on the "special narrow L-shaped compression ring" pistons question.

That 36 King Prod catalog (240 pgs listings) only shows that note under 27-33 Chrysler, 28-33 DeSoto, 30-34 Dodge and Dodge trucks and the abovementioned Hupp 8s...

Granted, parts catalogs are weak reeds to lean on; no rings are listed for some of the more obscure orphans, etc., so it's not a definitive source...

Yet, it would seem there's some kind of connection here; if not CCptn-Hupp then possibly both purchased pistons from a third party??

There's not a straight-across correlation: CCptn listings showed .094, .100, .107 and .114, while Hupp listings only show .100 and .104; the CCptn listings state "Chrysler/DeSoto/Dodge factory pistons', and the Hupp listings state "Hupp factory pistons"...

Could this've been one of those engineering ideas that didn't pan out, coincidentally tried by CCptn and Hupp independently of each other???

I think that you will find that even though there was no real connection between Hupp and Chrysler, car companies were/are famous for trying some of the very same ideas. I don't know if the "L-shaped" rings were a Chrysler idea, offhand, but I would guess that when engineering is involved, word of mouth spread an idea that may have been shared....by idea only. I hope that makes some sense.

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Hupp36......I can assure you they are watching this and a parallel thread at another forum where, coincidentally, Bud contributes as well....... :)

On another note, a couple hours ago, I was informed by the lady her Mom passed away yesterday(?) so their joy at finally learning the poop about this engine has been severely tempered...... :(

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  • 2 weeks later...

My prayers go out to the lady as well. My wife picked up a book at a yard sale Chrysler Chronicle a wealth of information. The original Hupp engine was 103 Hp, the newer Chrysler engine 323.5 Cid 135 Hp. I am a purist but when it comes to finding the original engine that goes in that Hupp, its a hard thing to do. The production on those cars was so low they are better off leaving well enough alone. Its a lot easier to rebuild that engine than a Hupp engine. I am just happy to see that the car survived.My only hope is to make my 33Hupp roadster look half as good as this car.

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Thanks for the thoughts and information Hupp...... :)

Circumstances being what they are I haven't heard any more from her.

I'm sure it won't be long before her father gets interested in his Hupp again considering how tickled he was to finally learn about the engine!

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  • 3 years later...
  • 1 year later...
  • 1 year later...

The initial inquiry was pertaining to what you identified as a 1932 series I and I agree (straight grille, "cycle" fenders, trim strips on the rear fenders, louvers, etc.).  That's the "particular vehicle" and not the Chrysler or Lincoln, as fine cars as they are.  I ask because I have a 1932 Hupp I engine sitting in a crate in my garage that I got from California about 25 years ago from an attorney who said he tried having the engine rebuilt and was disappointed in its performance and finally gave up and had his brother put a "modern" engine in the car.  Wondered if this vehicle was the source.  And, NO, I have no interest in selling the engine.  Sorry.

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Thank  you  for  clearing  this  up. It  almost seems  that  you  may  have the  original  engine  for  the  car.  Question, if  you  have  had the  engine  that  long  and  not  used it, why  would  you  not  sell it?  Is  it  a replacement engine  for  a  Hupp  you  own?

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