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Guest BJM

1975 Riviera MN

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Guest BJM

http://minneapolis.craigslist.org/ank/ctd/4339311660.html

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With a 455 ci V8 engine with 4bbl carburetor and automatic transmission, this clean, original classic is ready for a cruise! It comes with power seats, windows, locks, brakes, and steering with telescopic/tilt, cruise control, climate control, rear window defogger, and an AM/FM radio with 8-track player. Interior is Lombardy cloth and vinyl. 52,092 miles.

Please contact us for more information on this vehicle. To see our other cars, trucks, motorcycles, and more, please click "more ads by this user" or visit our website, Route65Classics.com.

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I see that the dealer is asking $7995.

Looks like a good car--and a nice color combination.

I realize that Rivieras of this vintage aren't fully

appreciated, but I think it has a lot more individuality

than today's Buicks!

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Guest BJM

John

Thanks for bringing this one back up. I flat out love the 74-76 Rivieras, and there are a few of us fans out there. Rob? in Sweden? has one or two.

1st of all, these are nicely styled in the mid 70's era of 3 box. I like the 77-78 Rivieras too, but those can be easily mistaken for a LeSabre. These can't. The shape is one of the last great Bill Mitchell infused style. Not shared with the lethargic and bloated Toronado and Eldorado.

The Riviera defines it's edges with creases that bring the eye back to the cpnservative but sensual shape of, for instance, the taillights including the before it's time "3rd" light which functions as a safety measure and a styling tour de force. It's not about the light being off, but on, which catches the eye. And the grille, 00101_2G9XrxN32by_600x450.jpg

pays homage even to the 1940's and 50's Buicks while creating depth in it's subtle architecture. Not cookie cutter at all. The rectangular headlights were a new fad for 1975 and help change the direction of the Riviera.

Meanwhile, every 75 Riviera needs a set of road wheels to flesh out the side profile, and a person either embraces the 70's styling cues of the Riviera or they don't. In other words, you either love the half vinyl padded roof, the chromey bumpers and the windshield with hidden wipers or you don't.

The interiors were so well detailed. The dash was styled and executed for usage and color. Door panels started to take on 3 dimensions in the early 1970's (witness the boattail Rivieras door panels) but Mitchell really let the interior sylists go with the Riviera door panels

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Here you see Cadillac refinement without carelessness. Pleasant tones, fabrics and subtle use of chromium and faux wood - not over done.

And this car has only 52,000 original miles. Add this one to your collection, exercise it about 2500 miles a year and it would be worth it's weight in collector hobby smiles for 20 years. That is a good hobby investment in my opinion.

The bottom line is these were styled cars not cookie cutter exercises in blandness. I wish we saw more of these at car shows, not less.

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I like this generation as well, you don't see enough of them - meaning never. This appear to be a nice survivor, although I think I see incorrect center caps on the chrome road wheels. This one appears to have the large ribbed cone center caps which would only be correct for '66 thru '70. I think the "flat" silver caps with the stylized R would be correct for this car.

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Well said, BJM. I like the hood design. It resembles the boat tail design from the previous 1971-1973 Riviera generation. Very distinct. A very rare Riviera, indeed. I hope it finds a good home with someone who will take it to shows and display it.

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The dual high mount rear lights really make these cars. If I was a Riviera collector with more than one car a 74 GS Stage 1 or a 75 GS would be #3 on my list after my 66 and a 71/72. I doubt they will ever be very collectible but nice examples have always been scarce. All the ROA meets I've attended there is maybe 1 or 2 74-76s present and sometimes none.

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Guest my3buicks

I drove one of these back around 1980 fairly often. It was a great driving car. I have always been kind of soft on these, but in the last few years I have grown to really appreciate the styling of them. There was a gorgeous Red one with a white top and interior for sale in my area in the past year, and I drooled over it several times.

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BJM, you mentioned that you like the 1977-78 Rivieras too.

I think they are excellent cars, good looking and reliable--

and very much under-appreciated. If I had more garage space,

I'd get one.

An unusually high percentage of the 1977-78's seen today

are the black-and-silver "Silver Anniversary" editions, but the

regular versions are especially attractive to me.

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Guest BJM

John

I agree. These were nice looking cars too and interestingly were well engineered. The Buick 350 was still available and was an excellent choice for cruising. Matched to the numerically low rear axle, one can expect 15-19 mpg. Seems bad but as a collector car, not too bad. Nice color choices too available, I liked the "Burnet Sienna" which was a popular Buick color across the Buick line. Needs road wheels. I believe a lot of 77-78's were fitted with the four wheel disc brake option.

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