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Sludge in the Pan, Finally


Paul Falabella

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Got some time from shoveling, to start the oil pan de-sludging. Read several threads and I can see how dropping the the idler arm will afford some clearance,but the crossover pipe is pretty far forward where the pan tapers up. Will the pan not tilt down and slide out ? Is it really necessary to drop the crossover pipe.

Reason: Idler arm was recently replaced. Should come off easy. Bolts on pipe look like they are going to put up a fight.Leave it or warm up the PB Blaster?

Thanks

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Paul;I would say to take off the link and the cross over,that is what I did,the pump screen hangs very close to the pan floor and needs A bit more clearance than the cross over will alow,I would take the cross over off,might be A good time to check the manifold gaskets as well,I replaced mine,didn'nt have any trouble with the manifold nuts though.I did have sludge in the pan,and I cleaned the screen as well. For what it is worth(nothing)Erie pa. currently holds the "snow" record in the U.S. so far(over 100") would like to pass the torch to some other city if they would like to have it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Mark M

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Guest Rob McDonald

PAUL, I recently pulled the oil pan from under my nailhead and unbolting the idler arm from the frame was all that was needed. However, my Roadmaster has dual exhaust, so I didn't have a crossover pipe to deal with. My recent experience with exhaust pipes suggests forget about penetrating oil - get a portable little MAP/Pro torch (by Bernzomatic - under $40) to warm those rusty studs and nuts to cherry red. Much hotter than a propane torch and the most stubborn fasteners come apart like they were installed last week.

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Paul

I just did that job to replace the LH exhaust manifold. Nothing easy about it. Penetrants, heat, dremel cutoff, lift or service pit, your choice of words...

The most handy tool for this is a 9/16 universal impact socket, use with or without impact to remove the nuts at the manifold (don't rush those and risk breaking a stud, which will require removal of the manifold, which will risk breaking manifold to head bolts, which will require removal of the head...)

When you replace the bolts at the crossover to exhaust pipe don't use grade 8 like this ******* did...you will break tools before your break those (also anti-seize does not work on exhaust parts). I used stainless steel bolts and nuts...don't know if it will work, but sounds good :).

Willie

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For what it's worth buick man has always used a combo of a 2 - day soak of 1st penetrating oil of your choice with a little Marvel Mystery Oil applied as well and then let it sit. Then come back with the MAP gas as was suggested. Heat twice to cherry red and then start turning on the 2nd heating. Stainless steel bolts threaded into either ferrous cast iron, steel or even aluminum runs the very real and highly likely event of becoming oxidized and will gaul in the thread tap resulting in your stainless steel bolt seizing with a concrete effect which will require drilling out the bolt and re-tapping if anti-sieze past is not first used on the threads before installation. Why take that real chance. Always use anti-sieze paste on your threads.

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I dont know if this might work for exhaust manifold nuts or not, but it might be worth a try. I have used it, but the nuts on the Roadmaster had only been in place for about 10 years when I had to replace the gasket.

An old steam railroad "never seize" was a mixture of graphite and steam cylinder oil. I have taken locomotive parts off that have been in place for over 60 years and have sitting outside. Big nuts (1" bolts) came off easily and I could still see traces of the graphite. And they get hot.

Today I use graphite and 90 weight gear oil and it seems to work well.

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I dont know if this might work for exhaust manifold nuts or not, but it might be worth a try. I have used it, but the nuts on the Roadmaster had only been in place for about 10 years when I had to replace the gasket.

An old steam railroad "never seize" was a mixture of graphite and steam cylinder oil. I have taken locomotive parts off that have been in place for over 60 years and have sitting outside. Big nuts (1" bolts) came off easily and I could still see traces of the graphite. And they get hot.

Today I use graphite and 90 weight gear oil and it seems to work well.

Several clandestine trips to the MTA's Brooklyn storage yards has failed to turn up any Steam Locomotives.

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