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R W Burgess

Hot Rods Taking Over---NOT!

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I know we've about beaten this subject to death, but here's a viewpoint that no one has brought up. I have a documented "Hot Rod" from the early 60's. a '32 5 window coupe. Since I bought this car in 2000,I've redone the interior and added nostalgic graphics. There is interest from friends for me to compete in the new AACA Hot Rod Class next year. As you know, the Hot Rod Class cars are to be documented as built/modified at least 25 years ago. Now, please go to my web site, <A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/hot32rodder/waynes_way.html" TARGET=_blank>www.geocities.com/hot32rodder/waynes_way.html </A> and notice the two versions of the car. There is an "underscore" between waynes & way. The first picture is in 1978, with then owner, Rod Peters. The second is as the car appears today. For me to compete in the Hot Rod Class, I'd have to repaint the car black with yellow flames. I'd also have to replace the headlight stands, wheels, tires, 3x2 carburetors, and reinstall the rear fenders. I'm very happy with my car as it is today, and do not intend to change it back to the documented version. Rodders, being who they are, always changing, always improving, will not go back to old type restoration projects. That's not their style. That's why my '32 Ford will not compete in the new AACA class. That's also why you won't have Hot Rods taking over the AACA. I'd like to invite other documented cars of this new class to post examples here, so our members can see other examples before the new 2003 season begins.<BR> Wayne Burgess<P>[ 08-06-2002: Message edited by: R WBurgess ]<p>[ 08-06-2002: Message edited by: R WBurgess ]

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Sorry, I left a comma behind net site address. Try it again. Wayne<P>[ 08-06-2002: Message edited by: R WBurgess ]<p>[ 08-06-2002: Message edited by: R WBurgess ]

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I think the point was always that the hot-rodding faction is "taking over" the hobby in genreal, not the AACA.

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Thank you Wayne! Nice car, you obviously have a full understanding of what the new class is all about. I think the photos will help explain things to the other AACA members.

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Wayne, my younger brother restored a 30 Model A sedan back in the late 70's. The car was a first place winner every show. But you know something, he hated driving it. He decided to make a street rod out of it in 81. He went to every show with masking tape around the posts and top to show where he was going to chop it. All the old timers were having fits. They asked why he would destroy a nice original car like that. His reply was "I have to correct all Henry's screw ups." Since he rodded the car he's been across the country with it and now liives in Florida. You can't do that today with an original Model A. The people on the roads will run over you......Some people just don't understand that times change....and in this case, for the better.................

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SkyKing:<P>Couldn't agree with you more. Each era of automotive technology has its own needs, and who can deny that Ford and other manufactuers didn't do one HELL of a job of meeting each era's needs. As AMERICANS..I think we can be DAMN proud of what our technology produced...in ANY era.<P>However, who can also argue with the proposition that TIMES and people's NEEDS change. The Model "A" did one hell of a job of meeting the needs of the enviornment it was designed for. But..my lord...getting out on the Interstate in a bone-stock one..?<P>I do have a terribly unfair advantage over the average "buff" of pre-war ordinary cars...I have a classic...a REAL "classic"...meaning, a ultra large, ultra powerful "super luxury" car of the 1930's...so, since it was the "best of the best" of its time, its incredible mechanical superiority gives me a little more "room" to work with and still be "stock". All I needed to do to make it fit in with cross-country high speed traffic, was to change the rear axle ratio, so the engine, at Interstate speeds, is spinning at the rpms it was designed to do most of its work in. Packard Twelves had wedge shaped combustion chambers, roller tappets, copper-lead "insert" type rod bearings, full pressure oil filtering and cooling, so sustained high speed driving is duck-soup for these road locomotives. But..c'mon..folks, how could anyone pick on a guy with an old Ford or Chevrolet...for not wanting to be a road hazzard...(or..more realistically "road kill" if he ever got in front of a big semi..those guys CRUISE at over 80 mph on the open roads of the west).<P>Bottom line...let's keep a perspective...these cars are PRIVATE PROPERTY. Who amongst us has a right to tell someone ELSE what to do with THEIRS. I am NOT the curator of a public museum. I am a car buff..I own cars. Anyone who thinks they have a right to tell someone ELSE what to do with HIS car...well.....let's just say...the appropriat sentence ENDS in the word "yourself", and begins with a word that sounds similar to an eating utensil that is NOT a knife or spoon....!<P>Pete Hartmann<BR>Big Springs, AZ

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Well --- we had an interesting experience out here in Pony Express country today. Our local AACA Region had a tour to Ft Collins, CO., to visit the Budweiser factory and for dinner at a restaurant afterward. cool.gif" border="0<P>The tour cars consisted of a '20s Hudson, dbinger's 50 Chev convert, my '51 Chev Belair, a couple of cars like the Excaliber, and numerous '60s & '70s cars, <B>AND</B> one hot rod. A '48 Chev convert with a purple paint job to make a true antiquer drool. shocked.gif" border="0<P>And guess who had the mechanical problens when we got to Ft. Collins. Pretty is as pretty does! wink.gif" border="0rolleyes.gif" border="0 ~ hvs<p>[ 08-10-2002: Message edited by: hvs ]

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I agree, times do change. Materials improve. Performance expectations increase. Obsolete materials need to be updated.<P>That's why I'm preserving all my 1930's zepplin air mail stamps and 18th century colonial script by having them laminated in plastic. I'll be spraying my original Matisse painting with clear semi-gloss Krylon later tonight to improve it's aesthetic qualities <I>and</I> durability. I've spent the last few days scanning all my Dickens 1st editions so I can access them better. At least I can now burn them for their BTU value (that's what I did with the pieces I scrapped from my neighbor's woodie after I replicated the inferior wood pieces with pressed polystyrene). Unfortunately I did keep the wood stock when I converted my 1873 Winchester to semi-automatic fire. I can fix that later. First I have to pick up my wife's 1932 Longines art deco watch, whose movement I'm replacing with a more accurate Chinese quartz setup.<P>And I've been having a lot of second thoughts about my wife since I visited the <I>Hustler Superstore</I> here in Cincinnati and saw what new "performance" features exist on their "women".<P>Oh, and I know that this <I>is</I> America, but still--please don't criticize me for <I>my</I> decisions about <I>my</I> stuff! Thanks.<P> rolleyes.gif" border="0

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Hey Dave....<P>What have you thought about spraying YOURself with..to improve YOUR looks..?<P><BR>Pete Hartmann

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I'll tell you what Dave...You put both an original and a street rod Model "A" side by side for sale, and I'll bet you doughnuts to dollars the rod sells first, even at a higher price. People today want something practicle to drive....Take a ride to some rod national and you'll see what I'm talking about...all these people can't be wrong!

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Here I am trying to bring to light a serious subject, and Howard's nitpicking a few little glitches in the poor fellow's new Rod, Pete's making fun of us poor truck-drivers because we run over a car every now and again(Gosh! A man has to sleep sometime, you know), and then there's Dave talking about????, hell, I don't know what Dave talks about half the time, then again I don't have a dictionary like PeterG to look up them fancy words he uses. Wayne wink.gif" border="0

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I would also like to thank you for posting the two pictures. They bring back a lot of great memmories. When I first got my license we didn't call them hot rods. We were just trying to salvage what we could from junk yards to make something that would burn gas and get us from place to place. We all wanted a muncie or Lasale trany but heck I don't think any of us would have known we were looking at one unless someone told us. And motors, if someone could get it running that was good enough for us. We only new the words because we read them in car books of the day. <P>A buddy and I each had 37 Plymouths, one was a four door the other a coupe. Trouble was we only had one good engine between us. You guessed it, if we went on a date the engine went in the four door, otherwise is was in the coupe. We got pretty good at swaping. The bolts never got dirty and the tripod was always in place.

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Thanks rcirilli, That dating comment reminds me of what one old codger told me about suicide doors a few years back. Seems he and his buddy were double-dating, with him in the back seat with his flame. His girl gave him an empty bottle to throw out, so he just pulled the door handle, not exactly having his mind on doors. The wind caught the door,broke the hinges,and laid the door against the rear fender. No problem! They tied the door tight against the fender to the spare tire, and kept on sparking...uh, cruising. Since everyone was still in the mood, they didn't want to ruin the night. W. shocked.gif" border="0

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Skyking,<P>Not that this hasn't been posted before, but....<P>Park the Model A and the former Model A side by side for 15, 20, 25 years. Now what havew you got? <P>One's the same "classic" piece of automotive history rolleyes.gif" border="0 . Dated technology to be sure. Less than optimal performance certainly. Ignored by anyone interested in the least in comfort, style or performance. <P>Essentially, it's just an old, dead guy's antiquated dream. It will almost certainly be a parts car to be looted for someone's hot rod project. <P>The other one's a stock timeless antique, as interesting and fun then as it is today. smile.gif" border="0<P>Enjoy the wait! tongue.gif" border="0

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Dave, How come the Hot Rod that won the Oakland Roadster Show 50 years ago is worth well over $100,000.00 today,and the stock restored version won't bring $20,000.00 on a good day?

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Dave, if you park any car for 25 years, what good is having it?

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Skyking, where were you on the agoraphobia thread?<P>1937, what's the fourth place car worth (in the unlikely event that it still exists intact)? How about the Best of Show from the 1984 1st Baptist Church of Memphis 3rd Annual Car Cruise and Bingo Night? <P>In other words, just because the toilet Elvis died on is worth many thousands doesn't mean I'm about to sit on a kings's ransom myself.<P>Remember:<p>[ 08-12-2002: Message edited by: Dave@Moon ]

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Come on Dave, It's 10:30pm east coast. I just got back from an 1,100 mile trip to Erie, Pa. and back, and you want me to look through 2 pages of posts about "spiders"! <BR> grin.gif" border="0 I'm going to bed. I'm tired! Wayne shocked.gif" border="0<p>[ 08-12-2002: Message edited by: R W Burgess ]

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Dave, what on God's earth are you talking about??

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