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1927 Standard Six


TomB
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If all the planets align correctly, I expect the machine work to be completed on my standard six in the very near future. Accordingly, I have the following paint/finish question:

Does anyone know if the cast aluminum accessory housing was painted? If so, what is the correct color and finish (flat/gloss)? Just to be clear, this is the aluminum housing that the water pump, oil pump, generator, and distributor all bolt to on a '27 Dictator. All responses will be most appreciated.

Respectfully,

TomB

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If all the planets align correctly, I expect the machine work to be completed on my standard six in the very near future. Accordingly, I have the following paint/finish question:

Does anyone know if the cast aluminum accessory housing was painted? If so, what is the correct color and finish (flat/gloss)? Just to be clear, this is the aluminum housing that the water pump, oil pump, generator, and distributor all bolt to on a '27 Dictator. All responses will be most appreciated.

Respectfully,

TomB

This should answer your question.

post-30776-143142346272_thumb.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

Studeq:

Thank you for your response. While the R. Quinn photo you sent was very helpful, I have not yet figured out how to discern colors from a black and white photo. There aren't many people alive today who remember how these cars were presented from the factory 87 years ago.

I've spoken with several knowledgeable Studebaker people, and some tell me my engine was gray, others tell me it was green. I've heard that sometime during late 1927 model year production, the engine color changed from gray to green, and green engines were produced throughout 1928 production.

I need to know if anyone knows of this 1927 engine color change; if so, at what VIN and/or engine number did the change occur? I also need to know what color is correct for the bellhousing, transmission, and timing cover. Was all bracketry (for the accessory shaft, oil pump, and water pump) finished in gloss black?

All responses will be most appreciated. Thank you.

Respectfully,

TomB

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Tom,

This what I did with my Light Six based on old photos, analyzing the paint/finish on my original parts, analyzing the paint on the plethora of spare parts I have and wanting to be able to maintain a decent looking engine. It wouldn't surprise me that the consistency of what was painted which color coming out of the Studebaker factory wasn't exact either.

As best I can tell they just left the aluminum "as cast". For my aluminum parts I sandblasted them to clean them up but that leaves them with an unnatural flat finish that will show every mark and speck of dirt. I followed this up with a steel shot bead blast which yielded a very nice satiny finish that appears much like as cast. I put a satin clear coat over that which didn’t really change the sheen but provided some protection from dirt and oils.

As far as paint finish on the parts….you will find that most unrestored cars usually have little sheen if any on the engine parts. I’m not so sure that they were painted that way or that is just from the high varnish paints they used back then that would cook at the higher temperatures the engines run at, not to mention all the damage from the oils or cleaners. The spare Remy parts I have look to be at least a semi-gloss sheen. Looking at the 1927 Dictator photo in the post you can see some sheen on the engine parts which looks slightly less than that of the body (which doesn’t look all that glossy in the photos). I question the date that photo was taken as I do not believe that spark plug wire boots were used until much later, so that engine had already been baking the paint a bit. This is mostly just speculation so who knows for sure whether it was gloss, semi-gloss, satin or flat. I decided that the paint may have been gloss when applied in 1923 and I know a high gloss paint would be much easier to maintain on my car so I went with that.

The one compromise I had to make was what to do with the fasteners… they were just unpainted (post manufacturing) when assembled which usually leaves them somewhere between light gray and dark gray depending on post processing (usually drawn, formed, oil quenched and machined with oil) with not much rust protection. I really didn’t want to paint them because I know they weren’t originally, so I decided to just go with a black oxide coating after sand blast which leaves them dark charcoal to black in color. Then I applied Boeshield T7 to prevent rusting. I’m pretty happy with the results.

I wasn’t sure about the brass parts, so they got the satin sheen bead blast with clear coat.

Does it look exactly like it did when it rolled off the assembly line? Probably not, but without being there that day, I'm satisfied that it is close.

Scott

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Edited by Stude Light (see edit history)
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I think this question has come up before. Engine colour MAY have changed very late in 1927, but the exact time is difficult to determine because it had no impact on engine parts or performance so there was no serial number changeover date.

As far as gloss or semi gloss on chassis and engine accesories, some time ago I found a website which said that all automakers used gloss paint until the late 1930's when SOME of them began to change to semi gloss. The change was not universal until about the end of WW2. (I can't find that site now - of course :( ).

Terry

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