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Rooney3100

24FT FEATHERLITE GOOSENECK MODEL 4941 TRAILER QUESTION ( The goods and Bads)

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Hello, I was thinking of purchasing a 24FT FEATHERLITE GOOSENECK MODEL 4941 Trailer with 5200lb axles in the near future for hauling my 1956 Chevy truck and I was wondering if anyone on this forum Owns or has owned one in the past and how they liked it for Quality & towing there classic car and what vehicle they had or have for towing this trailer, How does the Gooseneck compare to a Bumper pull trailer, I have a 2011 regular cab 4x4 Silverado 1500 that I will try and pull it with......... I would appreciate any comments....Thanks Rooney3100

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Check the interior height, and the height of the rear door opening in relation to the height of your beautiful truck.

Also check the height of the internal wheel boxes to see if your doors will open over them.

Featherlite was always known as a reputable brand, and I almost bought one several years ago, but had Forest river custom-build one to my specs instead.

Good luck.

... but did I hear that they (Featherlite) were bought out by another company a few years back?

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Check the interior height, and the height of the rear door opening in relation to the height of your beautiful truck.

Also check the height of the internal wheel boxes to see if your doors will open over them.

Featherlite was always known as a reputable brand, and I almost bought one several years ago, but had Forest river custom-build one to my specs instead.

Good luck.

... but did I hear that they (Featherlite) were bought out by another company a few years back?

Hello Marty, good to here from you, I'm in the process of checking into the featherlite for my truck, as soon as my 2011 silverado's paid off, I want to get a trailer made just for the dimensions of my 56, the height is a definate add on, also the door on the side for getting out of my truck, I did here that the goosenecks have a towing advantage over the bumper pull trailers, I figured I would try a goose neck with the silverado I have now, if it pulls ok, I will keep the truck, if not, as soon as the trailer is paid for, I will definately get a diesel regular cab 4x4 for the longer haul for(Shows out west or east).........the place I'm dealing with is SLM trailers in whitemore lake Mi, there is only 2 dealers here in Mi...........They have been in business for quite a while, I talked with the owner and he seemed like a down to earth fellow, not your typical salesman........STEVE

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Hi Steve,

Your 1956 Chevy truck looks great, and your plan is sound.

You may be able to find a Featherlite (or similar) already built with the extras you would like, and most dealers will order one for you, built to your needs. The additional cost may not be much, and if you look around at other dealer inventory, you may get a better deal, especially if you can travel to pick it up - or the dealer can have it transferred if his inventory is costing him interest (Floor Plan).

The extra height, Driver-side access door, low-height wheel wells, extra lights in ceiling, walls, and floor (for tie-down in the dark), additional tie-down points, as well as 6,000 lb axles, winch, tongue jack are all very helpful in the long run.

Best of luck in your search.

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Steve, I applaud you choice of trailer. Featherlite has provided a good, well built trailer but may be a little on the high side for what you are looking to do. Don't get me wrong - it is always smart to buy quality. My concern for you is your choice of tow vehicle. Even adding the safety of a gooseneck or 5th wheel unit, they are most stable with a dual wheeled truck. Take a look at the towing capacity of your truck and start adding up what the trailer and load will add. I go back to a former site on this forum about what tow vehicle should I get and I will stand firmly on BRAKING as the single most important aspect of what you are going to do. A heavy half ton (1500) does not offer a safe braking capability for towing anything approaching a gooseneck/5th wheel trailer. Think long and hard before venturing into a trailer of this size and weight. Your truck will certainly pull it but stopping is another matter. When the day comes and you are going down a mountain or long descent and you find the seat covers in your abdomen you will understand what I am saying. Always buy to stop, not pull. Rob hattiesgarage@comcast.net

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I agree with Rob, you really need a dually but I wouldn't try pulling a 5th wheel with anything less than a 3/4 ton truck.

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Steve,

I've mentioned many times, that I find the 3/4 ton (2500 Series) Suburban to be the best all-around tow vehicle, especially with the bigger engine. That being said, in addition to the Suburban, I also use my Ford Excursion 4WD Diesel.

Both of these have the "Stopping Power" previously referred to, and give Lots better utility. You can safely stow gear, equipment, family, friends, and could even sleep in the back when you wanted to be close to your rig.

Personally I prefer an equalizer hitch behind a high-quality SUV, but not a little-bitty one.

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I have a the 2011 Silverado 1500 regular cab, I would like to have a featherlite trailer, the bumper pull trailer weighs around 3500 lbs for a 24ft, the gooseneck weighs around 4500lbs, my 1956 truck weighs around 3500lbs, my Silverado is rated at 9000lbs, I would like to travel when I retire to various AACA shows, should I put the truck before the trailer or the trailer before the truck, I can't afford both at this time, I figure I can get both the trailer and a truck to pull with paid for before I leave the working world, I was hoping I could use the Silverado I have for now if I picked up a nice trailer, would a 2500 series Silverado HD or a similiar truck do the trick with the braking? Marty I like to have a regular cab 8ft box pickup for hauling stuff around, but I will check into the suburban for towing and hauling, that does sound like a good idea......

What does everyone else on this forum drive with the same weight as my 1956 Chevy truck 3500lbs for long distant hauls? , especially in the west or eastern mountains.....STEVE

DSCN0470_zps7bf5b596.jpg~original

Edited by Rooney3100 (see edit history)

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Steve- I tow with an F250 SD for both open and closed trailers. When I got a brass car I soon realized I needed a closed traile. My firs tow with a borrowed trailer and my F150 made me understand real quick about pulling and especially stopping while towing. The F150 felt maxed out in both areas at times as we traversed the Poconos of PA in a November snowstorm. I got the 7.3 diesel Ford after hearing about how strong and reliable they are. I have not been disappointed, it will pull anything anywhere I think! I got the F250 SD platform for the braking. It has over twice the braking surface of an F150 and it has always been comfortable in any stopping situation I have encountered with it. Most times I think the trailer brakes could be off and it would not matter. I think the Super Duty has more brakes than a regular F250 but am not sure.

Buy for both, spend as you can. My father had a dually Chev for a 28 ft fifth wheel travel trailer and swore by it after trying a 1 ton Chev before it.

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Steve- I tow with an F250 SD for both open and closed trailers. When I got a brass car I soon realized I needed a closed traile. My firs tow with a borrowed trailer and my F150 made me understand real quick about pulling and especially stopping while towing. The F150 felt maxed out in both areas at times as we traversed the Poconos of PA in a November snowstorm. I got the 7.3 diesel Ford after hearing about how strong and reliable they are. I have not been disappointed, it will pull anything anywhere I think! I got the F250 SD platform for the braking. It has over twice the braking surface of an F150 and it has always been comfortable in any stopping situation I have encountered with it. Most times I think the trailer brakes could be off and it would not matter. I think the Super Duty has more brakes than a regular F250 but am not sure.

Buy for both, spend as you can. My father had a dually Chev for a 28 ft fifth wheel travel trailer and swore by it after trying a 1 ton Chev before it.

Thank you for the Information Avantey: I really want to get a Goose neck 24ft Featherlight trailer, I will try hauling it with my Silverado till I get it paid for and then I will move to a bigger and better hauler for the longer haul, especially in the mountains, I was hoping someone on the forum, would have a gooseneck they haul around a 24 footer and I was hoping to here from someone what type of vehicle they haul it with, I will wait and see if there are any more people that can comment....Thanks.....STEVE

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I'm with Marty, am on my third Suburban, two Chevrolets and one GMC, all 3/4 ton vehicles. I agree that a half ton isn't suitable for towing a trailer with a moderately heavy vehicle in it. Also, of course my opinion only, I like gas engines, and to tow properly in hilly or mountainous terrain a larger engine is needed.

I currently have a 2001 Chevrolet Suburban 3/4 ton with the 8.1 engine. Yes, it's older, but I bought it two years ago with 35,000 miles on it. The problem is that, if you want a gas engine in a Suburban, you have to buy used..they quit putting a big gas engine in these vehicles in 2006, I've heard due to overall gas mileage concerns for the brand. Yes, I get poor gas mileage when towing. No, I don't care (too much) as that's just the price you pay for power and size.

As far as stopping, good trailer brakes are a must, very few vehicles have brakes designed to stop both itself and a 6000-10000 pound trailer/load.

One last comment, where you tow is a factor also. I used to tow a trailer with a Ford Club Wagon, 350 engine, no problem....in the "flatlands" of Louisiana/Mississippi/Texas. I brought that vehicle to Virginia, and soon gave up, as any hill was a challenge.

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Steve,

I've had the pleasure of travelling with , and sharing trailer and tow vehicles with both Trimacar and avantey - both are my long-time friends, and we each have our own ideas - but we all agree that the heavier-duty vehicle is very important, especially with regard to handling and braking - and yes, trailer brakes are a must!

All three of us use either a Suburban or a covered pickup, and none of us use a Fifth-wheel, for varied reasons I'm sure. Using the enclosed area within your SUV or covered pickup is a big plus, and with a Fifth-wheel, all of that area is open to theft and to the weather. If you need utility, you have the entire contents of the trailer. Mine is a 24ft box (all aluminum) with a wedge/tapered front 30ft overall and weighs about 3400 lbs.

If you got a conventional trailer now you cold pull it with your pickup without having to remove the cover, and could use it later with a heavy-duty SUV as well. It would also be easier to re-=sell if you ever needed to get your money back, or to further upgrade. \

\Buy the best you can - first time around and you'll never regret it!

Best regards,

Marty

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I used to have a 2002 Chevy 2500HD 6.0L 4x4 which I absolutely loved. I used it to pull both my cars (all weigh 4000 lbs or more) and my 31ft Travel Trailer. In the flat lands of Michigan and Ohio it pulled very well. Once I hit the hills of KY, TN,GA, and PA, things changes very quickly. The truck had to work very hard. Now I have an '08 GMC 3500HD Dually Diesel and I couldn't be happier. My drive are much less stressful. I also get 14 mpg pulling 8000 lbs at 65 mph. Just something to think about.

I too love the 3/4 Suburban platform. You can buy the way get a 3/4 Suburban once again. But not with the 8.1L. I tried it out before replacing my Chevy 2500HD. The GMC with a bed cap works out very well.

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You could look for a low-mileage used 8.1L 2500 Series Suburban/GMC Yukon-XL

or an older Ford Excursion Diesel 7.3 (I've been told that they are far better than the newer/smaller 6.0)

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I pulled for ten years with a tag along. I switched to a gooseneck 7 years ago and wouldn't go back for anything. Still, tag along or gooseneck is a personal preference. I'm not saying a gooseneck is the best; I'm just saying it's the best for ME. I'll have to agree with some of the others on the tow vehicle issue. I pulled for 3 years before I bought my first dually. Again ,I would not go back to a half ton. While I love the stability of the dually, especially pulling the gooseneck; I feel that a 250/2500 series is quite adequate. About any truck will pull a load but what about panic stops, overall general stability and even routine braking? When it comes to towing, bigger usually translates to better and safer. Just my 2 cents worth.

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I have seen very few 5th wheel enclosed trailers used to transport vehicles. Many full time campers are using, gooseneck, 5th wheels but they always ues a 2500/250 or larger. about 4 years ago I talked with a man selling a 3 years old F-150 due to purchasing a F-250. His camper's weight had caused axe bearing failure and the final straw was when the axle broke. Keep in mind, the total hitch weight is directly on the rear springs and axle. The 3/4 ton pickup has a heavier suspension and brakes than a 1/2 ton. If you don't use a 5th wheel unit, my personal preference is a class 3 hitch with a set of equalizer bars and an anti sway unit.

I have pulled with an open trailer and car weighing a total of 5,000 pounds with my Chevy 1500 and 5.3 engine. I always hang way back in traffic for braking reasons. Additionally, I have towed with my brother's Dodge 2500 diesel. Coming across Ohio, on I-70, there is a 4 mile steep hill going east out of Wheeling WV. Traveling at 55, I don't think the diesel engine realized it was towing anything.

My brother & I each drove our trucks, no trailer, the 450 miles to Hershey in October. While diesel cost more than gas, it also gets better mileage. Surprisingly, our total cost for each truck was almost the same. If we would have been towing trailers, he would have been getting about 21 MPG while I would have been getting only 13 and spending much more. I drive the truck less than 2,000 miles a year and elected to go with a gas engine due to it sitting most of the time. Diesel is much better for towing and I have never seen a 1/2 to with a diesel engine.

By the way, the grades in the west will be longer and higher but not as steep as on the east coast. Neither one will be an easy trip coming down, you will definitely need an heavy duty transmission. You didn't say how long it will be till you retire. Have you considered getting a used closed trailer now with idea of saving for the 2500/250 truck and 5th wheel when you retire?

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Just a note: I'm sure everyone on this forum realizes that 5th wheel and Gooseneck are not synonymous. The 5th wheel is cumbersome and renders the bed of the truck almost useless for anything else without removing it. If you go with the gooseneck I highly recommend the B&W turnover ball. The ball is turned over in seconds to allow full, flat bed access.

Again; a matter of personal preference.

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I have seen very few 5th wheel enclosed trailers used to transport vehicles. Many full time campers are using, gooseneck, 5th wheels but they always ues a 2500/250 or larger. about 4 years ago I talked with a man selling a 3 years old F-150 due to purchasing a F-250. His camper's weight had caused axe bearing failure and the final straw was when the axle broke. Keep in mind, the total hitch weight is directly on the rear springs and axle. The 3/4 ton pickup has a heavier suspension and brakes than a 1/2 ton. If you don't use a 5th wheel unit, my personal preference is a class 3 hitch with a set of equalizer bars and an anti sway unit.

I have pulled with an open trailer and car weighing a total of 5,000 pounds with my Chevy 1500 and 5.3 engine. I always hang way back in traffic for braking reasons. Additionally, I have towed with my brother's Dodge 2500 diesel. Coming across Ohio, on I-70, there is a 4 mile steep hill going east out of Wheeling WV. Traveling at 55, I don't think the diesel engine realized it was towing anything.

My brother & I each drove our trucks, no trailer, the 450 miles to Hershey in October. While diesel cost more than gas, it also gets better mileage. Surprisingly, our total cost for each truck was almost the same. If we would have been towing trailers, he would have been getting about 21 MPG while I would have been getting only 13 and spending much more. I drive the truck less than 2,000 miles a year and elected to go with a gas engine due to it sitting most of the time. Diesel is much better for towing and I have never seen a 1/2 to with a diesel engine.

By the way, the grades in the west will be longer and higher but not as steep as on the east coast. Neither one will be an easy trip coming down, you will definitely need an heavy duty transmission. You didn't say how long it will be till you retire. Have you considered getting a used closed trailer now with idea of saving for the 2500/250 truck and 5th wheel when you retire?

Thanks For All The Info Everyone (Keep it coming), Huptoy, I have 7 more years to go to retire and that would give me the oportunity to pay for a trailer and a truck, I'm just not sure what to get first, I know what I can afford, I would like to get the proper truck size for towing, I'd like to get a Deisel truck, But I don't think that I can budget that, I will have to check into the possibilities, they are costly, especially New ones, I just hate to buy a used Diesel vehicle, It's nice to hear any and all comments, I"m sure all of you have went thru this, First the show vehicle, then the tow rig and trailer, I sure hope it's worth going to the Car shows.....I would really like for everyone to see my 1956 Chevy Truck....:)

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I would buy the truck first because it costs the most; then the trailer would seem "easy". But thats just me. Diesels are more expensive but do produce more power. However, there is no written rule that says you must have a diesel to tow. My first dually was gas. Yes the mileage was poor but for a trip every now and then I felt the money saved at initial purchase would off-set gas costs for a few long trips a year. The main reason people buy diesels is power and torque. But then when I had my gas truck I always got there and back same as I do with my diesel.

'

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Steve,

You don't have to break the bank. In fact, you can take your time and be on the lookout for a well-cared for pre-owned diesel - the older Ford 7.3 is still an excellent choice! That is what I did when I bought my 2000 Excursion a couple of years ago with 231,xxx miles on it. It had been used as a livery vehicle, transporting folks from the Tampa, Florida Airport to local hotels, and had never pulled a trailer. Sure it needed some repairs such as electric door locks, and later a front wheel drive hub, and then 70,000 miles later a computer, but has been very strong and very dependable.

These units are said to be good for at least 500,000 miles with good maintenance. Mine, with any luck, should get more than that!

That being said, we still use the 2002 Suburban 2500 to pull our trailer as well.

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Guest BillP

Over the years, I've had tag flatbeds, tag box and gooseneck box trailers. Tow vehicles have varied from Suburban 2500s to F250s (460 gas, V10 gas and 7.3 diesel) to Tundra 5.7 gas; all 3/4 ton rated. I'm no expert, but I have some experience.

A gooseneck tows and handles better but is heavier. It's also longer if you want to put it away for the winter. I never needed a dually; it would depend on your anticipated load. Unladen and without a trailer, a dually is stiffly sprung and awkward to drive around in; nearly every one you see has smashed rear fenders. A heavy 4 wheel (not 6) pickup would be suitable for your purpose and allow some reasonably comfortable use when not towing.

Properly maintained and intelligently loaded, a tag box trailer works fine for hauling cars and pickups.

I would get a heavier truck.

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Rooney,

If you check on the HCCA (Horseless CarriageClub) website, there is a truck and trailer package for sale that is less money than buying just a good truck. It is not your trailer of choice but a good unit and should have been well cared for by the recently deceased owner, a respected brass tour guy. Go to classifieds and cars for sale. It is not on hte AACA forum. Good luck, Rob hattiesgarage@comcast.net

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Rooney,

If you check on the HCCA (Horseless CarriageClub) website, there is a truck and trailer package for sale that is less money than buying just a good truck. It is not your trailer of choice but a good unit and should have been well cared for by the recently deceased owner, a respected brass tour guy. Go to classifieds and cars for sale. It is not on hte AACA forum. Good luck, Rob hattiesgarage@comcast.net

Thanks Rob for the info, that is a good deal, I almost bought a 2014 Chevy sliverado 2500 duramax yesterday from our local dealer and after talking to the mechanic I realized these Newer diesels are not good because of that DPF emissions, I drive short distances and that wouldn't work out good for me, so at this time I'm going to get other things paid off before I retire and find an older diesel truck and get a trailer the way I want just for going to shows, or I might just start next summer venturing out with the 56 and having fun with it on nice day's, I'm sure it will get attention were ever it goes, the depreciation value will be far less than getting a rig for going to shows for what little time it is shown on the field, but that rig you mentioned on the Horseless carraige site sure looks tempting, I'm not sure if it's in my budget at this time, I only have 2 1/2 years left to pay on my silverado, then I might shop around........STEVE

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Thanks Rob for the info, that is a good deal, I almost bought a 2014 Chevy sliverado 2500 duramax yesterday from our local dealer and after talking to the mechanic I realized these Newer diesels are not good because of that DPF emissions, I drive short distances and that wouldn't work out good for me, so at this time I'm going to get other things paid off before I retire and find an older diesel truck and get a trailer the way I want just for going to shows, or I might just start next summer venturing out with the 56 and having fun with it on nice day's, I'm sure it will get attention were ever it goes, the depreciation value will be far less than getting a rig for going to shows for what little time it is shown on the field, but that rig you mentioned on the Horseless carraige site sure looks tempting, I'm not sure if it's in my budget at this time, I only have 2 1/2 years left to pay on my silverado, then I might shop around........STEVE

I own and operate a semi truck for a living. I have owned the Dodge cummins in the past. My truck of choice is the Chevy Duramax diesel. I purchased a used 2011 single rear wheel 1 ton with 26000 miles on it. I did have issues at first with the DEF. Chevy got that issue resolved. I pull a 24' goose neck open trailer with mine. I must say that I have pulled a lot of weight with this truck. Besides having antique cars ( two 73 Vettes, 50 bullet nose Studebaker, 31 Chevy coupe ) I also own a very heavy 1935 John Deere Model D and a 1973 John Deere with a front end loader. No matter what I have loaded, there has not been another stock truck on the highway that can keep up with the Duramax in the mountains.

If you wait on buying a truck, I can let you in on how to save a bunch of money and still get a new truck with full warranty. If you wait until the new year model trucks come out and shop across the country for new trucks from the prior year you can save a major amount of money. I did not know this until AFTER I purchased my used truck. I can buy, right now, a brand new 2013 1 ton single wheel Silverado LTZ Duramax in Washington State for 47,000 dollars!

You will be very satisfied with the 1 ton single wheel truck!! I have had a few 1 ton duallys and I am VERY satisfied with mine.

Good luck!!!

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