Gary_Ash

1932 Studebaker Indy car build

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Back on April 7, I posted some photos of taking the chassis apart for painting.  I anticipated quick reassembly, but it didn't happen for a variety of reasons/excuses.  Anyway, all the chassis cross members, frame rails, and some small parts got painted gray at a local body shop.  I cleaned up the various other bits like shock mounts, engine mounts, spring hangers, etc. and painted them black, as well as the angle iron frame for the cockpit area.  Currently, all the pieces are scattered on the garage floor, looks a lot like a kit to "build your own Indy car".  Once that paint is completely dry and hard, I can reassemble the chassis and start fitting the body on.  Wray Schelin tells me it's too early to paint anything as I'm likely to scratch the paint during fitting, but I think I need to risk it.  Taking the car apart and reassembling it multiple times is a real chore. 

 

I've got the basics of the wire frame for the seating area started.  Fitting two people in only 32 inches of width is a little like modern airplane seats in "cattle car class".  Fortunately, I have photos of the seating area from both the blue #18 car and the green #37 car with the upholstery out of the way.  In #37, the battery is below a hinged door under the passenger seat.  Note that the original cars didn't have batteries.  One of the photos without upholstery revealed that Bob Valpey had cut a hole behind the passenger seat to reach in under the tail section - I wondered how I was going to assemble the gas filler and hose to the tank.  With that info in hand, I can finish the seating wire form and start beating more aluminum.  The belly pan and "wings" to support the tail will be the last sheet metal items.

 

Only four more days till the auction of #37 at Pebble Beach.  I was very fortunate to have that car at my disposal for photos and measurements for all these years.  Thank you, Bob Valpey and Pat Curran (Bob's caretaker of cars). 

indy car kit.jpg

cockpit frame painted.jpg

seating wire form.jpg

seat area 37.jpg

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You are right, it looks lit a 'kit" to me also.  However, I know the amount of work that you have invested to get to this point.  Keep up the good work.  I am anxious to see what the original Studebaker Indy car will bring at auction.  You are lucky that you did have a car in close proximity to be a guide as you proceeded with your construction project.

 

Al 

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Gary, I imagine that you saw that Bob's Studebaker Indy car just hammered at $1,000,000 (before buyer's premium). No idea who the new owner is but interesting to think that you and I saw that car here in NH just two Sundays ago.

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The $1,000,000 bid was phoned in.  I have 2 “suspects” in mind, but I don’t know who bought it. Happy motoring to whoever it is.

 

For sure now, the Indy Speedway Museum will never let the #22 car out the door. 

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Hmmm.... so that should make your clone worth around $750 k??

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No, I don't think the sale price of the #37 Indy car affects the price of a clone.  Still don't know who bought it, but working on it.

 

Meanwhile, I was back at Wray Schelin's Pro Shaper shop for more work on the tail.  The weld seams got ground down and a 4 ft long piece of oak cut to a chisel edge was used to hammer the rear edge of the tail seam into a straight line.  Wray and I then worked on wheeling the waves out of the top surface of the tail that were the result of welding.  We turned the wheels 90 degrees on Wray's "Poppa Bear" English wheel to be able to reach in 40 inches on the tail..There are a few more areas that need tuning, but we're getting there.  

 

I finished building the wire form for the seating area that will be joined to the tail eventually. Fortunately, I have photos of the seating area with the upholstery removed in both the blue #18 car and the green #37 car.  Once the wire form was done, I made patterns from brown paper for cutting the aluminum.   The seat bottoms are the most difficult pieces as they are pans that need lots of shrinking around the edges to mate with the seat backs.  We started forming with a mallet on the stump, paused for annealing, then tried Wary's huge power hammer and his Pullmax with shrinking dies.  As the driver's side pan came into shape, Wray put a Delrin chisel-shaped head into an air gun and "flow formed" the corners of the pan to match the wire form.  The passenger side pan is half done.  Fortunately, the other pieces for the seats are much easier to form.  I'll have to go back in September for more work on the tail.

 

Two other guys were working at Pro Shaper over the weekend on the Virgil Exner 1947 Studebaker concept car.  They decided that some of the pines at the belt line weren't right, so they reshaped the wire form and started making new panels.  With only one pastel chalk-on-sandpaper sketch as a guide, it's amazing that a car body can be made at all.  Nearby on the shop floor, a recreation of the 1930's Edward Macauley concept Packard in coming together, as well. 

 

 

tail in English wheel.jpg

seating wire form.jpg

seating paper patterns.jpg

seat bottom anneal.jpg

seat bottom flow forming.jpg

exner future car study.jpg

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After painting the frame rails gray and other pieces black, I’m reassembling the car. Since I’d only assembled it once before, the order of things isn’t clear but I’m taking notes for the future. It wants to be put together from one side to the other rather than from front to back. All the important pieces went back into place with only a few cases of taking things out again to put something else in place first. The plating company (Librandi’s in Harrisburg, PA) says the grille is almost ready, will ship next week. I can’t wait to see it in place. 

 

 

99AB9486-3DD1-4472-A73F-EA7946EF1C0E.jpeg

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How exciting to be getting this close. I followed you over here from your facebook post. I too  had wanted to go to Wray's class. Must be awesome to be building your dream. Thank you for the inspiration

Lee Parker

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Having painted the frame for the cockpit, I attached some 1"x1/16" woven web to the angle iron frame to keep the skin from squeaking when it moved.  As with the original cars, I used some split brass rivets, same as used on Model T Ford transmission bands, to hold the webbing in place. Squeezing the rivets was slow going, even with the right tool.  I put the cockpit skin over the frame, clamped it in about a dozen or more places, then fitted the flanges to the sides for riveting in place.  With everything clamped in place for the best alignment, I marked off the rivet holes on 1.5" centers, drilled with a #20 drill, and used my aircraft-quality rivet gun to put 24 rivets , 5/32" shank diameter, on each side.  I used a bunch of Clecos to keep the alignment of the skin with the flanges during the riveting process.  Rosie would be proud of me!  With the cockpit frame mounted on the chassis, I put the skin in place.  It looks pretty good, compares well to the original Indy cars.  The flanges will be held down tight to the chassis with a bunch of 1/4-20 screws from the bottom and acorn nuts on top.  Finishing the tail and the belly pan will require installing hundreds more rivets.

  

cockpit frame.jpg

cockpit riveting 1.jpg

cockpit riveting 2.jpg

cockpit riveted.jpg

cockpit side 37.jpg

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