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RansomEli

My previous daily driver is now AACA eligible!

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My 1989 Camaro convertible will be eligible for AACA tours next year! Also, I'll be eligible for Texas antique vehicle plates.

This is the first car I owned as a daily driver and kept until it became an antique. It's a sweet car - 98% stock with a 5.0 V8 and 5 speed manual transmission. The stick shift makes all the difference in the world. Can't help but smile as I drive down the road.

I may take it on local AACA tours but wouldn't dream of having it judged.

Any other members out there who suddenly find themselves with an antique?

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Hey.... I guess I have one too!

1989 Mercury Cougar.

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Although not my everyday driver. I inherited it from the original owner with only 42,000 kms (25,200 miles)

Kinda hard to believe it's that vintage now......

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Be careful of what you say. They will make it where your car will have to be 50 instead if 25.

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Don't write off your car being judged. There are 3 separate classes to judge a car.

The biggest class is for cars judged against the condition as it left the dealer's showroom "JUDGING". Most are restored and a few are very low mile cars.

The second class are un restored vehicles "HPOF". These usually have not been modified such as painted, different motor, interior. The vehicle is original, including tears in the interior, pealing paint, etc. These vehicles are important as bench marks for people doing a restoration.

The third category is classified as drivers "DPC". This allows the owner to make safety modifications or convenience items for ease of driving.

My 1931 Hupmobile has had a partial restoration including a repaint and new interior, turn signals, modern oil filter, etc. It has been judged as a DRIVER and I have driven it 17,000 miles in the last 14 years. When you go to a meet, submitting it be judged will enhance your visit. At the AACA Meets, you will find people photographing you car for documentation of their restoration. Keep in mind, Your car is original once, once you modify it, is a restored or driver car.post-41405-143142335371_thumb.jpg

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Be careful of what you say. They will make it where your car will have to be 50 instead if 25.

Why would the AACA do that Jack. We want more members, not less.

JSD, love your Hup too!

Wayne

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Back in 2000, I bought his 1986 Suburban from Trimacar to replace my 1977 Suburban tow vehicle.

So now I can pull a trailer with an early car to drive in one event, and use the tow vehicle to drive a late model tour!

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I guess I was not referring to the AACA.

In Oregon you can get special interest one time registration on a 25 year old car as long as it is used as a special interest car.

These days it is not uncommon for cars to last dependably for 25 years and there are many 25 year old daily drivers. So, if the DMV was to get that idea they may reconsider the age requirements for SI vehicles. Makes sense to me. It just seems odd that there are mid eighties cars at the shows these days. I see em on the field and in the parking lot.

What does HPOF and DPC stand for?

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)

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Jack M,

HPOF stands for Historic Preservation of Original Features. At an AACA Meet, these vehicles are not judged in the traditional manner, but rather are EVALUATED for areas of originality. an obviously used but not destroyed interior, as opposed to having been replaced with new (even if correct) materials; PRESERVED PAINT RATHER THAN REPAINT; dulling chrome rather than rechromed, correct style maintenance items such as belts, hoses, hose clamps, convertible top, wiper blades, etc. Our 1937 Buick Roadmaster earned her HPOF, and later earned her AACA ORIGINAL, which is an even higher level of originality. A certain number of areas are evaluated on each car, with a minimum number of areas required for HPOF. Vehicles attaining HPOF status can then be submitted for AACA Original status. Vehicles can be maintained as original (not be restored to HPOF).

DPC stands for Driver Participation Class - theses vehicles are also evaluated, rather than judged, and may be displayed at AACA Meets, even though there may be some changes from originality, such as 6 to 12-volt conversions, different wheels, add-on modern A/C, re-upholstery in different materials, etc - this a class for daily drivers, but not for out and out Street-Rods-- this is not intended to be a complete list, but rather an idea of the use of the terms

Hope this helps,

Marty

Edited by Marty Roth
after-thought (see edit history)

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I remember being startled to see a quite nice 1984 TransAM wearing Virginia antique plates at a cruise night 3 years ago- mainly because the last showroom new vehicle I bought was a 1984 TransAM! It didn't seem like it was that long ago...:P

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Thanks for the explanation Marty. I have seen these terms thrown around here for ever and hadn't a clue.

Just my ignorance.

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I don't even want to think about my 76 Elcamino that I purchased new, as an antique. It's still a good running member of my fleet that I use commercially from time to time.

(even my snow plow is almost 50 years old and that't not even complaining about this years cold)

I don't consider anything build after 1940 an antique, that would put me in that class.)

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Jack M,

You are welcome, and I/we appreciate the question. There are so many terms and varied acronyms out there, that keeping up is an ongoing task.

I hope you use that relatively rare Plymouth Suburban as much as possible, especially in regional events. Those were the earliest all-metal wagons, if I recall correctly.

MOPARs were among my drivers when growing up in NJ, including a '57 Savoy 4-door sedan (Dad's 1st new car), '56 Belvedere black 4-door, and a yellow/black '56 Belvedere 2-door Hardtop convertible. My younger brother's clarinet/saxophone teacher drove a brand new '57 DeSoto Adventurer and need a new rear pair of tires after only 2 weeks. Dad once buried the speedometer needle on a wide-open straight 2-lane portion of Highway 52 between Woodbourne and Ellenville, NY near the famed Tamarack Lodge hotel in the Catskill Mountains - a real thrill for me as a teenager. He was a Firefighter and serious driver.

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Yes, I am a Mopar guy.

Those big road cars of the fifties are among my favorites. I have a 56 Imperial that will eat up some highway.

I have had the good fortune to be able to buy and sell some cars that I enjoy. I NEVER seem to come out ahead. I recently purchased a 66 Satellite convertible, however it is stranded in Chicago where it is below zero on the Fahrenheit scale. I have some inexpensive storage so I am going to wait for better weather to get it shipped, or the possibility of a road trip is not out of the question.

As for the Suburban, I have had it for a couple of years now and very much enjoy it. Not totally stock but very close. I have added an overdrive tranny which really made a difference for day to day driving. I could trust this car to drive anywhere.

I am probably going to have to sell it to make room for the vert as my warehouse is full of future projects (that I should sell as well).

As long as we are having fun is what I always say.

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