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Orphan car series


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The 61 is actually out of the shot and the 34 chevy is the mocha colored mass behind the "L" and yes the 04 caddy is hidden between the tractor and the E-75. I tried to set the shop up to show the orphanage. Morrises, flottwegg and merkles stayed in the barn.... so many orphans, so little room at the orphanage. It was the chevy I was refering to as the non-orphan.

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Yes, I can add lots more!

Practically every car I own or have owned is/was/has become an orphan - did I do something I shouldn't have? ;) In no particular order, here are some of them...

1959 Triumph Herald Coupe:

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1964 Sunbeam Rapier:

IlkleyJubilee1995-1.jpg

1968 Singer Vogue Estate:

2011Singer.jpg

1998 Rover Sterling Coupe:

2010Rover.jpg

1978 MGB Roadster:

2008MGB.jpg

1971 Saab 99:

2002Saab.jpg

1922 Star 11.9hp:

1997Star.jpg

1929 Austin Seven Coupe:

1972A7Coupe.jpg

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Hi Nick,

It's a 1957 Triumph TR3; it belonged to a friend, John Ball. I navigated for him on a few historic rallies back in the late '90s; this pic was taken on the Classic Tour of Wales in 1998. I believe John sold the car a couple of years ago.

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My orphan cars are 1954 Austin Healey 100-4, 1952 Chrysler Imperial and 2010 Mercury Grand Marquis.

Production of the 2 passenger big Healey 4 cylinder ended with 1956 and Austin Healey itself with 1968 model 3000 BJ7? Last Chrysler product to carry the Imperial name was somewhere around 2000 and was an abomination and insult to the proud linage of the Imperial. 2010 was the last production run of the Mercury GM and Lincoln Town Car on the Ford Crown Victoria platform that was introduced in I believe 1992. 2011 ended the Ford CV and the taxi version. I like the big rear wheel drive sedans and the Mercury GM will probably be my last new car.

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The Blue one started as a willys aero custom.

From the Kaiser Forum:

This convertible was a factory prototype. It started life as a 1953 Aero Eagle hardtop and was shipped to Derham in Rosemont, PA where it was customized into a convertible. I believe the 1955 grille and hood were added later and, although I do not know for sure, I believe this was done just before the Kaisers invaded Willys-Overland (but please DO NOT QUOTE ME on that because I have no proof, only a hunch.) It was sold or given by the factory, as I remember a conversation with Paul Brim in the early 1980's, to Tom Poole, who was in R & D at W-O at the time. Paul Brim owned it after that and I believe he bought a rough car from Toole. It was stored outside on Brim's property in Bowling Green, Ohio for at least 20 years and deteriorated even more. Paul sold it to Ron Kleber, a psychiatrist in Marietta GA but Ron failed to pick it up for many years. Ron finally got it sometime in the 1990's (after some sort of law suit against Brim) and stored it indoors for the first time in about 30 years. There it sat for several more years until it was sold upon Ron's death to the current owner who spent a lot of time and money on the car. Lew Retzer talked him into bringing it to the 2012 Sweetwater, TN National and it was quite a hit. All the Derham photos of the car (as well as when I saw it a Kleber's) showed it to be a white car. The Blue color was the current owner's choice. And yes, the dash is pretty much factory.

Edited by nick8086 (see edit history)
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Our museum's 1914 Henderson Model 66, which apparently started life as a touring car, caught on fire and was converted to a pickup by a farrier, and later was turned into a roadster by Walt Myers. We don't have it on display, as we are trying to decide if we should build a touring car body for it (and the museum is full of other cars). I've only tracked down three other Hendersons.

post-58418-143142467913_thumb.jpg

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Our museum's 1914 Henderson Model 66, which apparently started life as a touring car, caught on fire and was converted to a pickup by a farrier, and later was turned into a roadster by Walt Myers. We don't have it on display, as we are trying to decide if we should build a touring car body for it (and the museum is full of other cars). I've only tracked down three other Hendersons.

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Nancy, I assumed that your car was related to the more famous Henderson Motorcycle but I see they are entirely distinct. It's actually a shame that you don't have the bike as one sold recently for about a quarter million. Anyway here's some info on the car.http://www.american-automobiles.com/Henderson.html

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Nancy, I assumed that your car was related to the more famous Henderson Motorcycle but I see they are entirely distinct. It's actually a shame that you don't have the bike as one sold recently for about a quarter million. Anyway here's some info on the car.http://www.american-automobiles.com/Henderson.html

No kidding! We just have one bike--a 1917 Cleveland. We sure could use an old Indian or Harley motorcycle, as both were here in Fairbanks's early days. We need a Duesenberg Model J too (but that's another story).

post-58418-143142468967_thumb.jpg

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