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reskinned riviera dash pad

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I had my upholstery shop cover mine, I didn't like the factory 2 tone blue with fabric seats mine had, and I always wanted a car with pearl white interior, (what was I thinking!) so for $200 he stripped the cracked top off, re-foamed and recovered it, 6 years later still looking good! Hind site, don't ever do a white dash top in the Florida sunshine!!! Brian

Edited by brivi65 (see edit history)
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Unless I was trying to do a 400 point restoration and resell the car for mega bucks, I think the cap, dyed to the correct color, should work for a nice driver.

Kaber,

This is a good point. Remember, your choice will literally be right under the nose of a potential buyer.The more you ask for the car, the closer the inspection. And over the years I have heard a lot of sellers crying about fussy buyers pointing out discrepancies in the car they have for sale.

I have two pads and plan to install a stitched leather cover with the new color changed interior I have planned.

Being 66 years old and owning the car for 36 years, concerns about selling the car are pretty low for me. It is going to be what I want. If I was under 55 I would make every effort to do the job in the original fashion.

Bernie

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[

Being 66 years old and owning the car for 36 years, concerns about selling the car are pretty low for me. It is going to be what I want. If I was under 55 I would make every effort to do the job in the original fashion.

Bernie

Just curious Bernie, what's the difference because of age?

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The age of a collector car owner has a lot to do with how long they will keep the car, what they will do with it, and its ultimate transfer of custodianship (the sale).

A younger person is more likely to sell their cars than a person nudging the 7th decade of their life. In my case, I may do a little thinning on my own. The cars I like the best are mine for the duration. Someone else is going to sell them. (Not real soon; my cardiologist and GP assured me that if I do the right things I'm good for a decade. If I make the decade, they think medical advances can get me another. We are planning on 4 more decades if we work together.)

Selling a car is the "pay me later" part of decisions like the dashboard cover. Being younger and selling a car with obvious concessions pointed out by the buyer can put the owner into fits of angst and hyperventilation.

A very memorable example was a 1952 Cadillac I looked at around 1992. It still stands out in my mind. The car was "restored" with all the best stuff one could find in the J. C. Whitney catalog, Western Auto, and Noah's Ark stores. Everything on the car was non-original, universal fit. He had spent his money and couldn't understand why the car sat without a buyer.

The age thing is to project today's decision into the future. When faced with the decision between original equipment and a modification or alternate think of it as if you were getting a tattoo.

Bernie

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B-I can relate to the role of mortality in choice of parts, non original replacement parts etc. I'm a little younger than you, but lately I find myself looking at everything I do on my cars and in my life and thinking "How's this gonna look in 20 years?". It's all about twenty years really. Here's another way of thinking about it: Everybody says once you re-cover your dash pad with vinyl, it's a countdown until the bubbles show up again. In twenty years it'll look like bubble wrap. The Just Dashes option seems grotesquely overpriced. In twenty years, that $1K investment will be have compounded to be worth almost $5K even at modest interest rates. Right now, the Dash Top I put on my car looks great and was priced right. It twenty years, I'm thinking it will still look great, nobody will be alive at that time who will notice it's not stock and I'll have $5K for beer and cigars. If I'm still alive. I'm planning on it. Just a thought. PRL

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Thanks Bernie, I knew you would have a good story for that question.

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I was going to finish that comment by writing one should consider the alternative or modified part as if you were buying a tattoo for your child. I restrained.

Bernie

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B-I can relate to the role of mortality in choice of parts, non original replacement parts etc. I'm a little younger than you, but lately I find myself looking at everything I do on my cars and in my life and thinking "How's this gonna look in 20 years?". It's all about twenty years really. Here's another way of thinking about it: Everybody says once you re-cover your dash pad with vinyl, it's a countdown until the bubbles show up again. In twenty years it'll look like bubble wrap. The Just Dashes option seems grotesquely overpriced. In twenty years, that $1K investment will be have compounded to be worth almost $5K even at modest interest rates. Right now, the Dash Top I put on my car looks great and was priced right. It twenty years, I'm thinking it will still look great, nobody will be alive at that time who will notice it's not stock and I'll have $5K for beer and cigars. If I'm still alive. I'm planning on it. Just a thought. PRL

Pete, you make a convincing argument, but having seen how perfect and correct your car is up to this point, putting a dash topper on your car is the equivalent of using a magic marker to put the finishing touches on the Mona Lisa. Your car is just too nice to cut any corners on the interior. This of course is the opinion of a purist who would like to go back to 1963 and

relive it all over again! A similar analogy would be the fellow who does a perfect correct restoration on a 63 split window corvette, then

decides when it is 95 per cent completed to cut the rear pillar out of the roof and install a 64 rear window glass so he can see

out his rear view mirror better!

Edited by Seafoam65 (see edit history)
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Ha. Whoa Seafoam, I'd never do anything Bill Mitchell wouldn't be proud of. That said, I once read that in the late 60's Mitchell displayed an affinity for silver and blue pantsuits that were color keyed match to his custom motorcycles. In light of that, I don't know how he could frown too much on a really nice dash topper. Thanks for the kind words about my rig. In truth, the topper fills a current need and is only 4 screws away from removal and replacement. That said, I am positively thrilled with the way it looks. Sometimes it works out that way. PRL

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Bill Mitchell had his own smooth style in car design. Harley Earl may have taught him how to dress:

Bill-Mitchell.jpg Earl would have put chrome pads on the elbows and knees of that suit, maybe a chevron at the crease of the cuff.

Bernie

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Bernie-That is awesome! I bet he used a stick to beat off the chicks in that get-up. PRL

. . . a great big stick !! LOL

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Could very well have been his stage clothes. Sometimes folks that have to give a talk or entertain have a stage costume. It all depends on how you want your appearance at certain times and places.

 

Turbinator.

Edited by Turbinator (see edit history)

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Bill Mitchell must have loved red.  He's infamous for red wheel wells.

 

Image result for bill mitchell's personal cars

 

Image result for bill mitchell's personal cars

 

Image result for bill mitchell's silver arrow I

 

Image result for bill mitchell's silver arrow I

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)
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I remember as a boy living in Los Angeles, gents would paint the wheel wells white then install lights the color of their car. Of course the lights were only turned on at night.

The time period was mid sixties. When it comes to customizing cars beauty is in the of the beholder.

Turbinator

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I'm just glad that neon tube phase has passed. Never did understand that one.

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On 1/22/2019 at 3:02 PM, RivNut said:

I'm just glad that neon tube phase has passed. Never did understand that one.

Ed, in some areas of the country the wheel wells still light up at night.

Turbinator

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Boy! Some things you just can't un-see,& that shot of Mitchell is one of 'em. Thanksalot! Bernie. How 'bout a spoiler alert next time!

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On 1/27/2019 at 8:30 AM, RIVNIK said:

Boy! Some things you just can't un-see,& that shot of Mitchell is one of 'em. Thanksalot! Bernie. How 'bout a spoiler alert next time!

Rivnik, it is a universal law that when you are cool, good looking, and drive a Riviera it must come out. The cool factor is too high to be hidden.

Turbinator

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On 1/22/2019 at 3:02 PM, RivNut said:

I'm just glad that neon tube phase has passed. Never did understand that one.

Ed, our friends were crackin’ On hard on the dashtop skins. Some of the dash covers maybe weak and not good looking at all. Poor fit , and down right not fitting for a proper Riviera. Well, after I finish this set of “ hubcaps” I’m polishing I’ll get that sorely disrespected DashTop product refitted and then we will have another look.

Turbinator

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Showing up in your Riviera is a lot like this.

 

That song was popular in certain circles in 1964. In 1968 we stopped in Hong Kong for R&R. A whole street of tailor shops greeted up. Just sit down and look through the copies of GQ and other men's magazines. They'd make you whatever you pointed to. Pick it up the next day. How could I resist a verde green continental suit. Then, a few years later, I got the like vintage Riviera.

I wonder where that suit ended up. I remember the girl who got my wool, Navy watch sweater and why she got it, but not the suit.

"Warning. Spoiler alert below the song.

 

746344148_001(2).thumb.jpg.3e13a4e77b4f390f7053acb4a990c932.jpg

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I'm going to try and recover mine myself. I'll let you know how it goes...

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You should see if Bernie still has that verde green continental suit. Suggest you try recovering your dash with that material. PRL
 

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On 1/30/2019 at 4:23 PM, 60FlatTop said:

Showing up in your Riviera is a lot like this.

 

That song was popular in certain circles in 1964. In 1968 we stopped in Hong Kong for R&R. A whole street of tailor shops greeted up. Just sit down and look through the copies of GQ and other men's magazines. They'd make you whatever you pointed to. Pick it up the next day. How could I resist a verde green continental suit. Then, a few years later, I got the like vintage Riviera.

I wonder where that suit ended up. I remember the girl who got my wool, Navy watch sweater and why she got it, but not the suit.

"Warning. Spoiler alert below the song.

 

746344148_001(2).thumb.jpg.3e13a4e77b4f390f7053acb4a990c932.jpg

Bernie, Some sailors and Marines I once knew would tell me stories of shore leave in the Far East. One of the standard comments was, “ How much that haircut cost you?”

Services provided other than tonsorial items were talked about quite a bit with my former military service friends.

Turbinator

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I have some non-original plans for my '64 Riviera since I intend to keep it for my duration now. Over the years I have acquired two good dash covers. The one on the car now was dyed black in the early 1990's and looks good. It has a slight deformation in the molded part close to one door. It is not enough to warrant any work for me.

The other cover has a crack at the speaker housing. I plan to have a cut and French stitched leather cover made for that one. I like that look and think I can maintain the original contours. I have studied the pattern making process for such a cover and will probably try it myself. If it turns out bad I have an upholstery shop that I trust to do what I want in a timely manner. I am hoping the leather cover will come in under $400.

Bernie

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