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Tellef

help in identifying a car.

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Hi,i just found an old car in the forest and do not know what it is.Does anyone here have anny clue?

The car is around 1930 i guess and has no room for more than 4 sylinder engine.The thing i looked at is the nice ornamented dor handels and the fact it has hydraulic brakes in the front.Anny help would be apresiated.

Here in Norway it is not often you fing an old car like this.

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Do you have overall photos showing the entire car to go with these close up photos? A photo of the entire car from the front, side and back would be useful.

Also, do you know what marques of cars were most commonly sold in Norway in the 1930s?

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Agree the year is approximately 1930. Wheels are from a later model car. The wide, low rear window, stainless cowl band, and bumper bring to mind Dodge, but the general impression I get is that it was a larger more prestigious car. However, not much to relate its size to. The dual ventilator doors and the motif on the top of the cowl are valuable clues.

Edited by Dave Henderson (see edit history)

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The weel base is 286 cm.(112,5"),and the trac with is 149 cm.(58,66"). i have not the entire lenght of the car,but i guess just over 400 cm.(157,4").

It loks like i would have to go in there to get some more photoes of the car,just to get some more meat on the bone for you.

It is just sparetire on the left front fender.

Did they usualy have anny data og the rear end of the cars?.This one is intact and may hold anny data if i lift the car up in the air.

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Looking at photoes of Marmon cars i agree. But looking at the instruments i guess it is older than 1929.

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Has Chrysler product parts on it. The windshield knobs are DeSoto/Plymouth. It all says DeSoto/Plymouth to me, except for the cowl vents which Dodge used in 1931. The interior window trim and quarter window handles are DeSoto/Plymouth. Wheels are newer.

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That wheel looks like a Ford wide 5 (36-39) welded to a center from another wheel. The front fenders have that seam which runs from front bead at the inside of the tire crown to the running board apron. This is a feature of Plymouths and DeSotos around 29-30 and some other cars. I also thought those dual vents were on Chryslers and Desotos of the early 30s.

Edited by Dave Mellor NJ (see edit history)

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Like the observations on handle design and fenders, but will say cowl isn't from a '28 to 30 Plymouth due to windshield. These years the windshield went up not out for ventilation. I believe this was the case for later Plymouths as well. Chrysler & DeSoto may have used this method also for several years.

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The door handles, window crank and rear window T handle are 1930 Chrysler. They are worth saving. Believe me.

Possibly a 30 Chrysler 77. ? ?

The outside door handle is something else.

Bill H

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HELLO ,, JUST WONDERING IF THIS 1930 CHRYSLER IF I STILL CAN GET AFTER MARKET RUNNING BOARDS ???post-103698-143142770741_thumb.jpg

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Cool car! You may want to start a new post about this. Scroll down to the Chrysler products section of the forum and ask there.

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That wheel looks like a Ford wide 5 (36-39) welded to a center from another wheel. The front fenders have that seam which runs from front bead at the inside of the tire crown to the running board apron. This is a feature of Plymouths and DeSotos around 29-30 and some other cars. I also thought those dual vents were on Chryslers and Desotos of the early 30s.

The stock cars that I race use what we call a wide five wheel. It is a copy of the Ford wheel of the day. The racing catalogs sell adapters that will let one run a wide five wheel on a small bolt pattern hub. Easier than welding.

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In case anyone cares (a year late), I have determined that the first car in question is indeed a 1931 Chrysler with the incorrect bumpers. Here are some details to compare....the front fender where it turns down over the frame horn is a dead giveaway.

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Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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1930 Chrysler, no chance of aftermarket running boards. Don't know if anyone makes authentic rubber covers for them.

A metal worker, body man or sheet metal worker could make new running boards. They are not complicated, and they car covered with rubber anyway.

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