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1949 Super Sedanette Survivor


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Oh, I'm sure they would. Just add money. It's probably going to cost me a lot just to return these. I'm going to recommend to anyone thinking of doing business with them to send them pictures first and make them verify the match before buying.

As for me, I already went and got some bulk tubing and fittings from Carquest and will do it right myself. I borrowed a double-flare tool from Carquest. Too bad I discovered it was broken when I got it home. Luckily, I already have my own single-flare tool and I could use the double-flare die from theirs in mine. Got the first line already made up. Took about 2 hours. The next ones should go faster.

Edited by Wheelnut (see edit history)
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I mentioned earlier that I bought pre-sized lines off of a supplier from ebay. I had a simlar situation with the second batch, the first set I got for my '41 Roadmaster worked out fine, but the set I got last year to do my '56 Roadmaster, the sizing of the lines was way off. For instance, a line for the rear axle was about 20" too long, and another was too short, about half were wrong in some manner. The supplier was willing to send me replacements, but it turned out he was using pre-made lines, and wasn 't doing them custom for the car's requirements (which I thought he was), and the lenghts the car needs don't all fit into neat, standard sizes. So, I eneded up doing what you're doing, making them up myself. Had to redo one or two, due to bad flaring, but it all worked out well.

Keith

Edited by Buicknutty
grammar (see edit history)
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Well, I got the 3 long lines for the rear section made up and installed. Perfect fit!

Then I ran into another setback. One of the DPOs apparently decided it was a good idea to leave the old worn shoes on one wheel despite being in there recently to change a wheel cylinder and a few clips. Then he continued to drive it, wearing completely through the friction material. The drum is ruined. Those grooves are probably about 100 thou deep.

So... I snagged a pair of NOS Kelsey Hayes drums from ebay. Keeping my fingers crossed that they are right.

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...So, I eneded up doing what you're doing, making them up myself. Had to redo one or two, due to bad flaring, but it all worked out well.

Keith

Keith, I had to make about 3 or 4 practice flares before I could do a decent one. Biggest problem was getting them to not come out lopsided. I learned that having the tubing cut exactly square and evenly chamfering the edges of the cut was the biggest factor to getting a good flare. Seems that the tubing cutter does not consistently cut straight and it's easy to get an angled cut.

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Your photo with the engine number shows a clamp on the breather line about where the fuel line comes over from the frame. We had some discussion on this clamp in my '51 thread. I'd be curious if the clamp on your car's breather tube is actually attached to anything underneath. On other cars, this clamp has been positioned where the breather tube comes off the engine to secure that end. Is there any clamp on the breather tube at the front/top end?

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I wanted to chime in on the In-Line Tube issue too.

My neighbour has been doing several cars in the last 15 years and while they look stock from the first on look, they have been updated mechanically (modified) but to a degree that you truly don't know it until you open the hood. He also used SS brake lines from In-Line and even though it was a 1969 Camero, just didn't quite fit. He did some tweaking to get there (which was difficult being SS) and from then on has purchased regular steel lines.

What I wanted to add here is that once he gets them to fit right, he takes them off and clear coats them. As he doesn't drive them in the winter but stores them, the thinking is that they will not start to flash rust even if getting caught out in the rain and parked. Just thought that makes some sense.

I have a set of In-Line brake lines for my '58 Special and even with laying them out under the car, will be expecting that they will have to be tweaked to fit after reading about yours and others experiences.

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Eric, the clamp is attached to the engine block with a bolt through the oil pan. There is nothing supporting the front end of the breather tube forward of that other than the housing that it attaches to at the top. It also appears that there is a space in the clamp for the fuel line. I'd assume that this arrangement is a maintenence hassle so the line probably often does not get put back.

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Edited by Wheelnut
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I mentioned earlier that I bought pre-sized lines off of a supplier from ebay. I had a simlar situation with the second batch, the first set I got for my '41 Roadmaster worked out fine, but the set I got last year to do my '56 Roadmaster, the sizing of the lines was way off. For instance, a line for the rear axle was about 20" too long, and another was too short, about half were wrong in some manner. The supplier was willing to send me replacements, but it turned out he was using pre-made lines, and wasn 't doing them custom for the car's requirements (which I thought he was), and the lenghts the car needs don't all fit into neat, standard sizes. So, I eneded up doing what you're doing, making them up myself. Had to redo one or two, due to bad flaring, but it all worked out well.

Keith

.... a lot of the well, clowns for a lack of a better word, selling full time with stores on sleaze bay are doing a lot of this one size fits all mentality and it's getting worse not better. Include seat covers, car covers, gasket sets and the list goes on.

Wheelnut .. those are indeed very nice and rare documents. I was surprised to see 4-Tran type computer cards being used as early as 1949. Any other older computer guys know what I speak of.

When you have that car up like that make sure to either completely cover and protect those white walls or take the wheel/tire combo off completely and set aside. If you get any grease on them you may not get it off the white wall. Also, it is best not to stack the white wall tires and keep them separated for if you do the black of the opposing tire will permanently mark the face of the adjoining white wall side of the that tire. ....... Keep plugging away.

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I wanted to chime in on the In-Line Tube issue too.

My neighbour has been doing several cars in the last 15 years and while they look stock from the first on look, they have been updated mechanically (modified) but to a degree that you truly don't know it until you open the hood. He also used SS brake lines from In-Line and even though it was a 1969 Camero, just didn't quite fit. He did some tweaking to get there (which was difficult being SS) and from then on has purchased regular steel lines.

What I wanted to add here is that once he gets them to fit right, he takes them off and clear coats them. As he doesn't drive them in the winter but stores them, the thinking is that they will not start to flash rust even if getting caught out in the rain and parked. Just thought that makes some sense.

I have a set of In-Line brake lines for my '58 Special and even with laying them out under the car, will be expecting that they will have to be tweaked to fit after reading about yours and others experiences.

Good idea but the stainless lines are mainly used to protect from the moisture corrosion that occurs inside of the line. Brake fluid is hydroscopic and collects atmospheric moisture over time. Water does not compress but it does cause rust inside of the lines. But then again, if you change your brake fluid once every two years at the most then internal rust should not become a real problem.

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Two steps forward, one step back. I suppose I should get used to this. I got the 'new' brake drums -- which was when I learned what NORS means: New Old Reject Stock! After fitting the drums it was immediately apparent that they were warped. So off to the brake shop to have them trued up. Sigh...

Anyway, they came out fine, but probably not a lot of material left if they need to be resurfaced later on. These Kelsey Hayes replacements are a little different from the originals. On the originals the steel center section is welded to the cast iron drum. On these it has tabs that are heat staked.

Back brakes are now finished!

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Edited by Wheelnut (see edit history)
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Moving on to the front brakes.

I couldn't bring myself to reassemble the front brakes with all of the caked on crud there. So the first priority was to to clean the mess up. I managed to scrape off a pound or so of the stuff before I hit metal. Then I sprayed it with mineral spirits and used coarse steel wool pads to get the rest loosened up. A final spray of mineral spirits and wipe-down with rags finished the job.

There is supposed to be a seal gasket between the steering knuckle and the brake backing plate. The original was some kind of fiber-felt type material - which of course disintegrated during cleaning. I made a substitute from some 1/8" neoprene foam sheet that I had on hand.

Reassembly is so much nicer when things a clean! Wheel bearings got repacked, and new grease seals installed. The front drum braking surface was fine, just needed a light sanding to clean up some surface rust and break the glaze.

Next will be making up the new front brake pipes and rebuild or replace the master cylinder.

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How the heck have I been missing this. Beautiful forty nine Wheelnut. First thing I'd do if I ever won the lottery...buy my wife a 49. Thanks for posting all the beautiful pictures. Enjoy her!!!!

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It's got the Dynaflow, so the engine has hydraulic lifters.

A great find, no doubt! Do not recall seeing alot of them back in the day?

A question about your comment tranny/lifter comment. What is the corelatiion there. You phrase it in the manner of, "Of course night follows day!"

Us non-Buick guys do not know what to you is the obvious, so educate me, please. Why could not a Buick with a dynaflow trans have solid lifters?

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How the heck have I been missing this. Beautiful forty nine Wheelnut. First thing I'd do if I ever won the lottery...buy my wife a 49. Thanks for posting all the beautiful pictures. Enjoy her!!!!
Until I saw a nice example of one of these recently I had been looking for something in the 1951-53 range. My wife wanted a '54 convertible, light blue... and something about the deed to a platinum mine. I'm just hoping to get this one drivable before her birthday next week.
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A question about your comment tranny/lifter comment. What is the corelatiion there. You phrase it in the manner of, "Of course night follows day!"

Us non-Buick guys do not know what to you is the obvious, so educate me, please. Why could not a Buick with a dynaflow trans have solid lifters?

My understanding is that the Dynaflow option included the hydraulic lifter engine by default, and that manual trans cars of this year came with solid lifter engines. I don't know why.
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My plan to rebuilt the master cylinder isn't going to happen. This one is too pitted. I really like the "Made in Dayton USA" on the casting. Too bad I can't keep that. The replacement will probably be blank or say "Made in China" :rolleyes:

I'll keep this one around though and maybe get it resleeved for that frame-off job someday.

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'49s are pretty much my favourite Buicks but I'm a sucker for wheelbase, so my dream car would be a lovely original, like yours, but with that extra pair of portholes - a Roadmaster. Happily for me, a sedanet of that description hasn't shown up on these forums lately, so life goes on as normal. Don't know what I'd do if a black one appeared for sale. Have to sell the house, I guess.

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Did you buy it already? It says sold!

B, careful, I'm taking that as a serious offer.

Uh oh, there's a really nice one available in Montreal - http://www.auto123.com/en/used-cars/classified/quebec/montreal/buick/roadmaster-sedanette/1949/3420663. Never mind, it's not an original piece. It's clearly been restored, although I could probably get over that. Fun to dream.

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I got tired of waiting for Cars to ship me a new master cylinder, and I had a rebuild kit on hand, so I decided to go ahead and give a try at fixing the original. First step was to ream it out with an adjustable reamer. I reamed it out until the reamer marks looked about as deep as the remaining pits. Then I finished it with a brake cylinder hone in a kerosene bath. Finally a bit of finish with 600 grit. I got most of it cleaned up pretty nice after opening it up to 1.020" (20 thou oversize).

There are still a couple of deep pits near the end that I knew would take too much to clean up, so I left them. I'm hoping that they are outside the range of the cups. When I first installed it and bled the system I noticed a few drips from the boot end. That's when I also noticed that I had forgotten to adjust the pushrod and lock it down. So I adjusted the pushrod to move the rear cup just ahead of the remaining pits... I hope. I'll keep an eye on it and see how it holds up.

I used the DOT 5 silicone brake fluid. The brakes feel pretty good after getting them bled, with the help of my wife. That's one job she's getting pretty good at after numerous cars. She pumps the pedal for me. :) I got the system primed with a vacuum bleeder, but it still takes a bit of old fashioned manual pump/bleed to get the last of the air out. The whole system took just a bit over one 11oz bottle of fluid to fill. I probably bled about 1/2 a bottle through it though, so it takes 2 bottles to do the job. Nice thing about all the new plumbing is that the fluid came out totally clean.

Oh yeah, I got the entire brake system overhaul done without breaking a single rusty fastener! I was actually able to clean up and re-use all the fasteners except for expendable stuff like cotter pins, and brake hardware. Only one bolt, on the parking brake cable clamp, was stuck bad enough that it needed a little help by heating with a propane torch.

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Woohoo! Got to take my first test drive!

After pulling cautiously out of the garage and down the driveway, I decided to take it up and down the street. Made a turn around at the cul de sac, taking up the entire circle to turn, and headed back toward the house. Those finger grips in that big steering wheel are not just there for looks! Anyway, it was stopping and going pretty good, so I kept going. It was about 8:30PM last night, and I went the mile or so to my brother's house. I pulled up in his drive and honked the big ol horn. :cool:

After mulling it over for a few minutes (or maybe 30 seconds), we decided to take it out for a more serious test drive. The dash lights are not working, or I don't know how to turn them on. So my brother held a flashlight to the gauges so we could see how fast we were going. First we went down a windy road for a mile or so at about 45. It was a bit wallowy on the tighter turns. I think the shocks are going to need some attention. But the handling was reasonably good. It tracked straight and the steering felt as tight as it should.

The engine pulled well, and fairly smooth, but there was just a hint of roughness. I haven't touched it yet as far as tuning goes. It's burning very clean--no trace of smoke from the exhaust. The Dynaflow... well I guess you don't talk about how they shift... it just goes. The good thing is that it goes. We took it out on a highway and got up to about 55 and it rode pretty smooth and quiet. There were a couple of random interior rattles when hitting bumps in the road but it's pretty tight overall. The heaters worked Yay! We put the old radio on an old station for a while -- it picks up a lot of stations! Turn signals are hard to get used to with the lever being on the right side of the column instead of the left.

Now for the bad. Going around tight left-hand turns, like pulling a U-turn at the light, the transmission slipped badly. I'm pretty sure it's just low on fluid. What fluid do they take? The manual just says "add Special Buick Oil for Dynaflow Drive". What the heck is that?

Then the brakes started squeeling under use. I think it's the front right side. I had them a little tight to start with, assuming that they'll quickly need readjusting, so they were a bit on the hot side. I didn't turn the front drums either, so maybe the surface is not the best for bedding new shoes. I'll have to pop that drum off and check it out.

The engine temp stayed below the 1/2 mark on the gauge the whole time, if it can be trusted. Headlights and charging system (still 6 volt) seemed to be working pretty good.

When I got it home and parked I saw a nice trail of red tranny fluid where I backed it into the garage. All in all, nothing unexpected for first run-out of a 64 year old original car.

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Congrats on a successful first trip! Now you're really hooked!!:D I use Dexron III in my Dynaflow. Keep an eye on that tranny leak. It can get worse FAST. Believe me, I know.

On the master cylinder, you said it came out bored 20 over stock. The re-build kits are made to fit a 1" bore. That may cause problems or even be dangerous. Perhaps one of the more learned guys can chime in on that. I sent mine off to be sleeved.

Edited by shadetree77 (see edit history)
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Yeah, I think the .020" oversize on the master cylinder is a bit much for long term reliability. There is some "lore" out there that says that's about the max allowable, but I did find one old military document from 1944 that says .004" is the max allowed under its spec.

http://www.90thidpg.us/Reference/Manuals/TM%209-1827C.pdf

The Buick shop manual permits no oversize.

Also, by adjusting the brake pushrod to move the back cup forward of the remaining bad spot in the cylinder, I may be interfering with the function of the compensation port at the front cup. According to that old Army manual, the spool needs to be all the way back against its stop, and there should be some free play in the linkage.

I've got a new one on order and will swap it out. But this one gives me functional brakes so I can move the car right now.

Edited by Wheelnut (see edit history)
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I'm glad you dug deeper into the master cylinder limitations when rebuilding. These heavy cars can use all they can get when braking is concerned. Congratulations on your first drive of any distance. It gets more intriguing with every item repaired or replaced doesn't?

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  • Wheelnut changed the title to 1949 Super Sedanette Survivor

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