Jump to content

body man -door fitment help please- packard


Guest ray17025

Recommended Posts

Guest ray17025

I am rebuilding the wood on my 1928 Packard 526. Since I am building the wood, and the original was totally rotted, I have minimal reference points, but, I have the a, b, and c pillars in place and put the doors in just for checking some coarse spacing and general house keeping. The problem that I am having, (that I hope translates in the photos) is that even with both sets of doors parallel to within a MM or so top to bottom, the bottom few inches seems to curl toward the front of the car. I can move any of the pillars or rack the body, but that just gives me a trapezoid, not solve my problem.

Any ideas???

post-72551-143142276689_thumb.jpg

post-72551-14314227672_thumb.jpg

post-72551-143142276737_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Winther

Hello.

I have for some years ago made same work to an old Packard, with no problems. In your case, I will make some change to the doors. If your pillars are in perfect place, this will be a solution.

I have made a lot of coachwork on old cars and sometime you will discover, that parts have got wrong fit over the years.

Regards

Palle Winther

Denmark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ray17025

I tend to blame any issues on my shortcomings, not the steel. My problem with your suggestion is that all 4 doors exhibit the same issue. Again leading me to believe that I have built something wrong. I also am very hesitant to modify original pieces if at all possible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had all the same problems with a 1929 Packard 633 Sedan. It took about 6 months on & off before I got all 4 doors to fit reasonably and even then it was not perfect. I replaced all of the timber in the car but there is no scope for changing the shape of the front and centre pillars. The lower end of the rear pillar could be brought in or out a little.

I made a large collection of different thickness shims for the hinges. I am sure you are finding that when you correct one side or corner another goes the wrong way. No words of wisdom, just keep at it.

To ensure that all three hinges were aligned I used a single rod from top to bottom for the initial set up.

Its a very tedious job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ray I have never installed a door on a car . But I have installed doors on a construction site . Try working at first with the top and bottom hinges and leave the middle hinge loose . Try not chewing all the wood up with all the hinge screws try installing the minimal so the door does not fall or move while you are trying to align the door . See if that helps with your alignment . Another trick is and it works if you are trying to line up the doors or get more clearance on the jambs . Get a piece of cardboard from a cereal box or tissue box .Cut a small strip the distance from the screws to the recess in the wood jamb . What you are trying to do is make the hinge able to tilt on one side [ exterior side ] or tilt it on the [ interior side ]. Right now the hinge is laying flat on the jamb . If the card board is required to pull the door left or right in the opening , move the card board strip from side to side . You might need a few strips on 1 side . I do not know if I have explained this correctly or not . Mark

Edited by Mark Gregory (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you take some pictures that show more of the door (hinge area). I agree with Mark, working the hinges (even bending them some) can do wonders for alignment issues. I'd need to see what the gap on the hinge side to better understand what is going on, however, the alignment issue in the first picture would be easily solved by either a small shim on the top hinge or tightening the bottom hinge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest ray17025

I appreciate everyones responses, however everybody has missed that the doors are parallel. Any amount of body shimming or door manipulation would change this, without influencing my issue. I build furniture as a hobby, so I understand how to make doors fit an opening. My question was more about the opening itself. The engineer in me was just fixating on the fact that both sides exhibit virtually the same phenomenon. Stepping away, (and making a cardboard mock-up has led me to the embarassingly simple answer. The B pillars are "twisted" in relation to the A and C. This is making the normaly inward curve to face slightly forward. The fix, and/or how this happened will take a little more thought. Again, I am grateful, even if I appear dismissive, the responses kept the wheels turning when it could have been a reason to stay out of the garage.

post-72551-14314227909_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The wood in the doors is sagging/warped........they need to be straightened/squared;...... I'm guessing. I am in the process of restoring a '28 Chrysler with a Fisher body. It had a similar problem. Double check; no, triple check the squareness and tolerances of the body. These bodies were built on jigs in the factory; check the width, height, length, of the door openings in all three dimensions. Establish at set of points for all corners of the doors and corners of the body.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...