john2dameron

Young people and old cars

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This thread is interesting and very much in line with what I did this weekend to promote our hobby to the younger generation. We have a friend who just turned 30 with three small daughters, has been very sick for the past three years and been through a lot since their marriage four years ago, most recently the death of his mother in law two weeks ago. He loves the old cars, is a crack professional mechanic with his own licensed shop as a side business he is just starting. His day job since age 24 is manager of the fleet repair shop where he works.We have talked off and on about my cars, he as helped me with the Avanti and I love his lift and shop! Saturday he came over and we loaded the '38 Roadmaster and took it to his house. It has not been run since 1998 so it needs a little work to run and some TLC. He loves the car best of all of ours so we made a deal. He will keep the car at his house, return it to running condition and use it with his family as his own. I will own it, insure it, pay for all parts and have use of it when I want.I am excited about this idea from a few perspectives. A big one is my hope that I am promoting a young person's long term interest in the hobby. By letting him use the car with his family I also hope his girls get excited. This is also a way for a young person to enter the hobby in an affordable manner at a time in life he could not do it otherwise and maybe get two generations hooked. For me it gets a car I have neglected for way too long back on the road, I get to use it again, the value goes up with it running and I may have created a buyer for it down the road. (He has already asked if that was in the cards in the far future). We will probably invite them along on some local club events furthering his and his families' interest.We will have to see how this works out but he is a good friend, trustworthy person and I am comfortable in this adventure with him. It is a car I was not using since our interests have turned more to brass cars in recent years and he will love it like it deserves. I will probably fall in love with it again when I drive it next year too! Just getting it out in the daylight made me realize I still like the looks of it and I am not ready to get rid of it. It is still an impressive, rarely seen car with the dual sidemounts and is now even a CCCA recognized car. All in all I see it as a win-win for both of us! [ATTACH=CONFIG]223021[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]223022[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]223023[/ATTACH]
Avantey, that is great. I hope it works out well for both of you. Encourage him all you can.

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I still don't understand why some people want to just complain that young people are not interested in old cars.

Matt: With all due respect you are missing the whole point on this subject. 1st we are not "COMPLAINING"; we are just stating the

facts. Nothing more; nothing less. I just can not see where you see the interest from the young people as a whole. Larry

P.S. I want to perserve the "old car thinking" probably more then you; but it is simply not there.

Ilskis, with all due respect to you, I think you are missing the point of the thread. As Avantey pointed out, only a very small percentage of adults are interested in old cars so why do we expect the majority of young people to be interested in old cars. I attend two churches, the pastor at one church is interested in trucks because he is a retired trucker but no one at either church shows any interest in old cars. When I was at Westvaco I knew hundreds of people and few of them were interested in old cars. The ones that were interested were in the 20 to 40 age category and not 50 and 60. I used to do a car show at a local school and the kids loved it. The teens begged to help with the show and the younger ones brought their model cars and waited their turn to help.

Avantey pointed out that less than one percent of the adults of this nation belong to the AACA that number could be lower because some of our members do not live in America. We are not likely to bring people into the AACA who are 70 years old because if they wanted to join they would have done so years ago. It just might be that a larger percentage of the young people have an interest in antique cars than of the adults. Let's think positively as Matt Hinson and Avantey are doing and reach out to the younger people and nurture their interest instead of denying it. (If my language seems harsh, forgive me.)

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I can only think of three people in my 1970 HS class (of about 150) who had any interest in old cars... and all three of us are still friends today. With the exception of one cousin, no one in my family, or that I came into contact with through my family, shared that interest to even the smallest degree. If they had any opinion at all it was more likely to be my father's, that old cars were a stupid waste of time... and this was more than 40 years ago. The number of people that share an interest in this subject is and always has been quite small although, looking at it from the inside, it may not seem that way. In my real life I deal with the authors of collecting related books every day and many of them are dismayed that "everyone" doesn't share their interests. In fact, almost everyone they know does share their interests and this badly distorts their notion of just how popular that interest is.

We have no way of anticipating where the next generation of collectors will come from or what they will value. Personally, I suspect that a car simply being 25 years won't cut the mustard. It doesn't for me now... As I've said before, I very much doubt that many 20s Packard phaetons will be heading for the scrap yard because no one wants them... though if I still had my '71 Ford Pinto I'd be sending to the scrap yard myself without a shred of regret. No one can say that brass cars only appeal to people that remember them, because virtually no one is alive who does remember them – but that doesn't seem to have hurt their value. I collect early 19th century (pre-1830) New England rifles and the last person who carried one to the local militia muster probably died 150 years ago, but they don't seem to have gotten cheaper and I've never picked one out of someone's trash.

There may be plenty of potential car collectors out there... but how many people in their 20s or 30s have the disposable cash to buy them? I bought a '27 Cadillac in quite remarkable unrestored condition (it would be considered a fantastic "survivor" today) when I was 19 and drove it as my everyday car. Believe me, that was considered as strange then as it would be today. When I sold it, I bought a '29 PI Rolls Royce (for $3500). I doubt any of my nephews could afford to do something like that today even if they did have the interest. But, one of them is restoring a '46, 500cc BSA. I gave him the bike simply because he's bright and showing an interest... I feel as if there is a great deal of pointless hand-wringing going on here and in my more cynical moments I've thought the real question is "who'll pay a lot of money for the car I like when I want to sell it?"

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Matt: keep pushing "OUR" point of view - It is great how your family is dedicated to our hobby -both of our kids grew up in the hobby, and attend when their jobs allow - my son and daughter both appreciate the cars as well as those who preserve them (that is how they were brought up), and had many sets of surrogate grandparents whenever we were on tour. Our grandson had his permit for about 10 days and drove the Sentimental Tour in 2012 at age 15-1/5 and judged the next month in Shelbyville -- we need to make, and keep it a family thing, and then expand it to our neighborhood family.

Larry: regional differences aside, I know that some younger families seem to have other priorities, but you would be amazed at how, by being invited to a few local activities, they start to feel like part of the group, and eventually DO become a part of the hobby. I know you mean it in a positive way - help us to put our cars, and especially the Brass Buicks, where young folks can see and touch, and go for a ride with us. Excitement is contagious.

Bill: FANTASTIC - you remember how I bugged you last summer, that I would drag out the '38 Buick and get it running? I love that car (so much like our '37), and think that your approach is one of the best I've seen. Your whole approach is not only generous, but very smart. You get a great car running, get a young family involved in the hobby, and give them a fun and affordable way to enjoy it. I know you'll want to drive the Buick on the 2014 Glidden in Defiance, Ohio next September. Is the recipient the gentleman who brought the Avanti back to your home last June? How did he make out in Texas?

Terry Bond: I had the pleasure of meeting Tyler, and am delighted to learn of his election to your Region's Board - please give him my regards and congratulations - it seems that he has been in the hobby for more than his actual years.

Howard: I enjoyed meeting your granddaughter when she drove you and Chris all over Alabama and Tennessee in your beautiful Plymouth convertible on the Founders Tour - and you were certainly the proud grandpa - the smile never left your face the entire week!

Dave Mellor: Junkyard memories brought me back to my Linden days and all the hours spent hunting parts in the wrecking yards in Avanel - I actually built a Crosley Hotshot, maintained a '42 Chevy, and made my '49 Pontiac convertible completely street-worthy. The younger folks do not have the same access as we did in the 1950s and '60s. We need to include them - give them the chance to share our garage experiences, etc.

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AACA does not ask for any demographic information so we cannot answer this question.

AACA's memberships have changed very little over the last few years. We had a small dip in 2012 but have more than made up for that in 2013. Our membership count is the highest it has been since 2010 (did not go back any farther to check).

"so keep smilin' at 'em and open that passenger door- best sales tool we ever have!! " AMEN!

AACA expects memberships to rise again in 2014. We have numerous new initiatives to try and make this happen. The club is aggressively seeking growth in all segments and certainly "youth" (driving age to 50) is a major target.

The way I see it is when these discussions do not take place that means no one cares. Whether I agree with some of the premises or not, it is good that people have the opportunity to talk about our hobby and our goal of preserving history.

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Like has been said before, the club is undertaking some great initiatives in this regard, but still it so depends on what each of us do individually to help secure the future of our hobby.

The topic surfaces quite often, was wondering if having a separate forum called "youth involvement" might be a good idea. It would be a handy one-stop reference point for all the discussion, including the many great ideas that always come up when the subject is aired. Example, we had a neat activity earlier this year organized by Andy Furhman from Richmond. He's active in Boy Scout leadership and brought a troop down for a camp-out at our Virginia Beach Aviation Museum. Never missing a chance to involve old cars, Andy invited some of our members out to do a history lesson for the group. We had Al Swenson's 1967 Mustang, Susan's 1948 MGTC, Bob Stein's 1937 Pontiac, Neil Sugermeyer's 1931 Willys, and Sam Kern's 1925 Franklin. There was quite a range of auto history and significant technological innovation represented there and the kids all came away with a lot of knowledge and a lot more interest that they started with. Who know - perhaps there's a future AACA leader among them?

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IIskis, regarding the "Who makes it?" question . . . back when we were in High School, and younger, cars were a much more important part of our lives. They were our (and our family's) "status" in the world, there were so MANY ways to get a car equipped, that that would even fit into the "status" situation, too. Knowing about cars (and possibly sports) was just what "guys" did, back then, from what I remember. Cars were more the center of our universe back then, compared to now. Cars were our "freedom" and all that that meant to us AND those we might want to impress (who usually wore skirts, back then). If we drove cars, many usually had to work on them OR find somebody that could. It was a huge network, back then!

Car maintenance, car washing and waxing, etc. It was just a bigger part of our lives and somewhat defined "Who we were", individually and as a society.

AND it is still happening, just that many of us are NOT usually around where it does. In the 1990s, one of our car club members was getting his Plymouth Superbird re-assembled. His son was deep into 5.0L Mustangs, as were many of his friends. I was over at his shop one evening when some of the son's Mustang associates came by. John was also working on his Mustang, too, changing the K&N air filter element. These guys were talking among themselves about their Mustangs and those their friends had, as to what had been done to them and whatever. What further surprised me was when one started quoting an article about which mods were worth how much extra horsepower, just like WE used to do. And it continued from there, to drag racing improvments. You could have clicked things back about 45-50 years and and it would have been some of use, or the "big boys" we wanted to emulate when WE grew up, except about '57 Chevys or Fords or Plymouth/Dodge cars.

To me, one of the "sins" many older vehicle enthusiasts can make is to overlay THEIR orientations onto what THEIR CHILDREN should be interested in, relating to cars. WE might guide and mentor them, but being the indivual human beings they are, THEY need to develop and expand their own horizons, at their pace, rather to have something shoved down their throat, it seems to me. By observation, if the father is restoring a particular "car of his youth", the offspring will be around it and can gain an appreciation of it AND might want something similar . . . provided they LIKE that particular one . . . later on. That parent/offspring "bonding" situation! Or, if the parent is doing a '57 Chevy, from research and such, the offspring might desire to get their feet wet with a '58 Ford or '62 Dodge.

I've said it before and I'll say it again . . . If you want to see parent/offspring vehicle hobby involvement at a high level, venture up to the Mopar Nationals in Ohio. Look at how many younger people you see on the grounds. Look at how many "our general age" people you see there. Look at the "Young Guns" section of the car show area, too! One of the last years I was able to go, even Mothers tending to grandkids (in their arms) under the Viper tent! Now, Carlisle might have more older Chrysler product orientation, but the Mopar Nats is "total Mopar involvement" from about the 1950s up until current models.

And, you can probably see some of the same things at similar Ford or GM-brand events, too. But if you only go to your local car club chapter meetings and such, you'll probably only see "our age" people, unless somebody might have brought their grandkids, who were visiting. And, with time, you'll probably here some laments "No younger people want to join our club, so the hobby is doomed . . . " dialogue. Be that as it may . . .

In the "greater" DFW area, the number of weekend AND week-night car cruise events has increased phenominally since the later 1970s! Populations have expanded and so has the number of car enthusiasts, it seems. Some clubs have grown as other new ones (in many cases, of national affiliations) have come into the area with the people moving here from other locales. Plus the popular "Cars and Coffee" events. Perhaps they might see some exotic, high-end car they've heard about, then walk a few rows over for the modern Detroit "iron" factory 600+ horsepower hot rod, then a restored '60s or '70s muscle car, and possibly an "estate car" '65 Olds 98 4-dr hardtop (with the HUGE back seat and trunk, typical of such cars back then), or a pristine '66 Chevy Impala 2-dr hardtop. And, some of the owners of those Olds 98s or Impalas inherited those cars from family members (which gives them an automatic connection to THAT car, or one like it).

The opportunities are THERE and GROWING to get younger people excited about older cars and trucks . . . just that not every younger person might have those inclinations. Certainly, I suspect the percentages will be less than in the times when WE grew up, but the fact the percentages are still there is what matters! To some of these younger people, an "older car" would be a '90s Mustang LX hardtop 5.0L car, or possibly a '66 Mustang GT 2+2 289 4bbl car, for example. But the KEY THING is that they get involved in the hobby AND like it. Even if they might have to take some time out to establish a family and homestead, they'll probably get back into it when things get more stabilized for them. By observation, once you get "the bug" and "the passion", it seldom leaves.

Key thing is to get them to "smell the gasoline" (or "smell of burning rubber in the morning", to co-opt a famous movie dialogue). Then take it from there in a mutually-beneficial manner, hopefully. "Take a kid to a car show" is a great place to start (SEMA/ARMO tag line).

WE can do this!

NTX5467

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I don’t think kids are any different now than they were when I was in high school in the seventies. I was in a class of 800 students with about 10 of us total that had an interest in old cars. A larger number of kids liked period cars but had no idea how to work on them. Others liked motorcycles or comic books. I know there was a period in the fifties when there was a boom in numbers of young car enthusiast but cars were cheep then. Today’s young people have huge cell phone bills<st1:PersonName w:st="on">, </st1:PersonName>computers<st1:PersonName w:st="on">, </st1:PersonName>game systems ect ect that delete their wallets. They feel they need these things to fit in with other kids and that’s ok. I have quite a few young neighbors that are in their early 20s married with kids and house payments. They LOVE my old cars and talk about the day when they can have a garage and work on their own projects. We need jobs in this country badly for this hobby to continue. Just my two cents worth.

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I wish to chime in again from a 25 year old perspective if i may.

I attended a high school of about 350 students. Many of the boys were into cars mostly 60s-70s era. I was the only one who drove a car of any vintage (57 Chevy daily in high school). I got alot of criticism for keeping the 235 and 3 on the tree in the car. Most boys would have dropped in a 350 set up and slammed it to the ground. Most guys my age think old cars are unreliable and expensive to maintain, so if they have a old car many would opt for a modern drivetrain. I haven't had any of my classics (daily drivers to show cars driven daily) that haven't been reliable. The issue is that most vintage cars will require work with screwdrivers and sockets and for young guys they would rather plug in a car to a computer or pay a shop to fix it. I don't have a problem tuning a carburetor or adjusting points because I have done it and familiar with it. Most guys my age never have and won't do it to avoid looking stupid because they can't. On the hand that young people just aren't interested in classic cars I know is not true. Granted being one of the only young guys working,driving, and restoring classics in my area I also attended McPherson Auto Restoration program and 85% at least of the students are young. The thing to remember is that the AACA is more known for factory concourse enthusiasts (in my perspective). Heck I like nice drivers/local show cars more then concourse. My 59 Buick is getting a 66 TH400 and 61 3rd member to help it deliver power better (and for driving practicality) so my car can never be a concourse car, nor would I want it to be because I love driving my classics. If it was that perfect I wouldn't drive it and that defeats the purpose of owning a car (to enjoy and drive it). I also recall right after high school several older car collectors helping me out and being very friendly and very interested in my project. It was that kindness and support that got me to attend McPherson, yet that passion is such that for me its a hobby. When you guys see a young guy interested in cars. Help him out, teach him, and show him what his hard work can accomplish. It will make a lasting impression and put more guys in the hobby. :)

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10 4 on making impressions on the young kids.

When I was in elementary school in the early 60's, my gym teacher Mr. Bartha had a white 60 Vette. That car was SO cool! That started it for me. I'm 57 now, and have 4 antique Vettes in my garage.

Last week I had my 61 at a cruise night, and a little boy in elementary school drove past with his dad, and they stopped to look at the cars. He was in awe, and I asked him if he'd like to sit in the Vette. He was speechless as I helped him in the car and let him honk the horn.

Hope he remembers that night, similar to me remembering Mr. Bartha.

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We all liked what we liked, back then, for different reasons. Perhaps the powertrains were secondary to style and such? I can appreciate a 3-speed manual transmission in a '57 Chevy, especially if it's in front of a factory OD system, even on a 235 engine. With the OD, that would have meant a 3.70 or 4.11 rear axle ratio, which would have allowed that measly 6-holer to leave some V-8s in the dust at red lights . . . at least through 1st gear. What fun that could be! Especially since prior to the first "car" four speeds, the 3-speed OD was the hotter set-up.

One thing which is special, to me, is the sounds the "vehicles of my youth" made. The engine sounds, the exhaust sounds, the starter, the doors closing, etc. They were usually specific to particular brands of vehicles (even among the various GM brands!). The way Ford did things, how Chrysler and GM did things, which were usually unique and different, which all affected "the feel" of each of their corporate vehicles (again, even within the GM brands). Some of this was related to their styling and designs, which made them even more special as they might change a little each year, which was something that many of use HAD to keep up with IF we were as into cars as we claimed to be.

The spectacular styling which usually began with the '55 cars and continued into the earlier 1970s certainly was neat and memorable, but it was what was under that sheet metal that got many of our juices flowing . . . even today . . . back then. Everything was EXPECTED to be different, rather than the genericized vehicles we have in more modern times. There were many of those cars which definitely tripped my trigger back then . . . and some that didn't . . . and I can tell you "Why" on both counts, in a respectful manner.

In many cases, it was easier for us to find out these things back then, as it seemed we were somewhat "born with" an inclination to want to learn something about cars. In some respects, modern kids seem to be even farther back on the learning curve than we were. This is why getting them CORRECT and CREDIBLE information is of key importance!

In those earlier times, if we were going to "soup up" our cars, we had to know something about them. You had to network and learn what was best and what was worst about what to do, what could be done, and how to do it . . . IF we wanted our dreams to be fulfilled on available funds. Now, you can go online and find things to purchase that will do that, rather than scrounding salvage yards for things . . . and wave "the magic plastic" . . . to make things happen, usually in about a week. Whether it's modifications or reproduction parts . . . similar situation.

As time has proceeded as it has, some of my priorities have been altered. But that does NOT mean my prior passions for cars are anywhere near depleted. When I see an older car, of most any brand, I remember when it was newer and "just a used car" (and USED as such!). I smile when I look at those multi-colored interiors and wonder WHY we let the beancounters give us only "tan" or "black" trim codes now!

ONE thing I'm glad of is that we can now have the classic styling with modern amenities and propulsion systems. It's amazing what's out there now, that wasn't 10 years ago.

I fully understand the upgrade from the DynaFlow on the '59 Buick to the "Wildcat 401 THM400". Phoenix Trans did such a conversion for one of our BCA chapter members about 15 years ago, in a '62 LeSabre. It made a WORLD of difference in the way the car performed! So much so that the owner's teen-aged son wanted to drive it . . . imagine that, 15 years ago! I suspect an Olds or Pontiac or Cadillac rear suspension can be grafted to the existing frame for a "factory-engineered" result, too. Sound be a really nice result! Just as adding a self-learning EFI system and electronic ignition system can be further upgrades, later on.

One of our prior BCA chapter members and another BCA chapter member came to be "at odds" over the fact the latter had "repurposed" a '79 Cadillac Fleetwood Brougham frame under his '49 Roadmaster Riviera. Other than the OEM Boranni wire wheels and rear sway bar hanging down, as tip-offs that something was not "as it came", it was a completely stock-appearing vehicle with a nice two-tone paint job and custom interior. AND . . . it drove like a '79 Cadillac, too, which those older Roadmasters didn't. Which brought up the "found it under a tree and didn't want it to rust away" vs "Don't do it unless you put it back stock . . ." conversation.

There are MANY sides to that subject and conversation. NOT going to get involved in that!

Hopefully, if we are good mentors of these younger enthusiasts, we can get them keyed-into what made the older vehicles unique and precious to us. Maybe even enough for them to resist the "street rod" approach AND introduce them to the wonders of AM radio programming (which includes many oldies radio stations! www.trueoldies.com ). Because . . . once that suspension is lowered (by whatever means), that engine is swapped out for something more modern, and a modern sound system in installed (other than the OEM look-alike, with modern guts, in-dash radios), much of what made each brand of vehicle unique is lost . . . . other than the visuals. The result might be a nice car, a neat car, and a well-done vehicle . . . but it's not the same. This is a variable situation (depending upon the brand of vehicle and their enthusiast base) depending upon many factors (which can include the vehicle's future worth and ready-saleability) and many "sensitivities" issues.

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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Just realized that this was a 3 year old thread!  But thanks for the FB link - joined :)

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Yes this is old thread but I still hear there are only old people that like old cars. This past weekend I was at the Car and Parts Swap meet in Springfield, Ohio.  I saw lots of under 40 folks with their kids along with even younger couples. Like Gil in the previous post, I let kids sit in my 1912 McLaughlin-Buick at cruises and take them for rides when I can. Last Summer after finally getting the rear end back in after lot of time and cash, I took it to a Cars and Coffee event in Cincinnati near my house. As I got their a bit later in the morning, parking was tight, so a maneuvered in near a Lambo or some super car. The owner was very nervous when I was parking. The McLaughlin got much more attention along with usual questions about right hand drive and the carbide tank. My wife has made signs about those to cut down on the questions. I let all the kids that show any interest sit in the car and try to grab the bulb horn. We have has some success getting younger members in our local AACA club too. It just takes time and effort to get e-mail addresses at events and following up with copies of newsletters or Facebook post.

 

Tom Muth

Cincinnati, Ohio

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I am happy to say that in the time since this discussion started, almost 3 years ago, our local AACA Chapter has added even more Student Members as well as more young adult members. In my local chapter we are still growing the club and have added more young people in the past few years than any time in the past couple of decades. My son and daughter are both still members of AACA and are both judges. My son hopes to be ready to own his first antique automobile in the fairly near future. My daughter is getting ready to graduate from High School and will be less active in AACA for a few years while she attends College. I am sure she will become more active after College, just as my son did. 

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Last fall, the little lake community I live in had a car show.  I had my pre-'16 cars out, a neighbor showed his '39 Buick Century, and there were several newer collector cars ('57 T-bird, 230 SL, 250SE, '64-1/2 Mustang convertible) and some new cars of interest like a Tesla.  We made up cards to put on our cars, and my wife made up information sheets about aspects of car history applicable to the cars on display.  There was a quiz, with two prizes.  One prize was a ride for ice cream in the Century; the other was lessons from me in driving a Model T.  The winning family, with two young kids, chose the ice cream ride, to the joy of the 15-year-old who took second place - he really wanted to drive the T.  This spring, when he turned 16 and got a learner's permit, I started teaching him.  I also had him pull off a wheel to diagnose a brake problem, install the new parts, put the wheel back on, and adjust the brakes. He's having a ball.  So am I!

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As a 32 year old who did not grow up in a car family I started my passion with muscle cars. Growing up in the 90s meant everyone had Honda's. I loved the brute power of V8s. From high school until probably around 2010 I was more interested in "improving" the performance of V8s than the historic parts. Oddly enough, I was most interest in AMCs, which is a funny pairing for that direction. Then I started to gain appreciation for the historic context. Rather than seeing the vehicles so much as competing tools, I started to get interested in why the factory did different things. AMC did lots of things not because they could, but because they couldn't do something else. I was a history buff anyway, so it didn't take long to really find myself seeing old cars as a direct usable link to the past. I own many project cars, and have owned a few show worthy cars, but I've been enjoying the judging aspects of the club the past few years. I have a 3 year old daughter who tells people "daddy likes dirty cars", and she has a good time walking around car shows and "inside car shows" (the Hershey AACA museum). I too wish there was more active interest from my peers. I say active interest, because I think there IS interest. Most folks I talk to are interested in old cars. Even girls I know think they are cool and wish they could drive them. I think it's a bigger economic issue than interest issue. I think the increase in HOAs and apartment rules against repairing cars really hurts the hobby too. Land is expensive and there are less places to hide projects, or even drivers. Less people already have a shop set up so there is less redundancy of use to put towards a big hobby like a car. Tiny house hunters encourages us to buy homes the size of a intermediate sedan... Start with your own families and get young people involved in the chores and fun of old cars. Don't just talk to your clicks at shows, plan shows with more social interaction. We do like to be involved!

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Guess I resemble that remark, remember when the silver-streak crowd in POCI started to be infringed upon by the GTO owners and a few upstarts with newish Can-Ams. Also remember the  eagerly awaited SD-455 in a GTO falling victim to an EPA decree.

 

Kids today are more Mustang/ricer/W-body enthusiasts, all computer cars and more interested in TunerPro vs TunerCat (for ALDL) than Holly vs Carter & a radio upgrade means Bluetooth and not 8-track.

 

Part of the hobby has always come down to price. W-body entry for a solid one is around $2k & have a wide choice of decent 90's, 00's for under $5k (same as $50/car in 1950, $500 car in 1970). Younger enthusiasts rarely have much cash and buy tires from Tire Rack or Tire Kingdom and not from Universal/Coker.

 

Pseudo-reaity shows & forums have taken the place of print mags (and to some extent clubs) and where original paint with factory defects is now valued, resto mods slammed to the ground and with trimmed bumpers & crate engines get the airtime.

 

Guess the message is that the kids are still and always have been out there and a natural evolution has taken place of where they enter the hobby. These are the ones that will have the AACA show winners in 2026 and the only things we can be certain of is that 1) Things will be different and 2) Old timers will still complain about the kids.

 

"O tempora o mores"

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, Frantz said:

 I too wish there was more active interest from my peers. I say active interest, because I think there IS interest. Most folks I talk to are interested in old cars. Even girls I know think they are cool and wish they could drive them. I think it's a bigger economic issue than interest issue.... 

 

I like showing my old cars to people.

I'm sure to tell them how affordable most

antique cars are--the price of regular used cars, or less.

ALMOST ALWAYS, I get a flabbergasted response:

"You're kidding.  I had no idea!"  And then there is hope.

 

The sensational TV auctions, and sometimes the absurdly high

asking prices, are giving a totally incorrect impression of our hobby,

keeping people from looking into it further.

That's why it's so important to share our cars and our knowledge with others! 

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On ‎11‎/‎19‎/‎2013 at 8:55 PM, Terry Bond said:

Like has been said before, the club is undertaking some great initiatives in this regard, but still it so depends on what each of us do individually to help secure the future of our hobby.

The topic surfaces quite often, was wondering if having a separate forum called "youth involvement" might be a good idea. It would be a handy one-stop reference point for all the discussion, including the many great ideas that always come up when the subject is aired. Example, we had a neat activity earlier this year organized by Andy Furhman from Richmond. He's active in Boy Scout leadership and brought a troop down for a camp-out at our Virginia Beach Aviation Museum. Never missing a chance to involve old cars, Andy invited some of our members out to do a history lesson for the group. We had Al Swenson's 1967 Mustang, Susan's 1948 MGTC, Bob Stein's 1937 Pontiac, Neil Sugermeyer's 1931 Willys, and Sam Kern's 1925 Franklin. There was quite a range of auto history and significant technological innovation represented there and the kids all came away with a lot of knowledge and a lot more interest that they started with. Who know - perhaps there's a future AACA leader among them?

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...And I'm still at it years later - Thanks Terry!

 

Putting on the Youth Program for Richmond Region Show 6/18/16 at RIR - don't miss it!

Andy Fuhrman

 

Edited by AC Fuhrman
spelling (see edit history)

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