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1918

AMPERE HOUR METER

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Dear Colleagues,<o:p></o>

<o:p> </o>

Maybe someone will be able to help me by finding any source of information about the amper/hour meter used in Rauch & Lang 1918, as it stopped working and I have no idea how to fix it.<o:p></o>

<o:p> </o>

AMPERE HOUR METER; <o:p></o>

TYPE M. S.;<o:p></o>

NO. 45478;<o:p></o>

AMPS. 60;<o:p></o>

90 AMPERESE CONDS PER ONE REVOLUTION OF …;<o:p></o>

SANGAMO ELECTRIC COMPANY;<o:p></o>

SPRINGFIELD, ILINOIS.<o:p></o>

<o:p> </o>

Ampere meter was used as a gadget to inform the driver/operator of energy consumption left in the batteries. By construction it is something similar into household electricity gauge, but instead of wire coils, which creates magnetic field in order to turn the gauge wheel – the Hg (Mercury) containers are placed.<o:p></o>

<o:p> </o>

I am attaching some photos.<o:p></o>

<o:p> </o>

Thank You in advance for your support.

1918

August

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Hello,

I will start by saying I have not seen or worked on a watt-hour meter from a WW1 era antique electric vehicle. I am a retired electrical engineer with experience with the operation, maintenance and repair of DC electric motors, controls, and metering. i am also a life long car guy.

I am responding to this thread because I will soon be helping a friend get a Baker back on the road. I plan to examine and understand the operation of each component as part of the project.

I will be more than happy to share what I learn during this adventure. I may have some light to share on the watt-hour meter after a few hours with the Baker.

A few thoughts on the watt-hour off the top of my head:

I would think that a DC watt-hour meter would be constructed like a DC motor with the motor speed calibrated to watt-hours.

I would suspect that the armature voltage would be in Milli-volts and produced across a DC Shunt. This would allow the watt-hour meter drive motor speed to be linear to the current being used to run the car. I can envision a small shunt wound dc motor, a current shunt, some resistors for motor field current adjustment, and some sort of clock works gear train for the indicating dial.

I am excited to begin work on the Baker next week. I will try to be of assistance to the antique EV community and post updates and photos as we move along.

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