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Front Springs on a 64 - At wits end!


dhaven64

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Hey Guys,

I have been trying unsuccessfully to install new front springs (same as original and with engine out) but I just can't get the spring to completely set in the lower control arm. As you can see from the pictures, I am using an OEM Spring Compressor tool along with a strap around the frame to the jack. Also, I have hooked another strap through the frame and to the spring for safety purposes. The problem is that as I raise the jack, it still ends up lifting the car and the spring won't set. Also, the jack runs out of lift. What am I doing wrong?? What am I missing?? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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I installed my new springs with the frame freshly restored, engine out, body off, ect. What I did was get a heavy duty threaded rod, some grade 8 washers, and run the threaded rod thru the spring, and thru the shock mounting locations on the upper tower, and lower control arm. Compress the spring, and install in place easily. No need for concrete bags, ect. Been using this trick for years on various projects.

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I installed my new springs with the frame freshly restored, engine out, body off, ect. What I did was get a heavy duty threaded rod, some grade 8 washers, and run the threaded rod thru the spring, and thru the shock mounting locations on the upper tower, and lower control arm. Compress the spring, and install in place easily. No need for concrete bags, ect. Been using this trick for years on various projects.

that's great, however I haven't had any issue with the spring compressor (other than it being a pita) but how do relieve the spring tension once its seated?

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Simply loosen the nut threaded on the rod, easily relieving the tension. Think I forgot to mention using nuts on the threaded rod to compress the spring. This technique works, and it's very safe.

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Simply loosen the nut threaded on the rod, easily relieving the tension. Think I forget to mention using nuts on the threaded rod to compress the spring. This technique works, and it's very safe.

But since the spring is seated flush in the seat i cant get a wrench in there to turn it. It threads up from the bottom

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Don't think your following what I'm describing. The threaded rod feed through the top of the shock mount, down through the spring, down thru the lower control arm. Attach grade 8 washers and nuts to both ends of the threaded rod. Tighten the nut threaded onto the bottom part of the threaded rod which extends down through the lower control arm to compress spring, and then seat spring where it lives. Now loosen the nut to allow the spring to decompress, and it will seat in place.

Keep in mind you have to have the shock removed for this to work, as you are using the shock mounting location openings for the threaded rod.

Sometimes it's difficult for me to describe things in writing. Let me know if you still don't follow, and I'd be happy to explain via voice.

Rob.

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i understand exactly what you're saying, however i've already got the coil seated. i don't want to go through the trouble of unseating it and reseating it again with your method. I just need to know how release the spring tension safely and remove the tool.

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Once you compress the spring enough to mount the spindle, there will be no pressure on the tool. You'll have to take a socket on a long extension up through the shock mount and disassemble the tool.

If you're still having trouble compressing the spring without lifting the frame, try sitting the jack on a large iron plate (or something similar) and attach a chain to the plate and the frame. As you work the jack, the lift will raise the lower A-arm and the pressure of the jack on the plate - attached to the frame - will keep the frame for going up with the jack. I've never done this, but it seems logical.

Ed

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