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whtbaron

Continental from 1925 Moon

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Unfortunately while moving the motor into the shop, I shook about 80 yrs worth of squirrel and mouse nests loose in the bottom which proceeded to fall through the bottom of the oil pan. This pic is the 2nd pile on the floor after I reached in a dragged out what I could by hand. Yes, that's the bottom of the oil pan on my makeshift engine dolly. The long bolts out the back of the flywheel were for a wooden pulley. Apparently after this motor was removed from the Moon it was used to power a saw mill or grain elevator.  I was beginning to have a bad feeling about the parts inside the motor at this point...

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Pistons are the next item on the shopping list, so it was time to break out my new Gearwrench 1/2"  6 point sockets and my favorite homemade breaker bar. I like them. Yes, I could have used an impact, but sometimes I like the feel of doing things manually and I was afraid that those exposed threads on the 90 yr old head studs would snap off. I'm happy to report that I didn't break any. 

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Edited by whtbaron (see edit history)

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At this point I think I learned how Boyd Coddington felt when they unveiled Miss Belvedere. The motor had been stored outside with no spark plugs in the front 3 holes so not too surprisingly, the front piston was cracked from frozen water, as was #3. What surprised me was that there was no piston or connecting rod in #2. Apparently when this motor was put into farm duty as a stationary, they removed #2 piston and ran it as a 5 cylinder. (Edit... that may be incorrect. I now believe what I'm looking at is the wrist pin at the bottom of the bore, and the entire top of the piston has broken up and gone AWOL) . I've opened up some nasty motors in my time, but I must say this is the first time I've seen maggots in one. Note how #4 is the only cylinder that still has carbon in it instead of rust, despite one valve being open. I'm guessing if we can salvage one good piston, that will likely be it. DSCN2181.JPG.6cad08213cb0d847eaa7178ba683dfd1.JPGDSCN2184.JPG.85540681a3fe38be51a8fba5ebcba5aa.JPG

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Edited by whtbaron (see edit history)

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After blowing out the creepy crud, the back 2 cylinders are looking a little better, but getting the pistons out without breaking them is going to be a challenge. It's looking better since I started the WD-40/ Fluid Film soak. Hopefully we can still find some good parts in there, but I'm a lot less optimistic about the crank and camshaft now. 

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LOL... I am actually.... and now I have the floor heat on in the shop to make it nicer to work!  It's a classic love story really. Iron gets separated from oxygen early in the steel smelting process, and spends the rest of it's life trying to be reunited with it's first partner. After a lifetime of trying to fix things in an unheated shop with a gravel floor, this is officially the first of the "old car project" parts to make it in the doors.... I am a little stoked! Now I need to get the Whippet chassis in there before it freezes to the ground for another winter... We're still soaking... 

Edited by whtbaron (see edit history)

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Got curious this afternoon and decided to tip the Moon engine on it's side and have a look underneath. First we had to blow out another shovel full of Rockies remains...

 

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There really is 6 connecting rods in there so  the top of#2 piston is almost completely gone, and it does appear to be a 4" stroke. The crank has been emerged in squirrel remains for some time so it's looking pretty rusty and sad....DSCN2207.JPG.6b3cd6359fe95ae0e06d2a6f807e9a70.JPGDSCN2208.JPG.52f51fb8c8eb2d7bf286dcc92c335a15.JPG

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Strong rust too.... 2 weeks later and I'm still soaking. I've tried heating the outside of the cylinder walls twice, putting the acetylene torch down the coolant ports and melting snow on the piston... no budge. I had to take the rod cap off with the air chisel and I've beat up the rod with the hammer anyway, so I might have to cut the rod below the piston. I'm a little reluctant to do that because then all I have is the remaining rod/wrist pin to hammer on. I wonder if soaking coke down the walls around the piston would dissolve the rust enough to free it up?

 

Edited by whtbaron (see edit history)

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If it doesn't hop out on it's own pretty soon I'm thinking more extreme measures might be called for. I hate to do it but since the block is toast anyway, I might take a cutoff blade around the top of the cylinder and see if I can relieve the metal that is hung up against the rings. 

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Coming into this string of posts late but Jan just alerted me to it with the comment that it is a Moon engine. I looked up the engine # 814-6Y-5467 and found that number in between two other Moons that we know about and it is a Moon 6-40 engine from a late 1922 or very early 1923. The closest engine number that I have is a 1922 and my guess is it is a 1922 just like the one pictured here.DSCN3466.thumb.JPG.e18f575188d18f33f76cc15381a81bbc.JPG

 

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That looks like it alright, but yours is a lot prettier! Over a year later and that piston is still soaking. Unfortunately I chipped the one good one so it's probably not of much use to anyone now. The water manifold looked good when I took it off, but developed a crack down the center in storage. They really are a light and fragile casting. 

 

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