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Taylormade

Brake Drums

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I have recently changed over from steel to cast drums on the Austin. The difference is quite noticeable. One of my friends has a foundry and is doing good business remanufacturing everything from brake drums to cylinder heads. Given a reasonable order he can make most things. Another guy does the machining and finishing. Good stuff.

Ray.

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From what I remember, if I waited too long to replace the brake shoes, The rivets would put grooves in the drum. The grooves then had to be machined out or they supposedly affected the performance and/or the longevity of the new break shoes. Some service stations "turned the drums" as a rountine action when replacing the shoes. I always thought this was a way to pad my bill, and would find another place nest time.

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Some good advise is given in the above brake service guide. My father would skim out a scored drum as part of a general service - provided it had not gone too far - because failure to do so would rapidly spoil the new linings. He would polish the surface as recommended but advise the car owner that it was a short term measure. Doubtless the impecunious would ignore his advise!

Ray.

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Ray,

I have been called a lot of things, but no one has ever called me impecunious. Lucky for you, there is an ocean between us! :)

Just kidding! Just kidding!

Dwight

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No offence intended, Dwight. Absolutely none taken. I am sure you are most generous.;)

Ray.

Edited by R.White (see edit history)

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Here's a drum thickness chart from a 1935 Handbook for Brake Service

Thanks! That is the first piece of period information I've seen on the topic.

Time to get the micrometer out and check the thickness of my 10" centrifuse brake drums.

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Here's a drum thickness chart from a 1935 Handbook for Brake Service

[ATTACH=CONFIG]220686[/ATTACH]

Thanks Dodger. Just one question - what the heck does 110 and 115 mean? Is that hundredths of an inch or what? Sorry, it's Friday and I'm getting old.

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That seems really thin. But like I said, I'm getting old and it's Friday. I'll have to measure mine when I get home, but I think they are thicker than that.

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That seems really thin. But like I said, I'm getting old and it's Friday. I'll have to measure mine when I get home, but I think they are thicker than that.

That is the measurement for steel drums. They are thin which is one reason for my changing to cast iron ones on my Austin. I would be surprised if Dodge used steel brake drums.

Ray

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according to my hollander interchange ,33 chry ct, 32-36 Reo, '32 Chry..will work and '33 Franklin Olympic and 6 brake drums would work..of course on my quest for drums a guy once called me said he could make me new ones for around 2k..of course if your so good at what you do why are you calling people for work? Usually it's the other way around. I think when we do our restorations we do some times over think things ..because we never want to be the guy on the side of the road. I have drove my self nuts thinking of every possible break down and a way to fix it..but then you become so paranoid you don't even want to drive the car. Good thing for my step dad who helps me on the '33 Chrysler..he usually says "If it ain't broke don't fix it."..and "Just because it's old doesn't mean it's worn out." I use to worry about these old mopar brakes because I hang out with a lot of rodders and they always complain about the old cars and the brakes..but if you ever see how these people drive..it's not the brakes that are the problem. My view point change the day I went for a ride in an all original '31 dodge..and that '31 Dodge stopped better then my daily driver '70 Plymouth. anyway good luck with your project ,Benny

Edited by 1933Mopar (see edit history)

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Having seen the scoring (on your other thread) I would skim the drums so as not to damage your new linings. Also, don't forget to polish them with sand paper - don't use emery - then you can be sure of a good braking surface.

Ray.

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according to my hollander interchange ,33 chry ct, 32-36 Reo, '32 Chry..will work and '33 Franklin Olympic and 6 brake drums would work..of course on my quest for drums a guy once called me said he could make me new ones for around 2k..of course if your so good at what you do why are you calling people for work? Usually it's the other way around. I think when we do our restorations we do some times over think things ..because we never what to be the guy on the side of the road. I have drove my self nuts thinking of every possible break down and a way to fix it..but then you become so paranoid you don't even drive the car. Good thing for my step dad who helps me on the '33 Chrysler..he usually says "If it ain't broke don't fix it."..and "Just because it's old doesn't mean it's worn out." I use worry about these old mopar brake because I hang out with a lot of rodders and they always complain about the old cars and the brakes..but if you ever see how these people drive..it's not the brakes that are the problem. My view point change the day I went for a ride in an all original '31 dodge..and that '31 Dodge stopped better then my daily driver '70 Plymouth. anyway good luck with your project ,Benny

My all original '31 DB stops on a dime....it's the skinny tires that slide, but the brakes will definitely stop the wheels. I LOVE Chrysler brakes!

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