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dravid

1931 Plymouth PA brake lines

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Hi All

Thanks for the on going advice. I removed the brake lines from my 31 PA and first saw them to be copper in colour but as i cleaned them I found the copper colour comming off turning them to a silver colour. The same for the fuel line.

What material are these pipes supposed to be made from original, copper or steel. What would you suggest I do going forward.

Thanks

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

I'd suggest making new lines using a cupro-nickel-iron alloy hydraulic brake line which would give the appearance of the original copper-colored lines. Another advantage is that it's much easier to work with than steel, more easily formed, etc. Its fully DOT approved for automotive brake lines. One brand name is Cunifer.

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I'd suggest making new lines using a cupro-nickel-iron alloy hydraulic brake line which would give the appearance of the original copper-colored lines. Another advantage is that it's much easier to work with than steel, more easily formed, etc. Its fully DOT approved for automotive brake lines. One brand name is Cunifer.

+1 What he wrote.

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They were made of steel with a protective copper coating to keep off rust. You can buy the same material at any parts store in 25 foot rolls or in the form of ready made brake lines with the flared ends and connectors already on them.

If the ones you took off are the originals I would be surprised but it would not be out of the question if the car was used in a dry climate or protected from rust by being stored indoors. Normal life for brake lines is 10 to 20 years, although theoretically they could last forever if protected from rust. They have no moving parts to wear out.

How long do you plan to keep the car? Really there is not much point in buying some super deluxe brake lines when the standard ones work well and last indefinitely.

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I used to see the copper colored brake lines for sale in parts stores in the sixties and seventies but I don't remember any OEM that color.

To those of you more familiar with cars of the 30s, is it possible they are the original lines? I suspect they are replacement lines installed 40 or 50 years ago.

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I used to see the copper colored brake lines for sale in parts stores in the sixties and seventies but I don't remember any OEM that color.

To those of you more familiar with cars of the 30s, is it possible they are the original lines? I suspect they are replacement lines installed 40 or 50 years ago.

Early Chryslers used copper brake lines. I think that may have lasted into the era of early Plymouths but am not entirely sure. And I am really not sure if they still used that as late as '31.

My '33 Plymouth had what appeared to be original lines that were definitely steel and definitely in need of replacement. I used Cunifer to make replacement lines on mine.

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+2 what Owen_Dyento said. Those types of lines are used by the big money car manufactures. It works and is easy to use.

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Hi all thanks again for the advice.

The car was from a very dry dusty type area most of its life in operation. It was then put into a wear house in 1973 until I found out and purchased it 2 years ago. The engine and chassis numbers all match as per the registration documents in my country. I also found some white paint markings on the chassis frame when cleaning it to repaint. There is no rust on the chassis frame and body.

See pics for better idea of the condition and I would appreciate any advice to get this car back to original.

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Looks like a good solid car, straight and complete. About as good as they get.

I haven't seen or heard about painted markings on the side of the frame. Maybe that was an export thing. Or maybe it is just that so few cars spent their entire lives in dry areas and the paint on them rusted over.

Looks like you have the original engine number stamped on the frame just above the painted markings. Does it match the engine that is in the car?

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Judging by the rest of the car those may be the original brake lines. If they are not rusted or damaged there is no reason not to use them.

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Under no circumstances should you use copper for brake or fuel lines. Vibration will work harden them and they will crack at some point.

you have a right hand drive car , what country are you in. bob

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Hi I am a junior member located in South Africa.

I would contact your local Dept of Transport to find out what their requirements are to these brake lines are . Here in Australia if your car was manifactured with copper lines than it is ok to use them in your restoration again. Your DMT will tell you whar is required in your country. Bob

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We have a 28 model 72 coupe that has its original copper brake lines. No problems with the lines themselves other than one craked fitting which I found when replacing the master cylinder. Does not leak since these are relatively low pressure brakes, but will be on the winter to do list. As for the lettering on the side of the frame. Chevrolet used frames supplied by A.O. Smith who makes water heaters today. They marked all of their frames with a stenciled serial number, could this frame be made by A.O. Smith too? That might explain the stencil.

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I have a '28 series "72" Chrysler and a '31 PA Plymouth also; the lines on the Chrysler appear to be copper and the previously restored Plymouth are steel. This discussion is educational!

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I assumed that the lines on my 1932 Dodge DL were copper, but when I started the restoration I discovered that they were actually copper-coated steel and had rusted away internally. I have no idea behind the coating - other than a possible rust inhibitor - but steel they were and will need to be totally replaced.

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Best bet would be to replace with cunifer brake lines. This is an alloy of nickel and copper which is very easy to work with and looks almost like copper.

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