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Can anyone identify what this mirror came off of?


Guest freezerburn

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Guest freezerburn

The quality of it made me think to post here with you nice folks. I sure do like it, anyone know if it's even American? Any info would be great i.e. era, make etc. I like the dog bone type pivot mechanism instead of the friction ball and socket type we are all familiar with... Any thoughts welcome. Come on old timers too, one of you have seen one of these I bet! Thanks a ton, freezerburn

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Guest freezerburn

Come on old timers, don't start holding back now! Anybody? Take another peek at the articulating mirror joint. Even an idea of the era it may have been from- or even steam or whatever just give me some hints Have a pleasant week, freezerburn

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I have a similar mirror that I know was purchased in the 1920's as an accessory side mirror clamped to the windscreen post, the mounting arm on mine is quite different to yours but the circular mirror is the same.

The mounting arm on yours looks as though it could have been made to connect to the front door hinge of a closed car as an after market fitting.

So 1920's.

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Guest freezerburn

Thank you for that DavidMc, so 1920's then. Would yours be for an American car by an American company? That response was excellent btw -fb

Edited by freezerburn (see edit history)
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I had this pic in mind (enlarged from an old Formal New York photo). Mirrors on ca. 1925 Cadillac Town car don't quite match yours but maybe help conversation.

I'd say your mirror was a factory option of late 20's/ early 30's although outside rearview mirrors were uncommon then.

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The accessory mirror I referred to was fitted in the 1920's to a Fiat owned by a relative here in Australia but it was not a Fiat accessory. I believe it was made to fitted to a wide range of cars. I do not know where these mirrors were made.

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Guest freezerburn

This is all getting me somewhere folks, anyone else please feel free to chime in. This is a bit difficult to try to track down it's heritage, especially as DavidMc pointed out, it has no number or anything on it anywhere. Any thoughts on how to figure out the source of these... I keep getting the nagging feeling that I'm going the long way around the barn, lol. I don't mind though:) freezerburn

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Guest freezerburn

As a side note this mirror could be identified at a glance by the bulls eye appearance viewed from the front. That may or may not help, who knows:) -freezerburn

Edited by freezerburn (see edit history)
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Guest cben09

The bulls eye ,,would make the flat a bit more rigid,,

taking out some of the shaking so annoying in dirt roads,,

but it takes another operation in spinning,so its a quality piece,

New England,1946-'60,,Rod Blood had a 1914 Packard with

similar mount mirror ,,body-7p touring,Model 1-38 I think..

Generally,Mirrors were not that common on old cars ,as they

are now ,with the increase in traffic,,

I would date it to 1915-25 or thereabouts,,probably in production

even longer,,,sort of like the "ooogah" horn,,

now available in 12volts,,

I agree,,I think it was designed to go on the windshield post

between the top bracket and nut that holds the top to the braket,,

What is the size of the hole,,that may tell something,,

Hope this helps,,,Cheers Ben 'in Maine',,,Where are you??

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Guest freezerburn

CBEN09, do you think they actually spun those ridges (the bullseye) in? I just reread your post, wow! I figured they were formed with a die. Man they really did make the good stuff back then. The very early especially. freezerburn

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Guest cben09

Generally,,,My thot is, it would depend on what town you're in,,and

what machines have open time,,Second consideration is breakage rate

on something with glass,,Do as many operations on one machine,,

I think the glass should be spun in so do ridges and forming at same time,,

If the town makes shoes,,a punch operation is possible,,If they make

lamps and lanterns,,,by all means go for spinning,[Think Amesbury Ma.-Castle-Atwood,Gray Davis]

If down around River St,Haverhill Ma,,I know a fellow who probably would set the job on a

brutal printing press,,if the brass was thin enough,,Its fun to see the job on the wrong

machine 'cause the preferd machine is set for a longer job,,Happens all the time,,

Hope this helps,,,Ben

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Guest freezerburn

Shoot just the ridges unto themselves are a quality and a sign of excellent form and function. Kudos to them for that, any other ideas of the originator of this mirror? Thank you all for you informative observations -freezerburn

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