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Lambracht Auction

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Did anyone go to the Lambracht in Nebraska today? From what I saw on the History Channel today the prices were quite high. Till pretty neat stuff

Chuck Kerls

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Did anyone go to the Lambracht in Nebraska today? From what I saw on the History Channel today the prices were quite high. Till pretty neat stuff

Chuck Kerls

It's being rerun right now as I type this. I've only seen some relatively unremarkable cars auctioned so far (none of the 1-3 mile cars or really rare steel has been on since I started watching). The prices being paid for cars that need total restorations seem to be about what the cars will be worth when they're done. A lot of $25K-$40K four door sedans. I don't get it.:confused:

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Are they the last chance for a guy to buy a new old Chevy...or are they just old cars...that is the question.

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Not anything against the sale, but somehow not quite the exciting items either.

Good solid stuff to start with, but the prices seemed much higher than I would have expected.

I need to just enjoy what I have.....

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I watched the auction (or at least part of it) on the History Channel last night. At first, I thought it might be a parody with fake bids dubbed into the auction. After a while I figured out it was real.

My explanation for the high prices is the current popularity of "original" cars, and the desire for some owners to be "Best of Show." If you are willing to spend enough money, you can purchase a car or truck with 4-20 miles on the odometer, and be a guarrenteed winner in every car show you go to with an "original" class. Unless, that is, someone else is there who was also was at the Lambracht auction with as DJ pointed out "money to burn."

Don't get me wrong. I don't think this is a bad thing. I think it is just another facet of the car hobby.

I'm sure the Lambracht kids thought Daddy was a nut. His grandkids think he was a genius!

Edited by Dwight Romberger (see edit history)

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I never dreamed that those cars would sell for that much money. For some of the cars, you could have bought one fully restored for half the price.

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OK, I followed it on the Internet, and here's my question.....the 1958 Cameo truck was damaged, a beam had fallen on the roof and dented it, busted the windshield...now, someone paid $140,000 for the thing, with 1.3 miles on it.

What does the buyer do now?

If he fixes the damage, the truck is no longer "original".

If he doesn't fix the damage, people will constantly be looking at it as just that, a wrecked truck.

So, aside from the fact that was silly money for the thing, what comes next?

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We were within 25 miles of auction yesterday visiting the grandkids. I thought about going but didn't. After watching some on proxy bid and the History Channel, it's just as well we didn't fight the crowd of thousands of spectators and buyers with deep pockets. Local rumor here is that Jay Leno asked a local motel if he could rent most of it, was denied, got ***** and went back home without staying for the auction. Had he been there, I think the History Channel would have had him on. Maybe it was true, don't know.

link to results:

https://www.proxibid.com/asp/Catalog.asp?aid=68561&p=1&sort=0#cnTb

Rod

Rod

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This is one of my issues with the hobby. Now every T,D and H will think their old junker out in the fence row is worth what these cars brought. So people are over pricing their car, young people wanting to get started can't afford the price, and the car sits and rots! I suppose it's tha American way.

I turned 16 in 1973 when I bought a beautiful maroon 1962 Chevrolet Impala SS for $400. But I was working for $1.50/hr working on a farm when I wasn't in school. How the times are changing.

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This is one of my issues with the hobby. Now every T,D and H will think their old junker out in the fence row is worth what these cars brought. So people are over pricing their car, young people wanting to get started can't afford the price, and the car sits and rots! I suppose it's tha American way.

X2. This has been about THE most over-hyped automotive auction ever. The early edition of the Sunday Washington Post had a full color photo and story above the fold on page one. :rolleyes:

As noted, once again auction fever infects people with more money than brains, ruining it for serious car people. When the general public watches BJ and the like on cable, they all think their POS is worth $10M. Too bad, as these cars then simply rot away waiting to be sold.

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The red & white 1963 Chevy 2dr HT for over $97,000 blew me away. It was not an SS, not a 409. What was I missing that made it bring so much?? Same to be said for the $10k Vega. Must have been auction fever that made the prices so crazy.

I also thought the History Channel coverage team left a lot to be desired.

Terry in PA

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OK, I followed it on the Internet, and here's my question.....the 1958 Cameo truck was damaged, a beam had fallen on the roof and dented it, busted the windshield...now, someone paid $140,000 for the thing, with 1.3 miles on it.

What does the buyer do now?

If he fixes the damage, the truck is no longer "original".

If he doesn't fix the damage, people will constantly be looking at it as just that, a wrecked truck.

So, aside from the fact that was silly money for the thing, what comes next?

I saw an interview with the buyer who said he intends to leave the Cameo exactly as it is, totally untouched.

So in other words, the Cameo will be just as useless and non-functional as the most fabulous trailer queen ever built, only not nearly as attractive.

I saw several more interviews in which buyers said (paraphasing) that the Lambrecht cars are more "real" than restored cars, that these were "just the way the factory built them." I thought; Really? These cars came off the assembly line covered in bird poop, with all their hydraulic systems frozen solid, and weeds visible through the floor of the trunk?

It really is a form of delusion.

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When they auction off my estate (Ha, ha, ha,) I want VanDerBrink to do the job. I assume they created the enormous media hype surrounding this auction and they did a great job for the family. They tapped into the current barn find fever streak and ran it for all it was worth. Looking at the auction results the obvious draw was all the ultra low mileage vehicles but with a few exceptions they were in horrible condition - the whole collection was another example of car hoarding taken to the extreme. I'm sure we will see a number of these cars repackaged for resale quickly to capitalize on the Lambrecht name but some may become the basis for sympathetic restoration. I am definitely the wrong audience for this - if I bought a big block Impala with 2 miles on it I would get it running and start driving it!

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Guest my3buicks

I agree with the comment above that the History Channels coverage left a lot to be desired. The only one that knew much was the bearded one.

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I just spoke with a friend who bought a 1959 Impala 4-door Hardtop with only two (2) miles on it.

He said it still has the orange paint on the exhaust manifold.

What a great find !!

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I've been watching the auction, they are streaming it on the web. Prices are way down now that they are out in the field but.......... A 65 Impala just sold for $4250.

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Well, yes, a great find, but the problem to me is that anything you do to these cars makes them go down in dollars from the inflated value at the sale. In other words, you'd need to store them, dust and warts and all, exactly as found, and either enjoy pride of ownership, or hope someone wanted a piece of the action and would pay you more for it.

My original contention was that the cars inside should never have been moved, they should have been sold in place, inside. Then, at least the new buyer has the joy of taking the vehicle out into the light for the first time. Otherwise, every time an auction worker slammed the door, the originality decreased.

Understand, I'm not in any way a sore loser, I wouldn't have, nor did I, bid on any of this mess. The interesting thing, though, is the publicity. I had my brother in law calling me to see if I was going to the auction. I had a friend who I'm in partial contact for the last 30 years contact me and ask me if I was going to this auction.

I don't think another auction has recently been so hyped.

Congrats to those who bought these low mileage cars, have fun with them......

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David,

Yes, the 1959 will, in all probability, be placed in protected storage, and preserved as a time capsule, likely never to be started, much less cleaned and driven. I'll fill you in when I see you at, or en route to Hershey.

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I can tell you one thing. I deal in NOS parts and after looking at the prices paid for alot of the NOS parts, people were going crazy. You could buy most if not all of these NOS parts in the boxes off ebay and have them shipped to your door almost any day of the week for 1/3 or 1/2 as much. The malibu script would be 50.00 on a good day. 450.00 wow. I have some nos parts for sale as well any takers?

The tape measure for 165? the yard stick I think was 600.00? I think PT Barnum was running this show.

I've had a few survivors. I'll take them over these. I could drive everyone of them and they looked good as well. Shiny paint and chrome, even though it was a bit thin in spots from years of careful care, polishing and proper storage.

Everyone of these that is bought is technically not a new car as they now have an owner other than the dealer, Correct? Unless another dealer bought them they will have to be titled to then be transferred to the next buyer wont they? Atleast to be legitimately transferred.

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

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The only thing that looked very good to me was the VanDerBrink auction outfit. Next time I have a large auction I know who I would like to hire as auctioneer.

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VanDerBrink does a great job. I have attended other auctions she has run and they are first class. She really does a great job for the seller and treats her buyers great as well. Quite honestly, her sales are conducted better than a lot of the "established" collector car auction companies.

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VanDerBrink does a great job. I have attended other auctions she has run and they are first class. She really does a great job for the seller and treats her buyers great as well. Quite honestly, her sales are conducted better than a lot of the "established" collector car auction companies.

Great, great, great group.

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