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Winter Storage AARGH!


dwhiteside64
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Hi everyone,

Unfortunately the leaves are starting to change color again up here in the northern territories, and my attention has suddenly turned to just how I will tuck my precious ride away for the long, cold winter. While I have a general sense of what to do, I would really like to hear from others who choose to store their car for the winter months, as opposed to those who chance the foul weather and drive their classic all year round.

Here is a run-down ofsome steps I heard that I should take in this endeavor:

1) Fill gas tank and run a fuel stabilizer throughout the lines.

2) Inflate tires to 50 PSI (if not putting car on jacks) to eliminate flat spots. Don’t know if this is necessary with radials though.

3) Change oil.

4) Remove the battery and trickle charge it throughout the winter months.

5) Place desiccant packets inside the interior of the car to help fight moisture.

6) Cover ground underneath the car to reduce moisture from reaching the frame.

7) Place traps around your car to control the critter population.

8) Cover the car with a quality cover and store in a garage.

<o:p> </o:p>

Any other recommendations or suggestions will be greatly appreciated!

Edited by dwhiteside64 (see edit history)
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I just tucked my baby in for the winter also. Looking at your list I feel sooo guilty, I've never done any of those. My garage is warm on the other hand, so I'm not too worried about moisture. Covering is also a bit futile as I'm going to be in and out of the car all winter fixing this and that.

But changing the oil already know to get the fresh stuff in there for the winter, that's a good idea. Maybe I'll try.

Lasse

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It's been a long time since I have had this problem but I remember doing it many times back in Illinois. I tried the "Seal and abandon" route at first and found it caused more trouble than it solved. Most of the time I just made sure that antifreeze and oil was fresh and parked it. I kept the battery charged and started it at least once a week, running it long enough to get to fully warmed temperature and at least moving it back and forth in the driveway to exercise the transmission and steering. When the roads were dry I drove it as much as possible. Never used a cover but kept the dust off with a duster and even washed it with the garage heater on if necessary. I never had any problems with this scenario back then and with today's ethanol gas I would be even more concerned about driving the car, using Stabil and running new gas into the system as regularly as possible. Good luck!

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Here's a link to a map that shows stations that have ethanol free gas. If you don't think that StaBil will do enough, you might consider filling up with some ethanol free gas before storing - or if the station is close enough, run it all the time. Not knowing where you all live, I linked a map of the entire U.S. Find where you think you live then start double clicking on the area. The map will get more detailed and pretty soon you might find something close to you.

Ed

http://pure-gas.org/extensions/map.html

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I keep mine ready to go all year round. On a dry day in January you might catch me driving through town on the way to the diner; been keeping the cars out of hibernation for at least 20 years now. I turned 65 yesterday so I don't have to keep them as long as you younger guys.

Anyway, if my cars get a little shabby I'll sell it to a restorer with rose colored glasses and buy one of the nice ones you guys have been saving for me.

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Bernie

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I too try to drive mine in the winter months. When it's dry. I couldn't get the car out of the barn with snow on the ground if I wanted to. I just make sure the coolant is up to par. As far as fuel. I'm hit or miss with stabil. If I remember I use it. I do use ethanol free fuel. I do have a hard time with rodents. We live in a rural area. My barn is 400 ft. from the house. So it can be a challenge avoiding the field mice.

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I guess it's all about perspective. Down here in Texas it's just now starting to cool off enough to where we can drive comfortably during the day again. Spring and Fall are nice. Winter is mild, getting cold enough every once and a while just to remind you it's winter. Summer is a challenge. No winterizing though, ever. PRL

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