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1930 Chrysler 70


Vito24

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Anything and everything. I don't know much about this model at all. I've seen a few pictures but none are the same. I'd just like to know where to research this model so I can dig in and get it as close to original as possible. Thanks

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Hello Vito 24 My wife started by going to the Chrysler Archive web site and buying a reproduction of the owners manual for our 28 model 72 coupe. It will have the maintenance and lube chart which is VERY important on these rigs. Not all Alemite lube fittings use grease. They also have some factory photos. The gal she e-mailed said there was a fire long ago and not all of the info survived. It has been a struggle since this car was put together by a tractor shop who had NO IDEA of how to restore the mechanicals of an old car. We have since bought a parts car and had it shipped up from Nevada. It is a Town Sedan with 22,000 mi., and sidemount fenders. The fellow left it outside for 20 years so the wood is pretty well shot but the mechanicals and sheet metal are nice. We have found some parts contacts so if you need some help e-mail us.

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Thanks a lot Ill be sure to check out that resource right away. The car is on it's way up from down south and I'm planning on driving it the last 200 miles. So I would like to check things I can when I pick it up to TRY and avoid any serious problems on my way.

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I'm not sure a 200 mile drive in an unknown car fresh off the transport truck is a good idea. Maybe you've gone and seen the car and driven it, but if not, the condition of the wiring, electronics and the motor and tranny themselves may be in question. Don't get me wrong, as far as I'm concerned these old cars are for one thing and one thing only - driving! But if you are going to make such a drive, make sure you have a good set of tools, an owner's manual (the old Chrysler manuals are almost like a shop manual), a new set of points and maybe a spare battery. Check the brakes (they will be hydraulic) - check the fittings and hoses for leaks and check the backing plates for any signs of leaking from the cylinders. Check the wiring for fraying, exposed or loose wires. Also, check the tires for any fatigue, dry rot or cracks. Make sure the gas in the tank is still good - modern gas goes bad very quickly, you can usually tell by the smell if there's trouble.

I'm actually not a worry wort, but I've been on enough "first drives" to know what can happen. You've got a great car, enjoy!

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Just bought my first classic. Just looking for places to gather more info on the Model 70 can't find much on the net. Any ideas? Also looking for driving tips since I will have a 200 mile trip to get it home. Thanks

Watch for vapor lock and I wouldn't push the engine too hard, keep close eye on fluid levels. A lot of engine heat will come inside the car and the windshield wiper is worth a darn in rain. If you haven't driven the car, or one like it, allow extra room and time to stop the car. Have a safe trip, we drive our 1930 Model 70 coupe!

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Mr Taylormade gives good advice. I've installed an electric fuel pump so I dont have an issue with vaporlock. I'd be interested in comments by Mr Wolfe - the fuel line run from the vacuum tank to carburetor is well away from exhaust manifold - was there lots of vaporlock in the original systems?

I'd have extra water and engine oil (30W) and watch the temperature. have a supply of the heavy tie-wraps - they are handy for emergencies. cell phone. check the tirepressures and have a jack and tire chocks - just in case. Check the differential level before you start.

Just take it easy. And slow. Kind of wish I was with you as copilot - it'll be a fun time.

Best of luck and wishes - let us know how it went.

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