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Help identifying WWII era car parts - copper head gasket


Guest CarolineW

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Guest CarolineW

Hiya, I'm an archaeologist currently working on a

collection WWII military equipment dumped in Darwin Harbour, Australia, including various

car & light truck engines, parts & accessories. My knowledge of vintage

car parts is faily limited and I was hoping someone here may be able to help me

identify some of the pieces?

First up is a couple of solid copper head gaskets that I cant place and have had no luck identifying after visiting several

mechanics in town. I've attached a photo of one of them - before and after

cleaning. The gaskets measure approximately 668 mm long x 242 wide and bore diameter is

around 105 - 110 mm.

If anyone has any advice or suggestions, I'd greatly appreciate it!

Thank you,

Caroline.

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Conversion metric to inches:-

The gaskets measure approximately 668 mm (26.30”) long x 242 mm (9.53”) wide and bore diameter is around 105 mm (4.13”) - 110 mm. (4.33”)

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A pushrod OHV water cooled engine. You can see the cylinders and the holes for the pushrods. Also the bolt holes and holes for coolant passages. What military equipment used a 4 cylinder or V8 OHV engine? Most I think were flathead (sidevalve). This too points toward diesel.

Did some English equipment use pushrod OHV engines?

This would be a very large engine for the times. The flathead six cylinder Plymouth, a typical car or light truck engine of the time, measured 23" at the cylinder head. The bigger Chrysler / DeSoto six, also used in some trucks, measured 25". This gasket is even longer and it is a 4 cylinder.

What did Caterpillar tractors use for an engine? I know the military used a lot of them in the Pacific theater for building airfields etc.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest CarolineW
Solid copper without an asbestos sandwich would hint at diesel.

Similar layout to REO truck, half a V-8.

Hiya Layden B,

Thanks for your reply, that helps me narrow it down heaps. I hadn't thought of REO truck parts - I'll look into that. We've some other unidentified truck parts so that may open up some good possibilities.

Thanks again :)

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Guest CarolineW

Hiya Rusty_OToole,

Thanks heaps for your reply, really helping me to to narrow it down now. I've been trying to look into any military equipment that may have been out here that used a OHV engine with no luck so far - all the trucks and carriers that I've found seemed to use flathead V8s as you say. I hadn't looked into tractors though - thank you for that, it's a great suggestion, esp given the size of the thing, and we certainly seem to have a wide mix of vehicle parts. I'll check that out!

Thanks again :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

The Apex Trinidad Oilfields of Trinidad, British West Indies used some Ford V.8 flat head half ton pickups in its operations during the war. They were rugged and looked like military trucks and had the AAoogah horn. Made in England and labeled Pilot Ford. I think the were war production only.

trini.

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Guest CarolineW
The Apex Trinidad Oilfields of Trinidad, British West Indies used some Ford V.8 flat head half ton pickups in its operations during the war. They were rugged and looked like military trucks and had the AAoogah horn. Made in England and labeled Pilot Ford. I think the were war production only.

trini.

Hi Trini,

Thank you so much for your reply. I've had a bit of a look at Ford V8 flat heads now after reading your comments and the heads are very similar in size and patterning to the gaskets I found. The standard head gaskets are a little different but it may be that the ones I have were modifications or made specifically for war production vehicles as you say. I'm going to do a bit more research down that line.

Thanks again for your help! :)

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  • 3 months later...
Guest brataccas

Hi, I too have dugup an old head gasket and I cant match it with anything. I found it in scotland at an old WW2 dump. Does anyone recognise what it may be from? I think its made from copper with asbestos in the middle.

cheers

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