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1991 Radio Removal

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I'm looking for a tutural for removing the radio in my 1991 Reatta.

My radio is OK but the cassette does not work.

If possible, I'd be open to buying one with equalizer and working cassette and sending mine back to you as a core refund.

Thanks

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There is a tutorial over at Ronnies site. But basically you need a T15 driver - as every Reatta mechanic should have in their tool box. :) Unscrew the T15 screw at the top of each HVAC vent. (1990 owners also have two above the steering column.) Then pry the instrument panel bezel out. One clip is centered above the HVAC controls, two below the stereo, and one on each side of the steering wheel. Note that the 'chrome' piece is bonded to the black piece. So do NOT try to separate one from the other.

Once the bezel is removed, you will see how to remove the 'stack' containing the HVAC controls and the stereo. (Four screws.) Reach behind and unplug the HVAC module (a little screwdriver is needed to slip into the side of the connector to release the tang holding the plug in.) Then the antenna, and all the power and speaker connectors on the back of the radio.

You can get your original stereo repaired by a number of outfits. Many of us have used M&R with great service. One I want to try is the guy in So Cal that is offering Delco radio repair for $135 via ebay ads. (Has anyone used him?)

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Thanks, I got the bezel off and didn't know how to continue and didn't see room to reach in behind. I didn't know I had to take out the HVAC also. I'll give it a go tomorrow.

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Two screws hold the Climate control module, remove them and pull the module out enough to remove the connector from the back of the module. Then four screws hold the radio unit. Remove them pull the radio out a ways and then unplug the antenna, and the connectors from the back of the radio.

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To disconnect the connector on the back of the climate control, insert a small screwdriver or something similar to spread the two halves, this unlatches the connector.

post-30596-143142160293_thumb.jpg

Edited by Barney Eaton (see edit history)

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Nice that Steve offers this fact, but it would be even better if he would detail how he accomplishes this removal.

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There is no need to disconnect the climate controller when removing and replacing the radio.

Thanks but can you expand a little on how to accomplish this without removing the climate controller? It's a tight fit between the two.

Thanks

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When I installed my new radio and CD player, I didn't have to disconnect the HVAC controller wiring. I did have to remove the 2 screws that held it into the radio/HVAC brackets. There was plenty of slack in the wiring to remove the radio and the HVAC controller was able to rest in the cavity without undue strain on the wiring/connection.

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OK guys - technically you don't have to unplug the HVAC controller module. :)

But for the 10 extra seconds it takes, it makes things a lot easier.

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When someone post here asking for advice, the best answer is the most fool -proof. All of us have done some of these things many times.

However, if you were suggesting something for the "rookie", which method would you recommend?

In the case of working with the radio/climate control stack, I have often found the wires to be caught and it takes some "wiggle" to get the units to come out far enough to get your hand behind them. It is also helpful to be able to see the connectors so that when you reinstall you have a clue where they go.....again with experience that is not an issue.

It seems we often give instruction as if the person had somehow already had experience....

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When someone post here asking for advice, the best answer is the most fool -proof. All of us have done some of these things many times.

However, if you were suggesting something for the "rookie", which method would you recommend?

In the case of working with the radio/climate control stack, I have often found the wires to be caught and it takes some "wiggle" to get the units to come out far enough to get your hand behind them. It is also helpful to be able to see the connectors so that when you reinstall you have a clue where they go.....again with experience that is not an issue.

It seems we often give instruction as if the person had somehow already had experience....

True! Actually, the real answer is how difficult it is to get the plug back in vs doing the job leaving it plugged in. Some plugs are easy to get out and challenging to get back in. Only someone with experience can answer this.

I've been thinking of replacing mine as well. It seems to work ok but the sound fades in and out about once every 10 seconds. Speed is constant but goes quiet then normal then quiet, etc. Not totally quiet but change is enough so that I can't listen to tapes (or anything with a cassette adapter). Radio, equalizer, everything else works great!

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Thanks to all for your advice. I have options I was not aware of.

My earliest posts here requested advice on removing a cassette stuck in my 1991 Reatta convertible, (Black Beauty), as I was tempted to use a butterknife to rescue my Todd Rundgren tape.

With excellent advice from Barney, I removed & disassembled the unit successfully retrieving the tape. Realizing my next tape may shred from age, I decided to acquire an adaptor-tape to play tunes from external sources thru the cassette player. It cost $5 at WALly-world. I can even use my turntable in my ragtop now! Thanx, Barney!

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The horns installed themselves on impact. Scrapping the rest of the cow off the front of the car was the hard part. LOL

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My earliest posts here requested advice on removing a cassette stuck in my 1991 Reatta convertible, (Black Beauty), as I was tempted to use a butterknife to rescue my Todd Rundgren tape.

With excellent advice from Barney, I removed & disassembled the unit successfully retrieving the tape. Realizing my next tape may shred from age, I decided to acquire an adaptor-tape to play tunes from external sources thru the cassette player. It cost $5 at WALly-world. I can even use my turntable in my ragtop now! Thanx, Barney!

Welcome home.... have missed your posts... Jim

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