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Roger Frazee

What Does the TC Stand For?

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I may be buying a '91 TC soon, and am curious what the lettters TC stand for? Also, are there any pitfalls I should be aware of before purchasing?

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Touring Cabriolet? About the same as any 24 year old car. I'm guessing yours will be the v6? Post up where you live and someone might have a mechanic that is familiar with the mechanics of the car. Remember the people that worked on these are probably retired by now.

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Thanks Bill. The car I am looking at is an '89 2.2L Turbo. Are parts hard to find for this engine? I expect to be changing the timing belt immediately.

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On my 1989 factory window sticker it is "Turbo Convertible" I think It changed for the V6

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On my 1989 factory window sticker it is "Turbo Convertible" I think It changed for the V6

TC stands for Touring Cabrolet is good, but personally I like the TC stands for Targa Convertible theory

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Thanks Bill. The car I am looking at is an '89 2.2L Turbo. Are parts hard to find for this engine? I expect to be changing the timing belt immediately.

I have the same engine. So far, no problems - I think it's a variation of a Dodge engine of the same era. The brake system is the big gotcha....

John

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It's almost the same as the Dodge Daytona TII engine. (heavier crankshaft, detuned computer) The early 89s were 88 engines. The brakes are ok. You just have to remember when getting new axles that they have the TC abs tone wheel on them. OR just take it to a rebuilder in a larger city. The one in St. Louis is great. $100 to rebuild it while you wait.

It's better than owning a real Maserati of that vintage. A few of them wind up with Chebbie engines because of the costs.

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I always thought it was touring Corsa.

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Google searched Chryslers website and they said it stood for touring convertible.

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Google searched Chryslers website and they said it stood for touring convertible.

I win! Italian translation = cabriolet! I don't what the word for touring is in Italian. On second thought cabriolet might be French.

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Thanks Bill. The car I am looking at is an '89 2.2L Turbo. Are parts hard to find for this engine? I expect to be changing the timing belt immediately.

Buying an '89 2.2L with how many miles 'showing' on the odometer? If the odometer doesn't work, who knows how many miles it really has. I have an '89 with over 260K miles, so it isn't that these engines are troublesome, as long as they are maintained properly. Mine runs like a well oiled clock.

You may want to do more than a timing belt on a high mileage engine. It all depends on what kind of maintenance it has seen over the years.

If you are buying one in the rust belt, CAREFULLY inspect everything on the bottom side. These cars are very susceptible to rust which includes both fuel and brake fluid lines. Not to mention everything else as well. I have pictures of just how bad a car from Ohio can get.

The ABS system is unique to this model in a Chrysler product and parts are expensive.

We who own these rare cars do really enjoy them, but unless you buy a really well kept car, you may find as others have, that it is costly and a lot of work to restore this car.

Tell us as much as you can about this prospective purchase and we can make a better evaluation.

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