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New Wheels for old Speedster


gastruk
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Did a quick Google search for the wheels you are considering and came up with this. Nice wheel, but I think it's a more modern look than most of the posters here are interested in. A lot of people here are trying to assemble speedsters with vintage parts, it's just a question of what you personally consider to be vintage. If you're getting into a more hotrod look, you may have better luck enquiring on the HAMB.

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post-47067-143142158131_thumb.jpgIf you look around on the web, some places define vintage speedsters as being pre-1928, the title for this discussion suggest "pre-war" which I assume means prior to 1942, but if you read the other threads there has been a considerable amount of latitude given to this group of discussions ( some people want modern steering, or brakes to make them safer, others are looking at newer 6 cylinders for dependability) which I personally agree with. Speedsters really were the original race cars, and the original hotrods long before the term was coined. In the end, it's your car and I think you should do what you want to it to make it the way you enjoy it personally.
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Hmmm... or perhaps the original administrators for the forum were hoping we'd focus on parts built before the First World War.... lol... so confusing when we've never really been without a war! Regardless, I'm all for having fun with old cars, restored or otherwise... at least we're keeping them from being turned into Coke tins.

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Take a look at these on "The Old Motor"

pierce arrow cast wheels | Search Results | The Old Motor

Though I bet they are fantastically rare. I know I've never seen any. But, if you had a big enough lathe and access to a foundry it would be possible to make some.

There is an American LaFrance speedster around RI that has cast aluminum wheels. Back in the 70s I met the man who built it. He made a pattern of 3 spokes and the felloe band and cast 4 pieces for each wheel (I'm not certain I got those numbers right...I didn't count the spokes). He then machined the interfaces at the hub and assembled them into the strongest "wooden" wheels I've ever seen. I have a picture of it somewhere.

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