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cjp69

Need help with SCO paint code 1022 on a 68 Electra!

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Ran into a guy last night with a 68 Electra with an SCO paint code of 1022. Not sure if it had a painted or vinyl top at one time as the top was in primer. The car appeared to be Buckskin in color though, which was a Riv only paint color, which would explain why it was an SCO car.

Curious what paint code appears on the cowl tag of a Buckskin Riviera???

here is the Electra's cowl tag.

Any help in figuring out this paint code is appreciated!

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post-40529-143142141655_thumb.jpg

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For some reason, I would expect something in the format "12U" rather than a 4-digit number for "Paint", even if it was a "Special Color Order" (SCO?).

In many cases, factory vinyl top cars were not color-coated on the areas covered by the vinyl roof fabric, just primered as they came from the "paint prep" operation.

In general, a color on a Riviera would have the same "Paint" designation regardless of what (same brand) vehicle it might be on. It would be the "Sales" and "Model codes" which would restrict it to one carline or not, as a "standard color". IF a dealer knew how to check the right boxes on the sales order, PLUS how to work the "Fleet Color" availabilities, it was not problem to get an Electra-specific, or LeSabre-specific color on other Buick models . . . same with other GM divisions, too.

When you go to www.paintref.com, you'll find the paint codes for vintage vehicles. I found the link from www.wildaboutcarsonline.com in their Buick Technical links under "Paint & Body" (once I got to that area).

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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First, SCO = Special Car Order. This was the method of Buick doing something out of the ordinary such as paint, options, etc. Chris, you should recall that all 1971 GSX's were SCO's and their body number was very low, as if they (Buick) held back body numbers for special stuff. My personal 1971 GSX is body number 1027.

To find out what SCO 1022 was, you will have to have historical documents that I believe are no longer available. Somewhere in time, there was a description to "Paint SCO 1022" such as, "hemi orange" or a Riv only color for 1968. Back in those days, one could order just about anything you were willing to pay for.

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Guest my3buicks

Have you searched for a build sheet? That may give you some answers.

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Another interesting aspect of this particular Electra 225 is that it was delivered without a radio and still has the factory plate covering the area of the instrument panel where the radio would have been installed. I doubt many Electra 225's were sold without any radio option.

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First, SCO = Special Car Order. This was the method of Buick doing something out of the ordinary such as paint, options, etc. Chris, you should recall that all 1971 GSX's were SCO's and their body number was very low, as if they (Buick) held back body numbers for special stuff. My personal 1971 GSX is body number 1027.

To find out what SCO 1022 was, you will have to have historical documents that I believe are no longer available. Somewhere in time, there was a description to "Paint SCO 1022" such as, "hemi orange" or a Riv only color for 1968. Back in those days, one could order just about anything you were willing to pay for.

Yep, I knew what the SCO stood for (as the 71/72 converts with buckets were SCO cars too), but the number part confused me. I guess it could have been SCO for another reason, although I am pretty sure the radio delete wouldn't be it.

I was hoping maybe someone has a buckskin Riv so I can see the color on a car rather than a paint chip, and also see what the trim tag says.

Although I suspect like Brad says, 1022 is a paint code for a color, and the cross reference is forever lost....

Thanks, Chris

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Guest my3buicks

If it had been a 68 Riv color it's SCO paint code would have been the same code as used on the Riv's = 1022 would not been a color code used on Buicks - more than likely, a color from another company such as Ford or Chrysler - custom colors were usually left blank after the SCO - but again, the build sheet would often have paint information for the SCO cars on them handwritten.

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By the way, Chris, I had forgotten that my wife shot a photo of Dean's '68 Riviera while we were in Baker City last May. I'm quite sure that this is the Buckskin color on Dean's Riviera. EDIT NOTE: I now understand that this color is NOT Buckskin. Please read on through this topic.

8722700538_82499215b7_b.jpg

Edited by Centurion (see edit history)

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Guest BJM

Brian, thanks for posting that high resolution shot. Some folks think these tan metallic colors are not very exciting but they look very nice when in top shape condition. I think the negatives on them were that they were sprayed on an awful lot of 20's and 80's cars that soon went downhill condition wise. BUt in this condition they are beautiful colors.

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Guest BJM

I agree get the build sheet. I can't seem to upload my copy right now, but it's on there. Mine was under the back seat.

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I will concur on the "tan metallic" colors. When new, they look very good on "the right car", not to forget about the matching interiors. But unless you have a taste for them, they can be "just another tan color".

I also concur on the Build Sheet issue. It IS unusual to see a GM color designation from that era in "4 digits" . . . although the current "WA" numbers are four digits (After the WA and prior to any possible suffixes).

Just some thoughts,

NTX5467

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This same question was posed in a duplicate post in the Riviera sub-forum which I responded to, but I'll respond here as well since this thread has taken off. I have a Buckskin '68 Riviera. The paint code on the body tag is "X2", the "X" is the paint color (Buckskin) and the "2" is the top color (black) vinyl. No disrespect intended, but the car in Centurion's post #8 does not look like Buckskin, at least it does not look like my car. '68 Riv Buckskin is not a metallic color, it is more like a coffee color, that looks light post-47069-143142148636_thumb.jpgtan in sunlight. See picture of my car attached.

Edited by dcdpgh
spelling error (see edit history)

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Dan, thank you for setting me straight regarding the color. I only thought that the car I posted was Buckskin because it looked like the color visible in the online color charts. Your car is beautiful, and exactly what we needed to see.

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Guest my3buicks

Dan's car is even more beautiful in person - the picture really does not do the color justice, as he said, it is more tan.

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Thanks for the complements Brian and Keith. Being a Riviera only color in '68, you almost never see it. I've only seen one other in person. Brian - those paint samples sure can be misleading, especially when you look online as you say you did. I have an original 1968 Buick paint color brochure, and I can tell you even in person the Buckskin paint sample is slightly off from my car's paint. Either the pigment in the sample has deteriorated, or the paint on the car has changed over time, but likely both.

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