High Desert

My father's first car, 1957 Roadmaster Convertible, makes it to my worshop finally!

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That looks like pot metal the way it's cracked.  If it is, you might try this guy.  Disclaimer: I know nothing of him other than I've heard his name.

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On 6/5/2020 at 10:40 AM, High Desert said:

Well, shoot.. 

 

I was cleaning the power steering pump to disassemble and re-seal when I found the reservior manifold is destroyed. It looks like someone installed the lid bolt with way too much torque, breaking and cracking it in multiple places. 

 

Anyone have a decent replacement I could purchase? I don't think I can fix this! 

 

 

If you don't find one on here soon, PM me.  I am pretty sure I know where you can get one.

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Back to the nailhead while I await some generator and power steering parts. 

 

Since the fuel pump cam was riveted to the original camshaft drive grear, I had been pondering a secure way to attach it to the new gear. Luckily, one of the two rivet holes aligned with a 1/4 hole in the new camshaft drive gear. I "just" needed to drill the rivet hole to 1/4" on the fuel pump cam and weld a 1/4" stud. 

I emphasized the word "just" because the fuel pump cam is hardened steel. I was lucky that I had a full carbide 1/4" drill bit and a drill bit sharpener. I got through it with only three bit sharpenings.

 

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Reading the manual, looking for the cam gear torque value, it devalues everything I just did. 

Paragraph 9 says to simply bolt the loose fuel pump eccentric to the end while aligning the keyway. I guess they only had them riveted on from the factory so the engine builder didn't forget the fuel pump eccentric. 

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Can someone tell me what this fuel filter connection should look like for the alternate glass-bowl filter setup? I'm sure it is super simple, I just need to get the parts or something similar.

Thanks to everyone for all the help to this point. This has been an excellent knowledge resource and I don't know how far I would have made it without this forum.

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, Caballero2 said:

I hope this helps.

 

 

 

That is exactly what I was looking for. Thank you!

 

Looks like a type of bulkhead fitting.

 

Edited by High Desert (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)

I pulled the air cleaner assembly from the dwindling pile of car parts. It was filled with rust and hard tarlike coating which I assume was oil at one time. Not sure if it was salvageable, it soaked in the solvent tank for a few days and it didn't make a dent in the tar. It then went to an outside tank and soaked in a mix of acetone and gasoline. That softened it up! 

For rust removal on this thin metal, I'm using electrolysis. Wish I took better "before" photos but am surprised with how well the center portion turned out yesterday (photo shows still-wet paint). The main housing is in the bath today and getting good results so far. 

 

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Edited by High Desert (see edit history)
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A little soapy water and scrubbing with an SOS pad reveals mostly clean metal. I like how electrolysis also removes paint. 

The rust was most aggressive on the underside of the oil reservoir, and the sunlight helped me locate any pinholes. I found only one (at the tip of my finger) but I'll be checking for other thin spots to add sealant to before painting. 

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Engine and associated bracketry is painted! The distributor shown here is the original junker, used to just plug the hole. The manifold is just resting in place. I still need to do some cleanup work to the carb surface. 

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Couple of the typical issues with new parts.

First, the new water pump and the associated pulley have some slight interference that meant I needed to remove some cast iron in a specific spot. It is a tight fit with the original pump too though. 

 

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The second issue is with the new motor mounts. They have a coarse thread welded nut that should be fine thread. 

I'm going to remove them and weld in the correct nuts. 

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Wouldn't it be easier to change bolts?

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1 hour ago, KongaMan said:

Wouldn't it be easier to change bolts?

I was thinking of buying some grade 8 coarse thread bolts for it. I don't know why Buick engineers wouldn't have used coarse thread there in the first place but I'm concerned they thought that this connection needed the additional torque retention associated with fine thread. 

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11 hours ago, lancemb said:

Did they originally have nuts welded on?

I think so. The old engine mount has green paint remnants which leads me to believe it is original, painted with the engine. It has a welded square nut though, not hex like the new mounts. 

 

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5 hours ago, High Desert said:

I think so. The old engine mount has green paint remnants which leads me to believe it is original, painted with the engine. It has a welded square nut though, not hex like the new mounts. 

 

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Yep, confirmed the same on mine today.  Getting to nearly the same point on the coupe.

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I went to get belts for the engine today. The guy asked if I have the "early" AC or the "late" AC. 

I guessed wrong when I said "late". 

I do the same thing every time I plug in a usb on my computer. 

Back tomorrow for the right belts. 20200613_213542.thumb.jpg.fcec5aed2332198e193b1f43cb87745e.jpg

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1 hour ago, High Desert said:

I went to get belts for the engine today. The guy asked if I have the "early" AC or the "late" AC. 

I guessed wrong when I said "late". 

I do the same thing every time I plug in a usb on my computer. 

Back tomorrow for the right belts. 20200613_213542.thumb.jpg.fcec5aed2332198e193b1f43cb87745e.jpg

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What method are you going to use to attach the engine to the hoist?  Looks like your bolt holes are all used up.  Lifting straps?  I've successfully used that method if so...

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8 hours ago, lancemb said:

What method are you going to use to attach the engine to the hoist?  Looks like your bolt holes are all used up.  Lifting straps?  I've successfully used that method if so...

I had made this lift plate when the engine was removed. I'll remove the carburetor to use it again when the engine goes back. 

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47 minutes ago, High Desert said:

I had made this lift plate when the engine was removed. I'll remove the carburetor to use it again when the engine goes back. 

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Excellent!  I actually just ordered a pre-made one.  May have to make my own holes but we'll see.  I'm not going to build mine up quite as much as you did before installing, but a few of the exhaust manifold bolts are tough to get to once installed at the least.

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On 6/12/2020 at 1:24 PM, High Desert said:

I was thinking of buying some grade 8 coarse thread bolts for it. I don't know why Buick engineers wouldn't have used coarse thread there in the first place but I'm concerned they thought that this connection needed the additional torque retention associated with fine thread. 

Can you use a longer bolt and spin a second nut onto the end of it?

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2 hours ago, lancemb said:

Excellent!  I actually just ordered a pre-made one.  May have to make my own holes but we'll see.  I'm not going to build mine up quite as much as you did before installing, but a few of the exhaust manifold bolts are tough to get to once installed at the least.

You are doing it right. I'm mostly preforming the thorough build-up because of the significant chunk of time that that passed between when it was torn down and now. Making sure I have all the right hardware, gaskets, etc.. Parts can get misplaced despite best intentions. 

Some parts will be coming back off before the engine goes back in for break-in, like the fan. Some parts like the AC system will wait even longer. Bolting the AC unit to the beast may just break the engine stand! 

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Posted (edited)
44 minutes ago, KongaMan said:

Can you use a longer bolt and spin a second nut onto the end of it?

I think that would work too. I replaced the nuts yesterday already though.

The car's frame has two (one for each side) welded fine-thread nuts to receive the motor mounts. The motor mounts each have a fine thread nut, so the four identical mounting bolts have a two-in-two-out configuration.

I was imaging future me, under the car, trying to reinstall the motor and wondering why the fine or coarse thread bolts won't go in. 

Cutting off the old nuts and welding on the new ones is only a ten minute fix. I made sure to keep a bucket of cooling water nearby while welding to keep from melting the rubber. 

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Edited by High Desert (see edit history)
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