Sign in to follow this  
Eldovert

Best way to ship fenders across country ?

Recommended Posts

I have a set of 1930's Buick fenders I need to ship from Portland,OR to Mississippi.

I would be interested to know how other members have solved this problem.

Thank you,Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Benefits of AACA Membership.

Looks like Greyhound..a lot cheaper than the big shippers...Thanks Keiser!

Rob, if you donate the Buick..I will drive them there!

Cheers,Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greyhound is the most affordable, but it does have some issues of which I became familiar with, the hard way. I had a pair of fenders sent here (Seattle area) from Ozark, MO. Things I discovered were: 1. the insurance limit on Greyhound is $300. 2. the tracking is very poor, if at all and you are pretty much at their mercy. and 3. with larger packages, they ship on a per space basis. In other words, if they stop in HoleintheWall, UT and need the space for suit cases, they will pull your fenders. Then they are 'supposed' to place them back on the next bus through. However, in my case, it took exactly 30 days for my fenders to make the trip and the Greyhound agent said he has no idea where they were or why it took so long. The box looked like it became a coffee table somewhere in the Midwest. When I sold two rear doors for a '36 panel truck to a fellow in OH, he went ahead and paid $200 (compared to $75) to ship it FedEx and put better insurance and tracking on it. Best of luck to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a pair of inner fenders and a core support shipped from California to Ohio,do not get in a hurry as they go on a adventure to get to you. The box will be stamped on all the states its visited on the trip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sent a pair of 41 Plymouth rear fenders on Greyhound to someone over a year and a half ago. He still has not gotten them and Greyhound only refunded us $100.00 and we had to wait over a year to get that back.

It's kind of hard to lose a package that is almost 5 feet tall and 2 feet wide but they did a great job of doing that.

Yes they are cheap(est) but I'd be wary. I would NEVER send anything through them again...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I had a pair of inner fenders and a core support shipped from California to Ohio,do not get in a hurry as they go on a adventure to get to you. The box will be stamped on all the states its visited on the trip.

The 'stamps' would represent every time it was taken off the bus and put on a different vehicle...If it is a part that is very rare with the possibility of not finding another, I would spend the money for FedEx and try to minimize your risk!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Greyhound is the most affordable, but it does have some issues of which I became familiar with, the hard way. I had a pair of fenders sent here (Seattle area) from Ozark, MO. Things I discovered were: 1. the insurance limit on Greyhound is $300. 2. the tracking is very poor, if at all and you are pretty much at their mercy. and 3. with larger packages, they ship on a per space basis. In other words, if they stop in HoleintheWall, UT and need the space for suit cases, they will pull your fenders. Then they are 'supposed' to place them back on the next bus through. However, in my case, it took exactly 30 days for my fenders to make the trip and the Greyhound agent said he has no idea where they were or why it took so long. The box looked like it became a coffee table somewhere in the Midwest. When I sold two rear doors for a '36 panel truck to a fellow in OH, he went ahead and paid $200 (compared to $75) to ship it FedEx and put better insurance and tracking on it. Best of luck to you.

This is information is absolutely spot-on.

I've shipped several times with Greyhound (usually per buyer request) and can tell you this:

Package shipments will get bumped for passenger luggage, which means your package could end up pulled off the bus at any point along the route. And, keep in mind that Greyhound routes don't always "make sense," so what you think the route is vs. what the route really is could mean that your package was pulled off the bus at a town that seems to be 60 miles out of the way.

Also remember that Greyhound stops aren't necessarily bus depots. Many stops, especially in small towns and along rural routes, are McDonald's restaurants, hotels, hardware stores and the like. If you're shipment gets bumped at one of these stops, good luck tracking it down and don't expect to see it anytime soon. Your box could literally sit outside, unsecured at some stops. Lots of stops have no staff, no Greyhound phone line, and no regular schedule. And since their tracking is really horrible (if you're used to UPS, FedEx, etc. you'll go nuts), you pretty much need to put your package on the bus and say a prayer that it will eventually come out on the other end.

If your stuff gets "lost" and eventually "found" along the way (maybe the label was ripped off or similar), it will end up at the Greyhound headquarters in Dallas, TX at a facility they have downtown. It will sit there until YOU decide to go on the hunt for it. They won't go looking for you, that's for sure. It's not exactly the kind of place you want to spend any time trying to get someone to give a darn about tracking down your shipment of car parts. Been there, done that...just not for car parts. Not a pleasant experience though my item was eventually located and was ok.

An interesting shipping method that has not been mentioned is shipping by rail. I've shipped with Amtrak several times and it's been great. Very inexpensive, liberal size and weight limits, and FAR less handling along the way than with Greyhound. They have a much, much better tracking system that is "commercial grade," if you can call it that, and quite honestly it's much more pleasant going to the train station that it is going to the bus depot. Also, with Amtrak you also don't have to worry about getting bumped or having your package untraceable while held in transit for some indefinite period of time. On the flip side, Amtrak's package shipping network is far more limited so you have to ship city to city. Depending on your proximity to a "big" city with Amtrak package service, it could be a headache. I have found that this usually takes no longer than ground service from UPS, FedEx, etc.

Other options exist, of course, depending on the size of the item and how you're able to pack it, such as one of the many LTL freight lines in addition to the mainstream commercial carries like FedEx, UPS, DHL and so on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies.

I might go along for the ride with these fenders. I will just cut a hole for my head and if I see something I don't like I will pop my head out and say "I wouldn't do that if I were you!!"

I wouldn't mind seeing broken fanbelt,Oklahoma as well. I wll explore the Amtrack option..looks like they will get within 50 miles of my destination.

Cheers,Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, we all learned a few things today. I like the idea of a ride-along, to be sure the my parts get to their destination, although I might buy a seat on the bus. Heck, then I'd buy seats for the fenders, too, and we could play cards all the way to Radiator Springs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you know someone who has a commercial Fedex account I'd go that way.

I bought a Model T front fender on ebay and it was shipped via Fedex.

All the seller did was wrap it in a LOT of that sticky clear plastic.

I think think shipping was under $50 from NE MN to central WI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This is information is absolutely spot-on.

I've shipped several times with Greyhound (usually per buyer request) and can tell you this:

Package shipments will get bumped for passenger luggage, which means your package could end up pulled off the bus at any point along the route. And, keep in mind that Greyhound routes don't always "make sense," so what you think the route is vs. what the route really is could mean that your package was pulled off the bus at a town that seems to be 60 miles out of the way.

Also remember that Greyhound stops aren't necessarily bus depots. Many stops, especially in small towns and along rural routes, are McDonald's restaurants, hotels, hardware stores and the like. If you're shipment gets bumped at one of these stops, good luck tracking it down and don't expect to see it anytime soon. Your box could literally sit outside, unsecured at some stops. Lots of stops have no staff, no Greyhound phone line, and no regular schedule. And since their tracking is really horrible (if you're used to UPS, FedEx, etc. you'll go nuts), you pretty much need to put your package on the bus and say a prayer that it will eventually come out on the other end.

If your stuff gets "lost" and eventually "found" along the way (maybe the label was ripped off or similar), it will end up at the Greyhound headquarters in Dallas, TX at a facility they have downtown. It will sit there until YOU decide to go on the hunt for it. They won't go looking for you, that's for sure. It's not exactly the kind of place you want to spend any time trying to get someone to give a darn about tracking down your shipment of car parts. Been there, done that...just not for car parts. Not a pleasant experience though my item was eventually located and was ok.

An interesting shipping method that has not been mentioned is shipping by rail. I've shipped with Amtrak several times and it's been great. Very inexpensive, liberal size and weight limits, and FAR less handling along the way than with Greyhound. They have a much, much better tracking system that is "commercial grade," if you can call it that, and quite honestly it's much more pleasant going to the train station that it is going to the bus depot. Also, with Amtrak you also don't have to worry about getting bumped or having your package untraceable while held in transit for some indefinite period of time. On the flip side, Amtrak's package shipping network is far more limited so you have to ship city to city. Depending on your proximity to a "big" city with Amtrak package service, it could be a headache. I have found that this usually takes no longer than ground service from UPS, FedEx, etc.

Other options exist, of course, depending on the size of the item and how you're able to pack it, such as one of the many LTL freight lines in addition to the mainstream commercial carries like FedEx, UPS, DHL and so on.

What you are describing is exactly what brokered multi-car auto transport is .... whistling.gif

Jim drive.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this