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Does it look like the new $259 Griffen radiator is going to fit in the 1930 Buick radiator shell?


Dwight Romberger
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Glad to hear of your progress. We have been at the Nationals and Pre-War after tour. And are in awe of your resoursefulness. After 4 bouts of overheating on the way out. We would like to see how these techniques will help this problem. Larry

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There is joy in Mudville!

It looks like the new Griffen radiator has solved my overheating problem.

Normal driving seems to be around 160 degrees. Downhill it will dip down to 140. Sitting at idle for a long period of time---(15 minutes) the temperature creeps up to 190 but no boiling over. This may be normal?

I am going to move the fan closer to the radiator tommorrow and see if that makes a difference.

Water just pours through the radiator now. If you look down the radiator fill opening it looks like a rapids. Before, it was hard to tell if the water was moving at all.

The installation was easy (even for me). I only had to cut two small tabs off the sheet metal that secured the old radiator and a slender strip off of the louver device. And, I realized later it didn't really have to cut the piece off the louver device.

I will post step-by-step photos and commentary.

I drove it 5 or 6 miles today. First time it has been away from home in 4 years.

Engine is running rough, rolling as if it is going to stop at all speeds. It was smooth before so I think I may have loosened some dirt while replacing the fuel tank and fuel lines and it is in the Marvel.

Right now I am just glad it is not pegging the temperature gauge anymore.

Dwight

Edited by Dwight Romberger (see edit history)
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Hi Leif,

Griffen is an American company that has been making aluminum radiators for 30 years. They make direct-fit, universal, high-performance and custom made-to-order radiators.

Home page: Griffin Performance Aluminum Radiators

Radiator catalog: http://www.griffinrad.com/catalogs.cfm

The Universal radiators were of the most interest to me: http://www.griffinrad.com/buy_online/catalog/index.php/cPath/34

If I were to do it again, I would have them modify the inlet and outlet locations slightly on the radiator I purchase to match the original radiator. They offer that option.

Dwight

Edited by Dwight Romberger (see edit history)
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There is joy in Mudville!

It looks like the new Griffen radiator has solved my overheating problem.

Normal driving seems to be around 160 degrees. Downhill it will dip down to 140. Sitting at idle for a long period of time---(15 minutes) the temperature creeps up to 190 but no boiling over. This may be normal?

I am going to move the fan closer to the radiator tommorrow and see if that makes a difference.

Water just pours through the radiator now. If you look down the radiator fill opening it looks like a rapids. Before, it was hard to tell if the water was moving at all.

The installation was easy (even for me). I only had to cut two small tabs off the sheet metal that secured the old radiator and a slender strip off of the louver device. And, I realized later it didn't really have to cut the piece off the louver device.

I will post step-by-step photos and commentary.

I drove it 5 or 6 miles today. First time it has been away from home in 4 years.

Engine is running rough, rolling as if it is going to stop at all speeds. It was smooth before so I think I may have loosened some dirt while replacing the fuel tank and fuel lines and it is in the Marvel.

Right now I am just glad it is not pegging the temperature gauge anymore.

Dwight

I had overheating problems with my 27-25 since inheriting it from my father, took the original honeycomb core to an old time radiator guy, he removed the tanks, cleaned it all out, repaired some leaks, and made a whole new bottom outlet as the old one had corroded away, it now runs almost exact temps you describe above, cost over $600, but worth it to have peice of mind that the old honeycomb core is good for another 85 years

Picture033_zps11c1c716.jpg

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Alan,

That is great . I am glad it worked for you.

I agree. Original still is my first choice even when it comes to radiators. The reason I went in this direction was that estimates to do the work you described were well north of $1000. I think it would ultimately still be worth the cost, but I was not positive the radiator was the source of my overheating problem. I didn't want to take the chance of spending that much money on a radiator that wasn't really faulty and still overheat.

My plan was to not do anything that cannot be easily reversed. I kept the old radiator and did not alter the sheet metal that holds it inside the radiator shell ( I trimmed two small ears off a spare). If I choose at some point, I could have my radiator repaired. I could unbolt the Griffen and bolt in the old one in less than an hour.

It sounds like I am trying to defend my choice, but that is not my intent. I just wanted to give some insight into my thought process, no matter how quirky it my seem sometimes!

Dwight

Edited by Dwight Romberger (see edit history)
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my post may have come across the wrong way, I was just trying to show that the results are both similar, and unless you can find someone experienced with the old stuff, yours is a great option, the guy that repaired mine only leak tests vintage radiators to 4 psi, so it doesn't make more leaks, as they are not a pressurized system, most radiator places would just run 15psi in then an destroy the core

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Alan,

No, I didn't take it the wrong way. I understand what you were saying. I was concerned that my response sounded defensive, and then you would think I thought you wre criticising ny choice. I wanted to prevent that. I guess I didn't.

It is so hard to convene attitude with an email. I am always concerned that something I write will be taken the wrong way.

I really like your Buick touring car by the way!

Dwight

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  • 2 years later...

Thanks Guys

What happened is I took my radiator to the shop for a reverse flush while I was doing the motor up.

He soaked it with cleaner in for 4 days then flushed it out and 2 rather large leaks appeared which he sealed up and pressure tested and ok. Now after putting back on the car ,a small leak from a repair . Can I put a radiator sealer through to plug the small leak or is that a no no. Hence I would rather swap radiators to be sure as I think it is the original radiator. Apart from the leak it runs sweet and cool.

Cheers

Steve

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Steve, I have stopped minor radiator leaks with JB Weld epoxy. Make sure the area is clean and shiney. Just put a skim coat on the leak and let it cure for 24 hours or so. Paint it black and you will hardly notice it.

 

I have done the same thing except I sand blasted the area for good adhesion.  Painted it and it is almost impossible to find. 

 

That said, I still plan on getting the radiator re-cored as I believe the first couple of fixes is just the beginning of the domino effect.  Just got to get enough money together to get the re-core.

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