Jump to content

Woodgraining


DavidMc

Recommended Posts

I recently became aware of a new approach to woodgraining that thought I should share.

I was talking to friends who run a father and son signwriting business about the best way to reproduce a woodgrain effect on car interiors. They suggested the use of an adhesive backed on woodgrain patterned film. This can be purchased from signwriters supply outlets with a very realistic woodgrain pattern. It is made for exterior exposure with a 5 year life so it should last indefinitely on the dash of a car that is indoors most of the time.

The only problem I found was that the choice of woodgrain was limited to 2 patterns, I chose a walnut burl and the result was very pleasing.

My friends have now installed equipment that scan a sample from a photo, or part of the original and reproduce it on film large enough to cover the dash in one piece. They can experiment with the color tone to get any desired effect and the result is very good.

All of my experience has been with flat dashes however the process can be used on curves as well it just takes more skill to apply.

Well worth considering.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you post any photos? I'm trying to picture in my mind what it would look like, and in my mind, it doesn't look too good. Maybe some photos would help. Also, I would have to be concerned with the built up heat that would exist if the car were to be parked in the direct sun on an occasion. No, I wouldn't be in the habit of doing that, but I also wouldn't want to be limited to where I could park my car, fo fear of the adhesive sliding or pulling loose. In my mind, I can imagine the wood graining being like the sheets of Vinyl I have seen in the past. Just the feel alone would turn me off, and then again, could a clear coating be applied to it for the needed shine?

Link to post
Share on other sites
....My friends have now installed equipment that scan a sample from a photo, or part of the original and reproduce it on film large enough to cover the dash in one piece.....
How are they printing this onto the vinyl ?

Durability to direct sun & temperature is a question

_______________

3M have a range. Google "3M woodgrain" shows many

3M Di NOC Bubinga Gloss Wood Grain Wrap Vinyl 12"X48" | eBay

3M Di-Noc Wood Grain Series

3M Wood Grain Vinyl | eBay

http://www.topvinylfilms.com/catalog/Wood_Grain_Wrap_Vinyl-88-1.html

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=3m+woodgrain&client=firefox-a&hs=lym&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=Z27aUcThNIvVkwWOv4GgAQ&ved=0CEgQsAQ&biw=1344&bih=683

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bofusmosby, You are thinking of the cheap contact sheets of years ago that looked awful after a short while. This product is used by the signwriting industry on external signs exposed to all weather extremes including the sides of trucks. After the film is produced on what looks like a huge copying machine it then goes through a another machine that laminates a clear film. I understand that all signs are now made this way, sign writers no longer use paint and brushes.

This is a very robust product.

I just tried to photograph the roll of film but it has too much reflection.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

You will need to talk to signwriters in your area, your Hudson will have curved woodgrained surfaces which will make application of the adhesive film more difficult but it can be done and will probably have to be applied by someone with experience.

My signwriter friends who alerted me to the process recently showed me photos from a large trade show for new trucks where some of the display trucks had "chrome plated" bodies. The chrome was actually the same type of adhesive film which would have been removed at the end of the show so the trucks could be sold.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently had my 35 Pontiac done using water transfer printing. All 8 widow breaks, instrument panel and glove box door. Cost was $325 for all10 pieces.. The transfer looks really good, depreciated so it looks like the real thing. It's used on rifles, four wheelers and the like, so wear and durability should not be a problem. FIndings a pattern to match the origins rough cut oriental walnut, so I chose a dark walnut over a light base that even if it's not original looks great on a driver. You can probably find a local shop in the Yellow Pages or visit a gun shop and ask who camouflages guns for them. Joe

Link to post
Share on other sites

I went through all of this myself, back in the late 1970's. Did some tests. The adhesive-backed vinyl woodgrains (used on the sides of station wagons) had two disadvantages: first, they were so thick that they couldn't conform to the compound curvatures on my dash. Second, they all seemed to have a grain pattern embossed in the surface which just doesn't look right (period-correct woodgrained dashboards had no embossed grain; they were smooth and tended to have a glossy finish). I tried clear-coating them to fill the embossing and give a gloss look, but it really didn't work.

At the time, water-based graining film was not available or I'd have tried it. I assume that is thinner and takes a compound curve better than the adhesive backed vinyl. This could be the answer. Maybe the fabled "Di-Noc" water- or solvent-applied film is back!

I ended up woodgraining the dash myself, and was pretty happy with the results (you may be surprised to see how well you can do this, with a bit of practice).

Of course, another method is the direct-printing with ink and a large spongy roller with the woodgrain pattern on it. This might work for following curved contours.

Incidentally, I once saw some photos of how woodgrained dashboards were made and was astounded. (This was for the late-forties Hudsons which were mostly flat but did have a few compound curves.) The dashboards started as flat sheets of metal. Then the woodgrain was either direct printed on, or a woodgrain film was adhered. Then the panel was actually pressed into shape in a die! For some reason the woodgraining was not scratched or ripped by the tremendous forces exerted on it. I had always thought that the graining was on a film that was added to the already-shaped metal dash.

Link to post
Share on other sites
post-88682-143142242988_thumb.jpgThis is a pic of my Packard '39 street rod. I wanted to have the original dash look. The dash is walnut burl and the window trim is straight grain. The colors are also correct for that year. The dash needs to be able to be removed to get at all the tight places. The company I purchased the process from is called "Woodgrain Technologies" out of Florida.

post-88682-143142242962_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
[ATTACH=CONFIG]219373[/ATTACH]This is a pic of my Packard '39 street rod. I wanted to have the original dash look. The dash is walnut burl and the window trim is straight grain. The colors are also correct for that year. The dash needs to be able to be removed to get at all the tight places. The company I purchased the process from is called "Woodgrain Technologies" out of Florida.

Absolutely GORGEOUS work!

Link to post
Share on other sites

David,

A few pictures of mine that was done by hand by a lady that works for the place that did the metal work on my car.

She did an outstanding job.

post-31137-143142244044_thumb.jpg

It is now reinstall in car which I sill need to get some photos of it with all the chrome trim back on it.

post-31137-143142244037_thumb.jpg

post-31137-143142244043_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...