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Where did you mount your electric fuel pump?


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I'm adding an inline auxiliary electric fuel pump to help with vapor lock issues and was wondering where others that have done the same thing mounted theirs. Oh yes, the car is a 1936 Special.

From what I've read you want to put the pump as close to the tank as possible and also be sure to put it someplace where it is least likely to be hit but something.

I am currently eyeing up a flat place under the front passenger side of the trunk. This area is almost directly above the fuel outlet from the tank and it seems to be a very safe place to avoid accidental damage. The one concern I have is that it is quite high and I have concerns about how that might impact performance.

Another place I was looking at is on the inside of the frame at the rear wheel well. This would keep the height about where the fuel line currently is but it seems that it is more exposed to debris getting kicked up as well as getting closer to the axle should something really bad happen.

A final place I've been thinking about is to mount it in the frame just inward of the rear tire. It seems that mounting it there I could avoid accidental damage and also make it a bit more hidden. It would however mean running wires further and it would be a lot further from the fuel tank.

Any opinions or insight from your experiences would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Jeff

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I have priming pumps on both the '38 Roadmaster and Special. Here is where it is on the Special (work in progress)

post-38164-143141974066_thumb.jpgIf anything hits it there, I'm in trouble.

I use it only for priming the carb. I never have had a vapor locking problem on the Roadmaster

Don

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I vote for the "flat place under the front passenger side of the trunk". That location will keep it safe & easy to service. The initial priming will happen when the mechanical fuel pump pulls fuel through it. So don't worry about elevation as it will stay wet until you run out of fuel. It is a good idea to install an inline filter ahead of the new pump, but you will need to clean or replace the filter from time to time...

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Just to confirm what's already said. Close to the tank away from the exhaust. Definate plus to have inline filter on the tank side of the pump.

Speaking from experience, this modification will be one of the best you could do, takes away all stress from vapour lock. Good for priming carb after long periods of inactivity also.

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Thanks for all the feedback. When I looked through the sender mounting hole in my tank I was surprised that there wasn't anything at all on the pickup so a filter before the pump is definitely in the works. Don, thanks for the picture. I continue to lean toward the bottom of the trunk as a mounting place but I'm still researching.

Jeff

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I decided to reuse the post from the tank strap to mount the fuel pump strap so the pump is now tucked up above the tank in a nicely protected area.

post-51733-143141994935_thumb.jpg

I had some significant issues trying to bend fuel line and finally ended up using a couple of 90 degree fittings to simplify getting an inline fuel filter in front of the pump. That also solved a length issue I was having.

The fuel line running to the front of the car was unmodified and is still in its mounting clips. I ran the rubber on the outlet side to overlap by almost 3" mostly because I'm a bit paranoid about how well the hose will seal on the old line. BTW: the old line looks rusty but its all surface rust; I was prepared to replace it but it was so solid I decided to leave that for a winter project.

Jeff

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Jeff.I mounted mine on my 1940 century under the passenger rear door.Out of sight and out of peering eyes works great there 5yr no problem no vapor lock.

Frank

Have a great BUICK day

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On my '24 tourer I mounted it on the inside of the frame above the right rear wheel. It's a 12 volt centrifical pump I'm using in a 6 volt system and it works great. But still there was a problem of over pressurization of the Marvel carb. A pressure reducer solved that.

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On my '34 it is mounted inboard of the left frame rail, and forward of the rear axle. An in-line filter is used just prior to the pump.

I've always been advised that electric fuel pumps are a "Pusher", not a "Sucker", and that they should be mounted as low, and as close to the tank as practical.

The addition of the pump should be on a fused line, and with a cut-off switch. I use mine to prime the system, which is handy with the updraft carburetor.

AACA accepts the addition of electric fuel pumps on Pre-War vehicles, providing that the installation is done in a workman-like manner - and of course the pump should be in a relatively inconspicuous location.

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