BearsFan315

1929 Chevrolet International - 4 Door Sedan Project

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Things to check:

 

1-Check again for Coolant in oil

...(was no evidence before this road trip, will have to recheck now to see if any is in the oil

2-Pull Plugs and check coloration and condition, check gap as well

3-Pull distributor cap and check points, gap, etc...

3-Check timing and see where it is with spark cable all the way in.

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checked timing, and set per VCCA to 18 deg BTDC

the 12 deg mark is just starting to disappear out the top of the window.

however the timing light says it is only about 15 degrees ?!?

 

going to double check, tried to shoot a video BUT the strobe does not show up in video :(

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did a compression check, cyl 1 through 6, all plugs removed, spun engine over with starter, till Pressure maxed out on each cylinder, about 3-5 revolutions.

all were around 60-65 PSI

did NOT do a leak down, guess i could see how long it could hold the pressure, or set a duration and check at 1 min, 3 min, 5 min, etc... 

 

752777598_Cyl1Compression2019-09-29.thumb.jpg.993577486fb246015c1e1acb3d8fb0cf.jpg

Cylinder 01

 

1974285650_Cyl2Compression2019-09-29.thumb.jpg.4be540f5047e3829d9756d3208dc2d12.jpg

Cylinder 02

 

1402516929_Cyl3Compression2019-09-29.thumb.jpg.6354fe40e89b3f509d7aa156e5294beb.jpg

Cylinder 03

 

418541479_Cyl4Compression2019-09-29.thumb.jpg.8f9f923870bea1e565767bc772b0a066.jpg

Cylinder 04

 

1454642293_Cyl5Compression2019-09-29.thumb.jpg.46c08cafb8d215d51518df202f1ff6c8.jpg

Cylinder 05

 

1325960098_Cyl6Compression2019-09-29.thumb.jpg.c0bec80ed2a8be3fe696af096cc2c204.jpg

Cylinder 06

Edited by BearsFan315 (see edit history)

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after all this, put it all back together, double checked it once over and then fired it up.

 

shot a video of car idling and air in the Gano while idling and revving

 

 

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todays venture was machine shop calls... trying to get all my ducks in a row so when i pull the head i can go get it magnafluxed. figured IF i am pulling it, I am going to get it checked. found a few local shops that do that thing, and can machine it if needed, 1 of them can do the cast iron welding, the other 2 have a shop outside that does that for them. magnaflux cost run from $25 to $65 and can be done in a day or two. some also offered to do a pressure/vacuum test to test for porosity and pin holes.that is additional cost, approx $50.

 

now jsut have to remove everything so i can remove the head... love back pedaling !! oh the joys.

 

and just to think the PO told me the engine was completely rebuild... NOt today sir, not today. considering that they had a complete valve job done, would figured to get a magnaflux to be safe. who knows maybe it is something else. but all signs are pointing towards a cracked head.

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Things like this suck. My buddy Joe called me today to tell me he started putting on his rear fenders and noticed something not right with the color compared with the color of the car body. He paints his own car and has a big garage so he paints in one area and leaves the parts in the area. Turns out the paint shop mixed the two batches of paint differently and he didn’t notice because of his body being in another room plus the fluorescent lighting. He had put his front fenders on along with both aprons and never noticed the color differences. Now he has to pull parts off the car and repaint all four fenders, the splash aprons, radiator apron, fuel tank apron, and the luggage rack. He was really upset and depressed when he called and I can’t blame him for being so. It just plain sucks.

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1 hour ago, BearsFan315 said:

and just to think the PO told me the engine was completely rebuild... NOt today sir, not today.

 

Sorry for you misfortune, sounds like you're getting it all straightened out though, good job!

 

I spent the first 20 years of the car hobby trusting sellers, I'm a slow learner what can I say... and its cost me some cash I wish I had back along with my sense of trust.

 

Keep up the good work!

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well took a few hours and took head off engine... removed piece by piece with engine in car to remove the head.

 

20191005_193637.thumb.jpg.ac0a48d2323fcd8a7b1cb0a5cbcdea29.jpg

 

20191005_193802.thumb.jpg.eb80d072c12cd405537336e795fd2758.jpg

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then looking closely, and cleaning up the piston caps, they are stamped "STD", which tells me standard size, and the cylinder walls look like they were NOT honed or anything...

 

20191005_195724.thumb.jpg.1c1fae5a0fbf67a4dfa89a0b3cccb399.jpg

Piston

 

20191005_194041.thumb.jpg.9b3f5768d5a9fbb0e2c7b3173afda320.jpg

Cylinder Wall

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My first old car was a 1936 Chev. Were they the last incarnation of that engine? Anyway, the joke at that time was that Chev heads came from the factory with cracks. Look carefully at all the valve seats.

 

Any ridge at the top of the cylinders?

 

Boy this must be annoying to you. To get so far then find this. I hope it is not too bad and you don't have a full rebuild on your hands.

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1 hour ago, Spinneyhill said:

My first old car was a 1936 Chev. Were they the last incarnation of that engine?

 

Depending on how you look at it, yes. Chevrolet's improvements were incremental, making it sort of tough to separate them solidly into engine families. Popular lore would have you believe that the 1953 low-pressure engine was the last of the line. In reality, when you look closer, the 1936 207 had three main bearings (effectively 2 banks of 3 cylinders), and the 1937 216 has four main bearings (3 banks of two cylinders). No matter how you spin it, that is a major redesign.

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well taking a few days away as i am planning on going up to Hershey for a few days. walk around the fields, talk to some friends, maybe make a new one or two.

 

initiate talks with local shop here to clean and then magnaflux head as it is off the car. that is where i am going to  start. then i will be pulling the engine, and having cleaned, magnafluxed then bored, honed, decked, crankshaft checked and balanced. put in new oversize pistons and rings. validate the valve job or redoing the valves altogether. developed a plan of action and goal is to get it all done by spring. that is if i can afford it. hoping the babbit is good, has only about 30  miles on it or about 2 hours of run time total.

 

they are going to clean out all water and oil passage ways. to ensure good flow is permitted with little resistance. 

 

Looks like EGGE is bout the only place to get oversize pistons, pins, and rings for this car. 

 

also talked with J&M Machine Company as well as Columbia Classic Cars in regards to rebuilding the engine as well. 

 

Open to other options as well, shops that is...

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On 10/7/2019 at 12:12 AM, Bloo said:

 

Depending on how you look at it, yes. Chevrolet's improvements were incremental, making it sort of tough to separate them solidly into engine families. Popular lore would have you believe that the 1953 low-pressure engine was the last of the line. In reality, when you look closer, the 1936 207 had three main bearings (effectively 2 banks of 3 cylinders), and the 1937 216 has four main bearings (3 banks of two cylinders). No matter how you spin it, that is a major redesign.

Yes, the 1937 engine was a couple of inches shorter too.

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Looking at your photos 1-2, 3-4, & 5-6, and it may be an optical allusion or ..., but 3-4 looks  a little suspect around the piston area - did you personally ever check to see if the head was actually torqued down properly ? 

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21 hours ago, John_Mereness said:

Looking at your photos 1-2, 3-4, & 5-6, and it may be an optical allusion or ..., but 3-4 looks  a little suspect around the piston area - did you personally ever check to see if the head was actually torqued down properly ? 

yes, i did a retorque before fire up and then again after a few heat cycles. we are figuring either a cracked head or warped. either way it will get cleaned,  magnafluxed, and pressure tested, then valve check If valves are good and acceptable for function: clean up and reinstall and seat if NOT; new period correct valves go in), then flatness and machined if needed.

then the block will get torn down, cleaned, magnafluxed and pressure tested.bored, honed, new pistons, crankshaft check and balanced, block decked to match head, and whatever else we need while in there. check and validate babbit and line bore, all that good stuff...

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A lot of things have been overheated over time and then people pour cold water into them - sounds like a good plan.  You may get by fine with lower end if you stumble into a "for sure" problem when working on the head.  What I have found over time is that machine work is generally ok enough, but someone was arrogant as to something they would not take for granted on another car - (ex. late 30's and 40's Cadillac flatheads were also used in tanks so people view them as bulletproof and most magniflux them - yet they tend to crack between the valves in two most rear cylinders) 

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Jerry, great seeing you at Hershey and thanks for the support on the Olds. I would also check the face of your manifold while you got it apart. I always face my manifolds when doing a head or engine over.

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4 hours ago, chistech said:

Jerry, great seeing you at Hershey and thanks for the support on the Olds. I would also check the face of your manifold while you got it apart. I always face my manifolds when doing a head or engine over.

Ted it was great seeing you at Hershey and was good to catch up. 

 

no problem, that Olds is immaculate !! Poor Joe worked hard to detail, and you got stuck talking to everyone. 

 

the guy at the shop inquired about that as well, machining the manifold face on the head as well as the manifolds to ensure everything is FLAT. goingto try and go by tomorrow and drop off the head for them to do their magic. well magnaflux...

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