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rowan782

1954 Mopar Automatic Transmissions

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I had a 1953 Chrysler, with what I called the "tip-toe" shift, I hated it. Did Chrysler still have that trans in 1954?

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By 1954 they had the Powerflite. This was a 2 speed torque converter transmissions similar in action to the Chev Powerglide, Buick Dynaflow, Packard Ultramatic, Fordomatic and similar transmissions. In 1957 they brought out the 3 speed Torqueflite.

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In 1954, you could still get a Dodge gyro-matic (the M6 so-called semi automatic transmission), same thing as the tip-toe shift. I think the last year for the M6 in the Desoto and Chrysler lines was 1953. You could also get the Plymouth Hy-Drive transmission in 1954. That was a 3-speed manual transmission with a clutch behind an engine oil fed torque converter.

A high school friend had a '54 Dodge with the gryo-matic. The car had been his father's. He told me his father liked the M-6 transmission, but he had to special order it from the dealer because there were none on lots in his area. Only 3 speed manuals and powerflites.

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When it came to performance (acceleration) the Fluid Torque Drive was faster than the new Powerflite. Not sure how it stacked up against the Torqueflite.

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Chrysler's Powerflite (late 1953) was similar to Chevrolet's 2nd generation Powerglide (1953) and Ford's 2nd Fordomatic (1959). All three were two speed units with a torque converter and started out in low gear when in Drive and shifted to direct.

Buick's Dynaflow (1948) was a 2-speed box but started in direct drive when in Drive while low gear was available only when you placed it in Low. The 1st Chevrolet Powerglide of 1950-52 was similar to Dynaflow. Packard's Ultramatic (1949) was also similar to Dynaflow but with a lockup torque converter, while Twin-Ultramatic (1955) had low gear start in Drive. The oriiginal Fordomatic (1951) was a 3 speed - 1st gear was Low while Drive started in 2nd and shifted to 3rd. Studebaker's Automatic Drive (1950) was similar to Fordomatic but with a lockup torque converter and a hill-holder.

The first automobile automatic, Hydramatic, used a 4-speed gearbox connected to a fluid coupling and was introduced to the public for the 1940 model year - the year before Chrysler's Fluid Drive was mated to a 4-speed semi-automatic.

Chrysler's Torqueflite came out late in the 1956 model year and used a 3-speed planetary gear set with a torque converter. Both GM (Turbo Hydramatic) and Ford (1960's Cruiseomatic) would copy Torqueflite. Chrysler was the last manufacturer to get an automatic but they came up with the best.

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The three speed automatics must have been a running change in 56. I see 56 Imperials like mine with either two or three speeds. Mine is a three speed and still works after all these years. The engine nor transmission has ever been apart and still starts when ever I need it to.

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1953 imperial had the powerflite in the later runs of the car, but all other Chryslers did not have it until 1954. I have a 54 Windsor and it is a good trans. I just do not have kickdown. It leaks in the rear and makes my parking brake useless. drives and shifts like it should. they were used in police cars for a long time. very bulletproof units and easily rebuildable. capt den

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