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Franklin31

Sidedraft: initial valve settings (COLD) ????????????

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Cannot find anywhere the valve clearance initial settings when cold. What is a good setting so I can start engine, warm it up, then set valve clearances 'hot'. Assume it starts !! Then I suppose it is .008 & .010.

Tks

Richard

Still wish I could use 'enter' in this forum to make paragraphs--works in 'edit'. Secret?

Edited by Franklin31
to make a paragraph !!! (see edit history)

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According to my Series 14 Instruction Book, "The valve clearance is best adjusted while the engine is cold." "Loosen the adjusting nuts and adjust the screws.....until a .007" feeler gauge is just free between the valve stem and walking beam." Do you not have the book?

Gordon Howard

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Thanks; rec'd info: .006 & .008 hot; will set at .010 then crank, warm-up and then re-set while running.

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0.007 and 0.007 COLD is specififed for the 1930 cam. In 1931, the cam was redesigned with longer quieting ramps to lessen rocker noise. Clearances for the 1931 and later engines is Intake - 0.003" and Exhaust 0.006", both set HOT and RUNNING.

Note that HOT means HOT, not WARM. You cannot get the engine HOT without getting all up to full operating temp. It's best to adjust valves after a good run of 10 miles or more.

Although - the side draft holds clearances quite well, which is one reason 0.007 and 0.007 COLD was o.k. on the 1930. But at the tighter clearance spec of the 1931 and later cam, it's pretty important to set HOT. I like to set mine after I return home from a good run - then I set them at 003 and 006. But when I am on a long trip, it's not always convenient to check the valves at the end of a full, long day's run. It's also difficult to start out the next morning and then stop to set the valves at some point during the day. So I do sometimes run the engine at a very fast idle for 5 to 10 minutes or so while checking out the car before the day's run (with the spark pulled out, tyring to get the engine hotter, faster). Knowing the engine cannot be up to full, even temp, I'll set the valves at 005 and 007. Nothing wrong with wider clearances, but I like to avoid anything over 007 as the rocker tips tend to pound and things then wear faster. There's no good reason that I know of to run extra wide clearances. With good fits on rcoker pins, pushrods etc, the 1931 and later valves can be very quiet at 0.003 and 0.006 as the factory specified.

Of course, it's up to the operator to be certain that clearances remain o.k. I check mine every other day when on a long trip, but of course oil every morning.

I like to wear gloves to keep the heat of the exhaust manifold from burning my hands/wrists. Another tip - adjust with the spark out to get the engine to idle as slowly as possible to make the whole process easier. It's a bit of a clumsy operation, but once you've done it regularly, can be done in less then 10 minutes on the sidedraft.

tom

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Check the ID plate on the fire wall. My 30 give the valve clearance on that plate.

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I am a little confused here. I remember the 1930 listing valve clearances as .003 and .006 hot. However, all my literature including my original 1932 Series 16 owners manual list .007 and .007 Hot.

Is there a service bulliten or something that over rides these specifications? I would like to set my valves at .003 and .006 to quiet them down but do not want to burn out valves setting them this close if it will cause a problem.???

Bob

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I am a little confused here. I remember the 1930 listing valve clearances as .003 and .006 hot. However, all my literature including my original 1932 Series 16 owners manual list .007 and .007 Hot.

Is there a service bulliten or something that over rides these specifications? I would like to set my valves at .003 and .006 to quiet them down but do not want to burn out valves setting them this close if it will cause a problem.???

Bob

Huh - Yeah, I'd forgotten about that. The 1931 spec is 003 and 006 and then you're right, back to 007 and 007 for 1932. I thought the cams were the same from 1931 to the end, but need to check that. We grind all to the 1932 drawing, yet I set my 1931 at 003 and 006 and sure like it. I'll do some research.

Another modification to one of my previous posts - since you caused me to actually READ the manual again more carefully for each year (and not rely on my degrading memory), according to the book - running the engine at an rpm equivelant to 30 mph for 10 minutes is sufficient to warm it up for valve setting. It's the 1908 to Series 3 in early 1913 that really need the engine HOT for valve settings.

Another recurring pitch for all to have an operating manual for your car and follow the instructions!

tom

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My recollection of my lost Series 14 Instruction Book is COLD .007" and "007", which a Service Bulletin allowed to be reduced to .005" in case

quiet was a customer priority.

For Series 15, the Instruction Book said .003" and .006" Hot- HOt meaning aaron for 10 MInutes at 30 mph. A Service Bulletin at the end of '31

still said .003 and .006 Hot. But how does that square with an original Series 15 Serial Number Plate that says .007" and 007"?

Further yet another variable is the installation of non-Franklin valve-actuating mechanism, like Al Warren and Bob harrison have. How would

such an installation affect what the Factory instructed us to do?

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SIDEDRAFT CAM INFO - To set the record straight(er?) -

Summary:

1930 - ALL 0.007" intake and 0.007" exhaust COLD

1931 - ALL 0.003" intake and 0.006" exhaust HOT

1932 - 34 6-cylinder 0.007" intake and 0.007" exhaust HOT

The 1930 cam was a one-year design (dwg#44504). Valve setting was given as 0.007 and 0.007 COLD. I like to set 1930's HOT, like the later specs.

The 1931 cam was changed significantly from 1930 in numerous ways (dwg#51393). Valve setting was given as 0.003" Intake, 0.006" Exhaust HOT. (My firewall tag on my 153 also specifies 003 and 006). Carl Doman designed Quieting Ramps to the camshaft lobes, allowing for slow and gradual take-up of rocker clearance and the tight clearance greatly minimized rocker noise.

For 1932 (Series 16, dwg#55669), the intake lobe profile was changed again and the specified clearance was changed from 0.003" to 0.007". The quieting ramp was shortened and steepened somewhat to allow for greater clearance but still use the same opening and closing specifications. It is a guess that the 0.003" clearance might have been found to be dangerously tight, resulting in problems if a strict maintenance schedule was not adhered to. But the 1932 & later cam is still radically different from the 1930 cam and valvestrains in good condition can be extremely quiet.

The 1932 (dwg#55669) cam is specified for all Series 16, 18 and 19 models and as a replacement cam for all 1931 (meaning the 1931 cam would not be serviced by the factory). To my knowledge, the factory did not issue any corrective instructions regarding valve settings on 1931 engines with a replacement cam.

We have always ground the 1931 cams to 1932 specs - because we have always have very good 1932 masters to grind from. Setting a 1932 grind at 0.003 and 0.006 changes the duration of the intake valve (and exhaust slightly) to no ill effect, as evidenced by my own car (and may improve higher speed performance, but maybe not...!)

Setting a 1931 cam at 0.007 and 0.007 would likely make for a noisier intake rocker. The shorter duration would likely not really be felt.

It's best to run the right cam in the right engine and set it by the factory spec!

Note that the 1930 cam is NOT interchangeable with the later engines. Doing so would make it very difficult for future repairman to set up the cam timing as they are very different between 1930 and 1931 and one would not know which setting instructions to use. Due, in part, to the quieting ramps, the 1931 & later cams are not set by common, rule-of-thumb means, unlike all earlier Franklin cams. The engines also feel quite different. I believe it a mistake to interchange them. (Some have said a 1929 cam installed in a 1930 gave more power - I have not investigated and have no comment now)

There is no difference to any specifications to an engine that is running tubular, or semi-tubular pushrods.

Have I made it more complicated?

tom

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Made it more complicated? Not at all. An excellent explaination all in one place, just what we need in many situations.

Gordon

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This paragraph from Service Bulletin 609, 7/9/31 may help:

TRANSCONTINENT CAR NUMBER PLATES

On some of the first Series 15 Transcontinent cars a number plate similar to the Series 14 plate was used.

This number plate gives the valve clearance for Series 14 cars and does not apply to the Series 15 Transcontinent engines, which should have clearances of .006" for the exhaust valves and .003" for the intake valves.

We shall replace the incorrect car number plates by either of teh two following methods: Send the old plate to us with a letter for reference or send us an affidavit properly signed and a new number plate will be sent with the understanding that the old plate will be return to the Factory.

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