Jump to content

Title prior to restoration....


keiser31

Recommended Posts

I just saw a thread elsewhere on a guy who is going all out on a ride for himself. He has been working on it and putting a lot into it......money, parts, labor, etc. Well, about 1/2 way through the thread there was mention by him that he did not have a title for the vehicle, yet. Didn't even know where the serial number was located. I mentioned to him that he really needs to get a legal title prior to redoing the vehicle. I have seen where this has happened and the original or legal owner finds the car after it was redone by someone and had reclaimed it. I was wondering if there were any similar events that may have happened to any of you or had seen/heard of this happening, also.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Absolutely get a title before you start restoration. There have been many stories, true or not, about autos that were seized during restoration or after they were completed. Back in the early 70's we had to purchase a 3 year bond that protected you from former owners that might come forward and claim your car. During that bond period you were asked not to restore your vehicle, although many disregarded the advise. All states are different, but keep every bit of info and all receipts from day one. I always get a clear title and license plate whether it is road worthy or not. It just helps during a resale. Just my opinion. Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We started putting plates on our cars as well. Last year we took delivery of a '66 Mustang convertible. The car was in rough shape, but the first thing we did was register it. By having the car registration, it makes it easier to register the car and then you have a valid registration for the car. In the case of the great state of New York, we have a receipt for $4,000 (which we paid for the car). If we waited until the restoration was complete before we put the plates on it, DMV would most likely accuse us of submitting a false receipt. It's better to pay sales tax on what you paid for the car rather than have DMV send out an appraiser and force you pay what they think the car is worth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

New York doesn't look twice at your old car unless you admit you pieced it together from several cars, not sure why they'd worry about the reciept as long as you pay them something. I mean, I once gave them a reciept saying I paid two cents for a car and they didn't question it. (actually it was a freebie, but that was another story).

The key is if the car comes with paperwork, make sure the numbers match, and if they tax you then you should register it right away when the value is low. If the car has no paperwork, then you should do whatever you need to get paperwork before you do anything else. New York is pretty easy, other states vary from relatively easy, to difficult, to impossible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

New York doesn't look twice at your old car unless you admit you pieced it together from several cars, not sure why they'd worry about the reciept as long as you pay them something. I mean, I once gave them a reciept saying I paid two cents for a car and they didn't question it. (actually it was a freebie, but that was another story).

The key is if the car comes with paperwork, make sure the numbers match, and if they tax you then you should register it right away when the value is low. If the car has no paperwork, then you should do whatever you need to get paperwork before you do anything else. New York is pretty easy, other states vary from relatively easy, to difficult, to impossible.

I don't know which county DMV you're dealing with, but in my county that won't fly. We had a hard time saying that we bought a '66 Mustang convertible for $4,000 and there's no way that you'd ever get away with it in my county if the car was restored. Had we not shown a date stamped picture of the car and the VIN, it wouldn't have flown. In 2001 DMV gave us a hard time registering our '37 Plymouth pickup because we didn't have a receipt of purchase. Even though my father had the truck registered in 1971, and had the registration to prove it, they still gave him a hard time because he didn't have a receipt from when the truck was bought in 1965. DMV's answer to him was "how do we know that you didn't sell the vehicle and buy it back?" In the case of registering our '52 Willys, because it was a military vehicle there was no registration so they sent the Sheriff's Department out to the house to do a VIN verification. What you may be able to get away with doesn't mean everyone, in every jurisdiction can get away with. I am giving you scenarios that we have personally encountered with our local DMV. When you have a better than 13 vehicles on the road, we've had more experience with this than most people will ever face. Another obstacle that we've been in that most people may not be aware of, is that in New York State the local DMV's cannot process historic plates with a vehicle weighing more than 18,000 pounds. You can get historic plates on a vehicle weighing more than 18,000 pounds, but the local DMV cannot do it.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...