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Victoria cars 1930's


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Mark, different companies used the name "Victoria" for different kinds of cars. Ford built a 2-door sedan they called a Victoria that was shorter than other 2-door sedans and it had no trunk. It had a strange little protrudance on the back end at the rear bumper and lots of people commonly called them "Ducktail Coupes." Others, including Packard, called their convertibles "Victorias." They had no side windows for the rear seat, a small back window, and an external trunk. The 1934 Packard Victoria is an exceptionally beautiful example of this.

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Guest Nancy DeWitt

We have two Victorias that bear no resemblance to each other. A 1921 Heine-Velow Victoria touring:

post-58418-143141927841_thumb.jpg

and a 1933 Hupmobile Series K-321 Victoria:

post-58418-143141927855_thumb.jpg

The Hupp has a built-in trunk.

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Guest stude8

post-31139-143141928194_thumb.jpg

This is a 1930 Studebaker President 8 State Victoria for four model FH (125" wheel base), it has a small tool compartment at the rear of the body and a fold down trunk rack with a metal trunk installed on it. It is powered by the President type FE 331 CID inline eight engine.

The Victoria body was also available on the FE chassis with 135" wheel base.

Stude8

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To further roil the waters, a Victoria was, originally, a horse drawn carriage. It was not closed and it did not have a little hump on the back. I think automakers latched onto the name because it sounded elegant. The Heine Velox comes closest

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Guest prs519
We have two Victorias that bear no resemblance to each other. A 1921 Heine-Velow Victoria touring:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]196107[/ATTACH]

and a 1933 Hupmobile Series K-321 Victoria:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]196108[/ATTACH]

The Hupp has a built-in trunk.

I still think your Hupp is one of the most beautiful cars EVER made, if not the most beautiful.

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Guest Nancy DeWitt

One of my favorites is the 1908 Columbia Electric Mark LXX Victoria Phaeton that was in the John O'Quinn collection:

post-58418-143141929682_thumb.jpg

You can definitely see the influence of a horse-drawn carriage in its design. This image is from a ClassicCarWeekly website.

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The "Free Dictionary" defines a victoria (note small "v") as, " 1. a light four-wheeled horse-drawn carriage with a folding hood, two passenger seats, and a seat in front for the driver." Phaeton, hack and roadster and other similar words, no doubt, were being used to describe horses and carriages before the first auto moved under it's own power.

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