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Looking at a 1949 Super Convertible


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I'm currently looking to purchase a 1949 Super Convertible which has had an older restoration but appears to be in good condition. I'd say between a number 3 and 2 condition. The car does have Dynaflow and I prefer it did not. According to the seller, he has not done any overhaul of the transmission because he has not had a problem with it and did not feel an overhaul was warranted. The car has 72000 miles. I have read in forums where Dynaflows do not, to say the least, have a good reputation. What are you guy's opinion on this, and what can I expect, and also what is the going rate to have a Dynaflow overhauled now a days?

Also, the gas gauge does not work. This is a problem I had with my '39, but I was able to fix by repairing a bad ground. The seller did replace the sending unit a few years ago and it did work for some years. But, I'd assume that the sending unit is the culprit, if not a ground problem, or possibly the gauge itself is defective. Any thoughts on this, and how hard is it to get to the gauge, I already know that I'll have to drop the tank if it requires a new sending unit.

Other than these two items, I don't see any other problems with the car, although obviously 64 year old cars can have their issues - just like people!

thanks,

Jim

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BERNIE, no, you couldn't handle the stress of a perfectly functional but unknown Dynaflow AND a bad gas gauge. Clearly, Jim needs to PM me the seller's contact information.

JIM, seriously, buy the car. Dynaflows are not mysterious black boxes. They are remarkably durable devices that can be repaired as needed by any transmission shop. Parts are readily available and not expensive. The one in my '57 was leaking terribly and had a gerry-rigged repair 40 years ago. A local shop made it good as new for $1200. As for the faulty gauge, you'd have a hard time spending $200 getting that fixed and you're probably already halfway there with your previous experience.

Now, go get it and post lots of pictures for Bernie and me, so we can call it "the one that got away".

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Jim, I'm not sure if the convertible was even offered in a stick. Anyone know? The Roadmaster Convertible had the Dynaflow as standard. I love mine! Most people want an automatic to drive, and if you ever wanted to sell it and get something else, the automatic would be more appealing to most folks I would think as anyone could drive it.

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Without knowing the price, you definitely entertained us with the Dynaflow concern! The engine will likely need an overhaul before the dynaflow and its about as simple as you can get in an automatic (if you want to call it that) tranny. Most guys buying a convertible either have very deep pockets or the car is a rusted out pile of junk. Personally, I would be looking at rust. If it is indeed a rust free convertible and all there, the only issue is price. However, you can't restore a rusty convertible for any sane amount of money. Don't hesitate to pay full book value on a rust free convertible- there are not many.

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Okay, thanks for the info, fins, and I'm glad I could provide some entertainment. I had read in other forums where some guys were not to thrilled with Dynaflows, but maybe they were folks that just got stuck with a lemon or tired transmissions. Wikipedia, (for what they know), says that Dynaflow was an option on 1949 Buick Supers as an all encompassing statement. I guess that means convertibles too.

While we are on the subject, where is the serial number located on this car-firewall? frame? door post? I'm assuming it was used to register the title. I don't think VIN numbers appeared until the 60's.

Its kind of important information for me to know. Thanks

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Not sure on a 49, but 55's had them on the drivers side door jamb. If not there, I'd check the upper firewall. I know I've seen them on 40 era cars, just can't remember where.

Also, don't believe the hype re: Dynaflows. I have one rebuilt trans that doesn't leak at all, one original untouched that is still in service after 125,000 miles that leaks a tiny bit, and one that leaks a lot, but that one I know needs the pan gasket replaced.

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Without knowing the price, you definitely entertained us with the Dynaflow concern! The engine will likely need an overhaul before the dynaflow and its about as simple as you can get in an automatic (if you want to call it that) tranny. Most guys buying a convertible either have very deep pockets or the car is a rusted out pile of junk. Personally, I would be looking at rust. If it is indeed a rust free convertible and all there, the only issue is price. However, you can't restore a rusty convertible for any sane amount of money. Don't hesitate to pay full book value on a rust free convertible- there are not many.

Funny how all of us "convertible" guys chimed in on this post.

Looking forward to seeing pictures and a "happy" face. Matt

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