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Woo Hoo! I am now a Dodge Bros 1928 Victory 6 coupe owner!


BretK
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I am starting my first foray into care restoration with this car, so go easy on me if I ask a bunch of stupid questions:confused: I have previously restored and built only steam powered vehicles (boat, road locomotive, traction engine and 4 wheeled steam cycle) so this is my first entry into internal combustion territory. My first goal is to familiarize myself with the car, then get it into running order. I am thinking of leaving it in its work clothes and not doing much cosmetically, just get it into a daily driver condition. I am planning on ordering the Meyers Vic 6 manual, and getting the dodge bros club cd library. I have the original owners manual. Any other reference suggestions? Should I keep it 6 volt and vacuum fuel system?

Thanks in advance for your patience.

Bret

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Good on you Mate And welcome to the DB Forum I wish one could find an auto in as nice of a condition as yours. Down here in Aust they are well used and in many cases modified to suit a purpose of the day. e.g Cut down to make a ute (pickup in your lingo) In Answer to your questions the vacuum tank fuel system is very reliable and the 6 volt system is good as long as all the earth points are kept in good condition I am restoring a 2249 DB senior that was an absolute basket case and I sure envy one when I see an example like that turn up Good luck and there are many Victory 6 Experts on the forum to guide you with any hickups that you will have Ron

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WOW! That's a beaut! Good luck and stick with the original equipment. It did the job for many years and many miles. It seems that some, not all, new updates bring on more headaches than what they're worth. A good, clean fuel system, from the tank to the engine is mandatory and will discount many trouble-shooting hours in the future. Same with the basic engine electrical system. Hope to see more pictures of your work in near future. Best of luck Bret!---Pete.

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I would keep the car as original as possible. A good, careful cleaning will really improve her looks. I'd replace the wiring only if the original is frayed or crumbling and I'd replace it with the correct cloth covered wire. Your car has wooden floors, so attaching seatbelts may be a problem and they look awful. I'm all for safety, but if you don't plan on major milage I'd leave them off. Turn signals mean adding lights and hurting originality, but that's your call. That car is a real find - you're a lucky individual.

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Bret, welcome to the Victory Six group!! We are working on restoring our Deluxe Sedan. Get the Vic 6 CD from Meyers!! It is well worth the money!! We have it & swear by it!! It has helped us a great deal. Don't be afraid to ask us either. Looks like you have a great car!! There are some ways to add turn signals that have a look of being period correct. My husband & I are contemplating on doing that since we are going to be doing a whole new wiring harness for our car. Some of the guys here have discussed it before & have given great ideas on it. Good luck with it and again.....welcome to the forum!!

Shannon

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Also has anyone added lap seat belts or turn signals to their car?
Your decision to add signal lights may depend on where you live. I live in a congested area where signaling turns is really needed for safety. I tried using hand signals for several years, but most people these days don't recognize what you're doing. (Several people thought I was flipping them the bird when signalling right!) I also find the flashers handy for short highway stretches when I'm going 50mph while others are going 65+.

Here's my solution. I chose these lights (which are actually sold for Harleys) because they go well with a DL6's headlights and cowl lamps. Then I swapped out the 32W 12V bulbs with 15W 6V bulbs.

I already had two of the bumper brackets, and was able to find two more. Just the right size and styling.

The switch on the column is the higher-quality choice from Restoration Supply. I like it because of its "period" look. It's very solid. The 12V indicator bulb needed a 6V swap.

It took several days to do the wiring properly, including good grounding for each light's circuit, and finding good channels to hide the 16 gauge wires.

I'm very pleased with the results...and I sleep a lot better knowing I'm a safer driver!

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Phil, That's one of the nicest turn signal mod I've seen. Bret, go over to the "FORDBARN" Model A Ford website to see all the threads about lap belts and turn signal modifications. They are always doing things like that to the million Model A's out there. Most are quite good. Seat belts can be installed to the steel center crossmember, or even the seat frame, but I've not done any seat belt mods to any of my oldies on the road. I try to drive very defense-ably. You're surrounded by thick, U.S. steel, a downtown fender bender probably won't even scratch your Dodge. There has been some SERIOUS highway wrecks in the last few years involving antique cars. One of the most important safety mods you can consider is to replace the windshield plate glass for safety glass, and perhaps the door plate glass also. Taylormade & Keiser hit the nail on the head with the input about the wiring.--Best, Pete.

P.S.-- I spoke to a young man going for his license now in 2013 and he told me they still teach hand signaling in his classroom work. Do they pay attention? Hmmm...

Edited by Pete K. (see edit history)
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Wow, thanks for all the great advice. Phil - I really like the look of those signals, they blend real nice. Pete- I will check out the ford forum. Shannon- I have a call in to Meyers, and will probably be contacting you too. Taylormade - will do a good clean up and see what we get, I am a fan of original too. Keiser- thanks for the ri tip.

pbret

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I got my cd and parts manual ordered from Meyers. I have emailed the Dodge Bros Club for registration info (can't seem to do online with my iPad) and I get my car tomorrow! I will post pics of the event tomorrow! Any special info when hauling? I know the tires won't hold air for the ride home, but hopefully they hold long enough to winch it onto the trailer!

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Good start. I would drain the gas tank. Disconnect the vaccuum uptake from tank to fuel line. Lower the tank using the 2 straps holding the tank to the body. Slowly, slowly lower the gas tank. Use your lift and a 2 X 6 X 24? piece of wood to shield the tank. Obviously do all this outside with good ventilation and a good A:B:C fire extinguisher nearby. Seriously.

Once the gas tank is off and in fresh air for you; you will be surprised by the volume of crud in the tank. Wash the tank a couple of times to get rid of the big crud.

Then put a NAPA 3031 or 3021 cannot remmember which, fuel filter in line about where the fuel line goes over the rear axle. The NAPA is a clear plastic so you can see if your vac tank or pump is cycling fuel. Obviously you need to cut the original fuel line to install the modern filter. Probably less than 6 inches. The vac tank has an inlet filter but by the time it plugs you will be at the side of the road!

Best wishes

Paul

Edited by P Bohlig
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I got my cd and parts manual ordered from Meyers. I have emailed the Dodge Bros Club for registration info (can't seem to do online with my iPad) and I get my car tomorrow! I will post pics of the event tomorrow! Any special info when hauling? I know the tires won't hold air for the ride home, but hopefully they hold long enough to winch it onto the trailer!

Just be certain that the hood is latched, doors are completely closed and the car is tied down really well front and rear while hauling. I always put wood blocks in front of and behind the wheels on one side just for good measure. Be sure NOT to tie the front axle in the center.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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She is Home! I started with a thorough vacuuming and removal of the seat and carpets, they are in remarkable shape for their age, even the wood floor panels seem sound. does anyone have a tip for softening the front rubber mat? linseed oil?

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Hi Bret, I have to say again what a nice find you've got there. With just mostly some elbow grease, a "conserving" of all the original cosmetic aspects of interior and exterior of the Dodge, you'd have an award winning car for most original "unrestored". A very rare thing these days! You may want to consider the Goodyear all weather diamond tread tires. I have had a set on my '31 ford for a while and they are the best. I believe Coker also sells them. Check the back pages of any Hemmings Motor News for all the old car tire co. ads. The valve stems on the tubes come either as a center mount or offset, depending on the wheel. In most cases, wood spoke wheels take a center mount stem which pokes up straight between the spokes. Coker and others sell tubes with either rubber stems or the nicer, but pricier, nickel plated brass stems which would have been on your car when new. The metal stems are vulcanized onto the tubes, not just clamped in, which can lead to leaks if not done right. Tubes these days seem to leave a lot to be desired. They're now made mostly in Vietnam and other foreign countries, nothing close to the quality of old, USA rubber tubes. If your tubes are OK, not dry rotted or patched to death, SAVE 'EM. You probably know all this with all your experience with other "oldies". Not sure how to soften the rubber mat. I would like to know that too.

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Great pictures, was their any of the original tool-kit still down in the tool tray that you were able to find?

I have soaked rubber parts in a bucket filled with automatic transmission fluid and the rubber did soften and is still as pliable and is now more pliable than the day I put them in and that was several years ago.

The parts that I did this with showed no signs of deterioration after removing them from their soaking.

Since their soaking however they have not been continuously re-exposed to the sun but instead have been sitting for the most part in a box within a box and so I do not know how much of a difference the ultra-violet rays will affect them once exposed again.

I have had the same results with soaking the parts in a bucket of armor-all.

I am not sure when new how pliable the parts were so it is tough to judge how great of a difference the soaking made over original but the difference it made from when I placed them in the bucket was very significant.

They may have soaked for a month if not longer.

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
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Bret, that is one beautiful car! On the mat I would not use linseed oil as it will dry hard (personal experience).....I've looked at many posts for my own car and rubber restoration and most people swear by a product called Lestoil to rejuvenate rubber. I too, say to keep it in original condition as you don't find them like this often, but as you clean / work on your car take many photos for us poor souls that have started out w/ little or had parts modified in their many years. BTW, it looks like your upholstery may be the same blue-green mohair as my '29 DA.

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Hi Bret, great looking car!! Your green looks a lot like our green!! Your interior color even reminds me of our car!! The even cooler part....my vin is M57507...yours isn't far off from mine! How cool is that? I agree with a lot of these guys, a good cleaning, fix what you need to and call it good for now! What a great find!! Let me know if there is anything we can help with!

Shannon

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here are the contents of the trunk and tool kit. i will try the lestoil on the mat and rubber gaskets around the windows. any reccomendations on cleaning the seat fabric and carpet? dry cleaner? how about the paint restoration, maybe the clay cleaner from eastwood?

thanks for all the compliments, what a great first car to fall into!

bret

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Joined the dodge brothers club today, and got my tires and tubes ordered from Coker tire. Hopefully they won't be too hard to install, haven't changed a tire in a split rim before:eek: spent part of the day cleaning the inside and out. First with soap and water, then a little mommas old fashioned Murphy's oil soap. Got some of the at least 30 years of crud off, but still open to suggestions. So how much can I do and still be considered original? I would like to patch a couple mouse holes in the headliner, and maybe use some stop rust of some sort on the running boards. I did find some decent rust under the rubber side mats. As I am going to try and drive this regularly and it will occasionally get wet, how do I prevent further deterioration?

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Spray the bad metal with oshpo, neutralize and then hit it with either and oil based undercoat or an acid based primer before any sort of compatible paint or topcoat.

Patching and repairing can only help to prolong the originalality of the vehicle in my opinion so I say go for it

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That car is a seriously genuine find, Bret. With your experience of steam restorations I am sure the car could not be in better hands. I know this is a long shot but I would love to find a pre 1905 car to restore for our famous London to Brighton Veteran Car Run and a steamer would be my ideal car. If you hear of an unloved project (for not too much money) please let me know. PM me if you like.

Best wishes.

Ray.

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That car is a seriously genuine find, Bret. With your experience of steam restorations I am sure the car could not be in better hands. I know this is a long shot but I would love to find a pre 1905 car to restore for our famous London to Brighton Veteran Car Run and a steamer would be my ideal car. If you hear of an unloved project (for not too much money) please let me know. PM me if you like.

Best wishes.

Ray.

Ray,

I will ask a couple of guys at the Saca club and see if they have any leads, maybe an early Stanley or locomobile that needs some love. I watched some vids in years past on that run, sounds like a great time! Seems to me the salvage squad folks did a steam car resto for that run, maybe a white.

Bret

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Ray,

I will ask a couple of guys at the Saca club and see if they have any leads, maybe an early Stanley or locomobile that needs some love. I watched some vids in years past on that run, sounds like a great time! Seems to me the salvage squad folks did a steam car resto for that run, maybe a white.

Bret

Yes Bret, Salvage Squad did restore an early White (probably no relation!) for the Brighton Run and to my untutored (steamy) eye made a really nice job of it. I have been on the trail of a rare Grout for some time now. Apparently it is incomplete and dismantled and has been hiding out in a barn in New Hampshire for the past 80 years. I have the feeling it is another dead end search. So long as the car is pre 1905, I will consider almost anything but as you can imagine, some folk have an unrealistic ideas when it comes to pricing!

Back to your lovely car. I am sure I don't need to tell you that what you have there is precious because of it's originality; indeed, I can't think of a better custodian than someone who can recall a restoration by the 'Salvage Squad'. Did you know that Suggs is still lead singer with 'Madness' ? They performed an outdoor concert in London recently....brilliant!

Thanks for looking out for me,

Cheers,

Ray.

Edited by R.White
spalign (see edit history)
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Ok as I was doing some exploring I was trying to decide on the best way to degrease the suspension, drivetrain and engine compartment without damaging the paint or causing any water problems, so do i rent a steam cleaner, use the spray on stuff(and if so which)< or what? i really cant take it somewhere so i need to do this at home, i have a powerwasher but feel that might be too damaging and gett too much water where i dont want it.

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I know its not environmentally friendly and I do truly care about the environment and our animals that are trying to survive in it but hosing it down with kerosine and a high powered pressure washer is a good way to go. Not the only way but a good way if you can somehow contain the wash-off.

I wouldnt worry about getting anything wet, it will dry and the car will be better off for it.

I have many photos of back in the day and this is exactly how it used to be done, up until 30 sumpthin I would guess they had stations that were specifically set up this way within the dealers facility so that when you brought your car in for service they could offer this type of cleaning as well.

I am sure there were many private agencies that offered this type of service. Do you remember pits?

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Bret, I don't know where you are but I think it may have a bearing. Jason lives in sunny Florida (lucky chap! )where if you get everything wet it will soon dry out. By contrast I am writing from a part of the world where dampness is the general rule. I am sure what Jason has proposed is a good option for many people and like he says there are also other ways to degrease; but my money is on steam cleaning. You have the added benefits of hot steam under pressure, much less water sloshing around and also less kerosine needed. Everything dries out straight away and containment is easier. You don't need any lessons from me on the subject.

Have fun!

All the best,

Ray.

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Now THAT'S a ride to take to the local Walmart or perhaps the Dunkin'-Donut's drive thru. Bret, anyone that can build/restore a monster like that will have no problem restoring/conserving an old Dodge! Speaking here about steam cleaners, the "wheel-around" type steam cleaners that auto shops would have, are oil fired for the heat and steam, good pressure, will remove all gunk and old grease from axles, engines,etc... The only thing people seem to forget is to add a detergent to the water. Plain steam out of the wand won't do much but push the grease around all over the place and a big waste of time. I used to haul my early jukebox mechanisms over to a local auto machine shop that did the steam cleaning for me. Like I said, with the detergent, they came out like a jewel. I'd spray them down with WD40, or the like and set them in the summer sun for one afternoon. Final lube after mech went back into the cabinet. Anyway, I am always on the lookout for one of those steam cleaners at a bargain price. It would be ideal for undercarriages. setting a large shallow pan under the area that's being cleaned would catch most all the goop, I'm sure.

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Thanks! She was built in 1958. They started with a 1950 ford school bus frame and running gear. Had a code boiler built by a retired Nickel Plate Road boilermaker, added a 1905 twin cylinder American Derrick and Hoist engine which vial roller chain drives an extra rear diff that is hooked to the front of the original 4 speed tranny. I have been restoring it over the last couple years. It is a lot of fun, can reportedly make 30 mph ( not by me yet ) but it does take a couple hours between lighting the fire on a cold boiler and actually being able to drive somewhere. I am planning on driving it say to the local ice cream shoppe (3mi), and a couple local parades in town, and take it to some steam shows.

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