Jump to content

1955 Carter Carburetors


packick

Recommended Posts

I see in the literature that the 1955 Buicks with the larger engine used two different Carter carburetors, a 2197S or a 2358S. Is one preferable to the other? Why two choices? According to my Carter book, the 2358S requires a smaller spark plug gap than the 2197S but other than that I see no differences.

Just curious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I replaced my Rochester 4v with a Carter 4v.

I didn't know there are two choices of Carters. ....

I'll have to check what plugs I'm running

(And which Carter carb)

For '55 Stromberg carb was used , too. Does they run yet another plug?

Sent from my BlackBerry 9370 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A 2197S is what I have in mine too.

I found the reference to the 2358S being another carburetor is two places: a Carter carburetor book that covers all years from 1936 through at least the 50s; and this site Buick Carburetor Parts 1935-1960 - The Carburetor Doctor. I don't know what their information comes from but what they list agrees with the Carter manual.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 2358s was a very late introduction, and superceded the 2197s.

Main metering, power, and WOT circuits were left pretty much the same.

The choke circuit was "tweaked" in the 2358s.

The idle circuit in the 2358s was significantly modified.

While I do not have a letter from Carter stating such, my GUESS would be the 2358s was released to address idle issues with the 2197s.

Jon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Jon.

By the way, what kind of idling problems were experienced with the 2197S? The reason I ask is that I can't get my '55 Century to idle very smoothly. Is that just the "nature of the beast?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Jon.

By the way, what kind of idling problems were experienced with the 2197S? The reason I ask is that I can't get my '55 Century to idle very smoothly. Is that just the "nature of the beast?"

The fuel metering orifice in the idle jet of the 2358s is about 0.002 inch larger than the value used in the 2197s. And we suggest if using deathanol fuel that the idle orifice on any carburetor should be increased by 0.002 inch.

My guess would be that the 2197s would be lean on idle, particularly so if you have to burn corn squeezins.

Perhaps some Buick enthusiast that has a set of service bulletins might find the reason for the change to the 2358s; but with the large difference in the idle circuit, that would be my guess.

Jon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Jon.

By the way, what kind of idling problems were experienced with the 2197S? The reason I ask is that I can't get my '55 Century to idle very smoothly. Is that just the "nature of the beast?"

All four of mine with the 2197s idle fine, with only one having an occasional off-idle stumble (E-10). Check for vacuum leaks, especially at the fuel pump, check the ignition completely, then check compression.

Willie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Willie. On Monday a friend of mine who knows carburetors is coming over to help debug mine. As the engine is newly rebuilt, I am pretty sure it is not compression, and all of the ignition is new, but we will check all vacuum lines. I think it something that needs tweaking in the carburetor itself (e.g., accelerator pump, metering rods, float level, etc.). The book calls for 5-degrees timing, but with ethanol fuel nowadays, what do you set your timing at?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Joe, most of mine are set a 7* btdc. With a new engine, there is a possibility of sticking valves in too tight guides. Describe what the engine is doing at idle (car shake, tone of exhaust, driveability). Recheck all of that new ignition: dwell (at idle and when revved), timing, wire resistance ( if not using real wire core ), spark plugs (the original AC-44 are not readily available and parts stores try to substitute AC-R43, which for me fouled in 20 miles. I use Autolite 75 (non- resistor) or 85 (resistor version) with no issues.

Willie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Willie:

Right now it is idling a bit rough and needs to idle very fast in Neutral so that it won't die in Drive. We have played with the mixture screws but it still is not what I like. It also has a flat spot when easing on the accelerator pedal from a dead stop, and surges a bit when driving with a light depression of the accelerator pedal (e.g., going down a slight hill). But on the open road it runs great.

Let my friend and I play with it on Monday and I will report back to you our results. Thanks for the help. Stay tuned.

Edited by packick (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Old Tank et. al.

Yesterday we determined that the problem was the carburetor itself. So we pulled it off the car and checked the specifications. Turns out the floats were a bit off, the accelerator pump was way off, and the metering rods were off. Other than that . . .

So much for a professional rebuild. We also changed the ballast resistor on the firewall since mine was original and my friend said that in his past experience those could, with age, also cause the car to miss. The car now runs smoothly, better than it ever has. There is not much difference between the idle RPMs and the Drive RPMs. The car seems to have much more power now.

The only quirk we noticed is that there is not much of a drop in RPMs when fiddling with the mixture screws. There is some, but not much.

Thanks for all of the advice and council.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...