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Taylormade

Rubber Gearshift Surround

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I was worried you might damage it taking it off.
It's actually pretty low-risk. Take out 5 screws and it slides right up and off.

I've had it off before to clean up the battery ground cable connection to the transmission housing, and clean and lube the shifter link rods.

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As far as dies go ,if you have a trade school located close by,one that has a computerated machining class, they like to take on "real life" projects for practice at a considerable savings. If it fastens into a wooden floorboard ,I'd take a real good second look at Steele no. 40-0049-88 - '32 ply.PB pad. Measures 6-1/8 x 10-9/16 in., center gearshift hole but has clipped top corners. I know it's just close but might save alot of expense and only the experts are going to notice!

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As far as dies go ,if you have a trade school located close by,one that has a computerated machining class, they like to take on "real life" projects for practice at a considerable savings. If it fastens into a wooden floorboard ,I'd take a real good second look at Steele no. 40-0049-88 - '32 ply.PB pad. Measures 6-1/8 x 10-9/16 in., center gearshift hole but has clipped top corners. I know it's just close but might save alot of expense and only the experts are going to notice!

I may be forced to cave and get the Steele item, but not before I give this a try. Thankfully, the simple shape of the DL pad will make things much easier.

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Judging from the bag behind it this is a Steele reproduction piece. From that standpoint, he's not really gouging as Steele wants $148.80 for the piece. Either way, it's not a bargin. The sad reality is between the cost of the rubber, the mold-making materials and restoring or remaking the original for the mold, you're going to spend a lot more than that to make one. I enjoy figuring things out, but it doesn't always translate into saving money. If I had a nice CNC mill, I could machine the mold rather easily, but to hire a machinist to do it would cost a fortune. I have made similar pieces before using plexiglass and styrene strips. It didn't cost much, but the time involved was ridiculous. It was fun, so I didn't mind.

Things have changed, and there's no going back. When I bought my 32 for $400, I never thought I'd see the day when a beat-up fender for the car would cost twice what I originally paid for it. A gallon of paint that used to be $35.00 is now over a thousand! Any restoration worth its salt these days isn't going to come cheap even if you do most of the work yourself. I don't like it any more than you do, but that's the way it is.

Ok than the seller is doing a good thing, still waay to high though in my opinion but considering the amount of these that Steels sells ( prob. very little than I guess they are not exactly getting rich either off of them.

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Here are some pics of my '32s shifter/hand brake floor pad...part number 360081.

As you can see, it's not flat anymore, and the rubber is brittle, so trying to mold off it would be problematic.

I can work up a plan with dimensions, if that would help?

I would have sworn I had seen that pad before but it is listed 4 times within the parts book and all 4 pages it appears only under DL. How about the pedals pad, I guess I am not even sure that is needed.

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I may be forced to cave and get the Steele item, but not before I give this a try. Thankfully, the simple shape of the DL pad will make things much easier.

Have you considered making a wooden mold, if you have access to a router than this might be your easiest route, I know you want the steel insert but it really is not necessary, have you ever played around with purchasing some thick rubber and setting up a guide for your router with a good sharp blade and high enough speed and moving the router VERY slowly you might be shocked at how nice of a job that does as well.

This has been something I have done myself in passing at one point as I myself was experimenting with a rubber floormat idea, crazy as it sounds try it and tell me it dosent work, you will not be able to.

I have a clear idea on how this might work for you and let me know if you would like to hear more.

BTW I found it interesting that the rear rubber floormat in DL was part # 360080....I think rear, maybe front.

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Here are DA in case you are curious, much closer than the Plymouth pad

360081 does not show up in my Plymouth parts books BTW

post-48869-143141871084_thumb.jpg

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)

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I wondered if draft pads were found on export cars like mine? Or maybe the body was originally furnished with one and it has got lost. On my car this area has been re-carpeted and the trimmer has skillfully created leather boots for the handbrake and gear lever and incorporated them into the carpet with leather edg'ing.

Ray.

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Good question Ray, does the parts book give any indication? Prob. not. I would say off the cuff that your car would not have originally had them since it is a Richards body if I am not mistaken.

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Jason, at this point in time I do not know if my Body was built by Richards or if it is one by Holden; or indeed some other establishment. All I have is the dealer's plate on the toe board which is enstamped: Standardised Motors Ltd Sydney.

It would be rewarding to establish at least who the coachbuilder was. What I can say is that the body has rather attractive lines if that helps? I doubt that the interior can give many clues as the upholstery has been replaced. (Not withstanding, it has fine blue leather throughout with matching carpets and looks great!).

It may be that draft pads were introduced slightly later; I just don't know.

Ray.

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Here's a terrible screen shot of some photo I found online showing the surround mounted to the floor. Does this thing have a boot around the gear shift tower, or does the tower just poke through the draft seal, and there is no boot?

post-86486-143141871197_thumb.jpg

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Jason, at this point in time I do not know if my Body was built by Richards or if it is one by Holden; or indeed some other establishment. All I have is the dealer's plate on the toe board which is enstamped: Standardised Motors Ltd Sydney.

It would be rewarding to establish at least who the coachbuilder was. What I can say is that the body has rather attractive lines if that helps? I doubt that the interior can give many clues as the upholstery has been replaced. (Not withstanding, it has fine blue leather throughout with matching carpets and looks great!).

It may be that draft pads were introduced slightly later; I just don't know.

Ray.

I am sorry Ray, it is hard to remember the particular details of everyones car, your car is a 25 ( ? ) If that is the case than you are correct I believe in that they were introduced later, possibly with the intro of the 6 cyl cars in 27 but without doing some re-search than that is off the cuff.

I do remember that you have a very attractive Dodge and I would also be proud to own it.

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Here's a terrible screen shot of some photo I found online showing the surround mounted to the floor. Does this thing have a boot around the gear shift tower, or does the tower just poke through the draft seal, and there is no boot?

Its funny that you mention that, I click on the picture and it does not expand, are you able to make it so that it can be en-larged or can you send it to my e-mail so I can en-large it and post it?

I found this ring which appears absolutely correct/ a perfect mate for my own rubber within a very original DA and yet I have yet to find a part number or any indication within a parts book. I also found what I believe is the boot that you mention ( different car and cannot remember the story behind that particular car but it is a perfect fit for the ring identical in diamater.

However I know the boot cannot be correct because the DA has originally a nickel plated escutcheon or trim piece that would not have been originally covered up with anything, advertising for the car even mentioned this specific trim, does the DL originally have this, it is impossible to tell from the picture above, in daphnes picture it is also difficult to tell

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Edited by 1930 (see edit history)

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Thanks for your comments, Jason. My car is '26 but a '27 series with the smooth 5 bearing crank engine and we have a real love/hate relationship!!!

Now that I have sorted out most of the problems it is much, much more love and only a little bit of hate - like the other day when it took 2 hours just to remove the toe board!!. I have redesigned it so that it now only takes 2 minutes.... Now I love it again!! Hey Ho.

Ray.

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I think I have come up with an innovative way to reproduce the pad and use that prototype for the mold. It may take a week or two, but I'll post pictures if and when I get it done. I plan to use Devcon 94 urethane rubber, as I have in the past, to make the final piece. With Phil's photos and measurements I have all the information I need. I just have to order some inexpensive materials and I'm ready to go.

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Here are some additional pics that will answer some questions and clarify the details.

The two shots showing the shifter pad in place and missing show the hole that the pad covers. It's large enough that you can see why they included the metal sheet in the pad. Without it I would think that rubber material alone would, over time, sink down into the hole enough to cause a depression in the pad, or even allow something sharp to poke through (a high heel?!)

You'll also see that there is no rubber boot covering the lower end of the shift lever assembly...just a larger metal housing, but there IS a rubber seal between the housing and the thin upper part of the shift lever.

The shot with the mirror shows that the side of the hand brake lever towards the front of the car has an open channel. If you then look at the close up shot of the pad you'll see that the pad has a "tab" that fits into the handle channel!

Another example of the attention to details by those DB engineers!

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Edited by Phil 32DL6 (see edit history)

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Thanks, Phil. This is another example of why it is so important to have an original car we can reference for details like this.

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I would tend to believe that the "tab" was not purposely cut for the handbrake handle, but was cut down or mashed in due to the pushing the handle forward against the rubber pad. It's just that I have never seen one with a "tab" and believe me when I say that I have seen quite a few of them.

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Here are some additional pics that will answer some questions and clarify the details.

The two shots showing the shifter pad in place and missing show the hole that the pad covers. It's large enough that you can see why they included the metal sheet in the pad. Without it I would think that rubber material alone would, over time, sink down into the hole enough to cause a depression in the pad, or even allow something sharp to poke through (a high heel?!)

You'll also see that there is no rubber boot covering the lower end of the shift lever assembly...just a larger metal housing, but there IS a rubber seal between the housing and the thin upper part of the shift lever.

The shot with the mirror shows that the side of the hand brake lever towards the front of the car has an open channel. If you then look at the close up shot of the pad you'll see that the pad has a "tab" that fits into the handle channel!

Another example of the attention to details by those DB engineers!

Better pictures, yes I can see what you mean, it is quite a bit wider than my own and I bet that the heat over the years would cause it to droop if it not for the metal reinf. Do you have a similar pad for your pedals, I am assuming you do and is that the very corner of it that I see in your pictures, might be the accelerator pedal I guess.

I see the tab and makes sense that it fits the slot in the hand brake lever, I am just curious if that portion is re-enforced as well, I guess I should assume not.

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)

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I think I have come up with an innovative way to reproduce the pad and use that prototype for the mold. It may take a week or two, but I'll post pictures if and when I get it done. I plan to use Devcon 94 urethane rubber, as I have in the past, to make the final piece. With Phil's photos and measurements I have all the information I need. I just have to order some inexpensive materials and I'm ready to go.

Let me know if you still are in need of that packet, I was planning on digging for it this weekend

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Let me know if you still are in need of that packet, I was planning on digging for it this weekend

Would love to have it, thanks.

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The pad sits on a steel plate, so it will have to be removed to see the number.

I apologize for speculating that there was a steel plate beneath the pad on the '32. I thought it closer resembled the '31.

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I would tend to believe that the "tab" was not purposely cut for the handbrake handle, but was cut down or mashed in due to the pushing the handle forward against the rubber pad. It's just that I have never seen one with a "tab" and believe me when I say that I have seen quite a few of them.
John's comments sent me back to have another look, and John seems to be right about that "tab." I also have some other comments to make...after I do a bit of Photoshopping later. Edited by Phil 32DL6 (see edit history)

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So after doing some further poking, prodding, flexing and soul searching today here's what I've concluded (see attached image). It appears that the opening for the hand brake shifter lever was originally created by two drilled holes with a slit between them. When the rubber was new and flexible, it was simply forced over the head of the hand brake and molded itself to the bottom of the lever. Over time as the hand brake was applied and the rubber became less flexible, the slit opened and took on the shape of the path of the lever's travel. As John pointed out, what looks like an intentionally designed "tab" is how the mat was shaped and stayed as the rubber became inflexible.

By carefully flexing the mat, I'm also now of the opinion that the metal sheet does not completely fill the mat. The center part is more flexible than the outer perimeter. I've colored the entire mat a bright pink color, then overlaid the metal core shape in blue giving it a purple color. The shape of the inner edge of the metal is a guess since I couldn't feel the exact edge of the metal. Seems the metal frame kept the overall shape of the mat, reinforced the screw holes, but didn't provide support for the mat over the hole in the floor. Probably they found that the metal interfered in the areas where the rubber mat needed to remain as flexible as possible so it could move with the levers in multiple directions.

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If you had access to a fairly strong magnet (one of those rare earth type), you might be able to pin point the edge of the metal a bit better.

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