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Our continued...slow...progress!


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The engine paint on my 32 DL was a gray-green also. There was a nice sample on the top of the bellhousing that escaped the elements and the sun. It looks close to your color, maybe not quite as green, but it's hard to tell from photographs as the color temperature of the light can cause the photo to be off-color. Did you have your engine paint mixed, or was it from a rattle can? Either way, it looks great. I'm just getting ready to clean and paint my engine and I hope it turns out half as good!

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Thanks guys! It has been a while!

It's been slow because of being too damn cold to work out in the garage, Doug!! I do have some rubber door pieces that we're going to ship over to you to see if you can help with them. I should probably get off our butts and do that!! lol

Ian....I hope you got the pictures I sent to you! Let me know if you have any problems with them!

Taylormade....The engine paint was rattle can that we purchased from Romar. I believe Dennis used an epoxy primer first, but he'll have to verify that.

Have a great day guys!

Shannon

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WHY??

Since I painted the block and head separately, that left the head nuts unpainted and rusty, and if painted, no chance of getting them torqued without wrecking the paint... So I decided to try heating them with a propane torch and dunking them in motor oil until blackened. I think they look good, We'll see how they hold out over time- I plan to use this technique for some more fasteners in the next few days...I hope they don't turn rusty right away!:confused:

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Dennis, not sure if you plan to show in AACA? BUT they seem to think the head nuts should NOT be painted as if the engine was painted before it was assembled. I personally find this hard to believe but so far haven't found photo evidence. My twisted logic would say the engine was completely assembled and then painted.

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Dennis, not sure if you plan to show in AACA? BUT they seem to think the head nuts should NOT be painted as if the engine was painted before it was assembled. I personally find this hard to believe but so far haven't found photo evidence. My twisted logic would say the engine was completely assembled and then painted.

I agree. I cannot imagine the production line stopping to assemble the head/engine or taping it off to paint and then assemble.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I agree. I cannot imagine the production line stopping to assemble the head/engine or taping it off to paint and then assemble.

So do I.

I am informed by our Dodge 8 expert (DC8Dave) that the engine was assembled before painting the same colour all over, including valve covers, core plugs, oil filler tube, thermostat housing, sump and water pump. The idea was to get it painted with minimum cost, hence a minimum of fooling around with masking etc.. This way they would only mask the manifold and flywheel housing mating surfaces, the distributor surface and the water pump shaft and gland nut. One thing I am uncertain of is the air silencer bracket that is attached under a head nut. Apparently it was black so mounting it after engine painting would damage the paint on the nut. So what did they do - mask it as well, not worry about over-spray, fix the nuts that were damaged or not?

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  • 2 weeks later...

I was tempted to start a new post titled "NOW we're getting somewhere!" but decided to keep it all in one long post, like Ian-..lol Been busy with some detail work that takes a lot of time, but a couple things made a big difference lately.. Here are some before and after pics..

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I found it cool to uncover the green under the carriage bolt on the front bumper brackets...proves they are original and they were painted in the center section..

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Dennis, with your car in as good of condition when you started and your pictures it will be a big help to other owners. It is very good to document details like you are doing. BUT it still falls into the statement that DB never built two cars alike. I am really impressed with your work.

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Thanks, Doug, The rubber parts are working out great, I just came back inside from installing the rest of the door bumpers and it's nice to hear the proper noise when I close the doors! Even though it may not be correct to original, I like how the fastener blackening looks...(I think some of these items should have been painted body color)

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It's all looking great. Was particularly interested in the windscreen as I am just doing my DA at the moment, looks similar if not identical. What did you use to seal the windscreen glass into the frame?

John

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I was going to use a strip of thick black felt like it had from the factory, but it turned out the new safety glass is thicker, so I took the advice of the guy who cut the glass for me and just used black silicone. I struggled with getting it to look right around the edges, and still may run a tiny bead around the outside in an attempt to tidy it up- I did the same with the back glass...To me it seemed like the felt was just inviting water in to rust the frame-

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Not sure if this helps but the guy who made my glass said don't use silicone, use polyeurathane instead. It has better weathering properties. I've used this to hold the glass into their runners, sealing the rubbers and he also made a complete rubber for the wind out window from this stuff.

Just a thought.

Cheers

Ian

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Hi! Looking for suggestions on this little detail, hoping some of you have dealt with these moldings on past restorations... These are the plated moldings that go around the cowl and along the bottom of the body. They will polish up somewhat, but are pitted and rusty. The debate is whether to re-plate or replace them..In John Bittence's book says you can use new stainless moldings sold by Max Merritt, but it says to fill with "low melt alloy" to get it to bend to the proper contour, which sounds like a real mess...My original ones are kind of bent up, I'm afraid those little defects will really show up when chrome plated...Any thoughts or ideas? Thanks, Dennis

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  • 1 month later...

Well...The good news is tonight we had the engine running (a little) and it sounded pretty good, but the bad new is it has a couple oil leaks...Anybody know what these little holes are all about and are they supposed to be plugged with something?   2 of them are easy to get to, and one behind the generator that's not.  All 3 had this little, slow stream of oil coming out while it was running...We couldn't run it long since there is no cooling system whatsoever yet.  Other progress lately has been limited to receiving things like glass, wiring harness, and of course getting the timing etc. situated....It was good to hear it fire up, but will take some more tuning to get it to idle...post-139751-0-29262300-1432003829_thumb.

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I am not familiar with that engine, but if the oil is under pressure they are probably cleanouts of some sort on an oil galley. Maybe you could hook up a pressure gauge in one of them.

They look like they may be related to the camshaft.

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You do ask some interesting questions!! I have three DA engines here, two do NOT have the tapped holes, one does. It appears that they go into the area where the intermediate camshaft bearings are located. They are also NOT shown in my owners manual. The engine that has them is in the DA that I am restoring, I have yet to run that engine, but it has two metal thread screws in those holes. Had never thought about this before. Do they go in and prevent the intermediate camshaft bearings from turning? Probably not, but do not understand why all my engines are not the same. Sorry, but I do not have an answer really.

John

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Jesse's comments prompted me to have a better look at the two engines that I had previously said had no plugs and with a proper cleanup, they do indeed have little brass plugs, installed flush with the block. They were only visible when I cleaned off the paint. As my one engine that has metal thread screws (1/4 inch) inserted in the holes has been reconditioned, I now believe that the brass plugs were replaced with the screws during that process. It leads me to believe that they were removed to possibly clean out the oil galleries to the camshaft intermediate bearings. If I can shift enough junk to gain access to one of the engines I will try to remove the camshaft to check. 

John

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Pulled the camshaft out of one of my engines this morning. There is an oil hole in the camshaft bearing that lines up with the brass plugs (or in the case of my other engine, the 1/4 inch bolts that replace the brass plugs). I assume that during manufacture, the hole would have been drilled in the side of the engine block, through where the camshaft bearing would be, and into the oil gallery. This supplies oil to the camshaft bearing. Hopefully you can see enough in my photos to show this, it is pretty awkward to photograph. The actual camshaft bearing that is pressed into the journal has only one oil hole, the one shown, which is opposite side of the journal to the brass plug hole. The brass plug hole is blocked off by the bearing itself, although there is probably a groove around the journal to allow some oil to get around to dribble out the hole as you described. Hope this and the photos make sense. To go any further I would need to remove the bearing and maybe drill out the plug, which I would prefer not to do at this stage, but can do if you need me to.

John

 

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If it were me I would get some lead shot and hammer it in there.

The other two options that may work as well. Hammering some brass in there or take the cam out and tap the holes for plugs.

The depth of these holes to the bearing has not been discussed. Although in Bullfrogs pic it appears the there is a web that one may be able to tap with a bottom tap allowing a plug. A pipe tap and plug would be the best fix.

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)
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Thank you guys for all your research and input...I have been working on other things on the car and haven't been back to the forum in a few days.  I did email John Bittence, He said the brass plugs are to hold the bearings in place.  I also talked to the engine re-builder, and he was confident that the plugs are firmly holding the cam bearings in place.  He suggested doing whatever it takes to just seal them up, and should be ok.  I was thinking brass, but I like the lead shot idea also...Epoxy was also suggested.  If I knew for sure that area was thick enough, I'd drill it out and tap for a bolt, But I think I will save that for a last resort-  Lately been working on fire wall related items, including vacuum tank, wiring, and made a new panel for inside the fire wall.  Yes, I did use epoxy primer, and Pake's showed "bake & blast" on the invoice-post-139751-0-49647900-1432781675_thumb.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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