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Lebowski

What's wrong with this photo?

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First take a close look at the photo and see if you can determine if there's anything unusual regarding either the 1915 Mercer or the dog....

According to The Old Motor | Old car photos , Old Cars For sale, Classic Cars, antique cars the dog has "three eyes and two noses." I showed it to my wife and she thinks it's fake. What do you guys think? :confused: :confused: :confused:

post-59416-143141850583_thumb.jpg

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1910_Anon

Spot on!

Exactly why in old racing photos the cars are stretched out diagonally.

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What? You haven't ever seen a three eyed two nosed dog before? :P

I saw a video of a live snake with two heads once so anything is possible I guess....

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The dog turned his head as the photo was snapped to see a Stutz Bearcat go tearing by............ you gotta be nuts to drive a Stutz, but there is nothing worser than a Mercer. :rolleyes: The Mercer is a better car, but my heart is with Stutz. Ed

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What is wrong with the picture you ask? There's no girls in bikinis around the Mercer... :P Dandy Dave!

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Exactly why in old racing photos the cars are stretched out diagonally.

LAYDEN, you are a god! For my entirely life, I've been wondering why that distorted effect appeared in old racing photographs, pre-PhotoShop. Artist Peter Helck (who owned a famous racing Mercer) made a career out of mimicking this illusion in his terrific paintings. I still don't quite understand the physics - actually, I never understood Physics as a student - you've given me a glimmer of realization as to why those great skinny wheels manage to bend into ellipses at speed and then return to circles at rest.

"Fairmont Park" by Peter Helck

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Edited by Rob McDonald (see edit history)

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Rob,

1910_Anon did a good technical description and it is a continuous process but maybe it would help to think of it this way:

The picture is taken in thin horizontal strips starting at the bottom, next strip taken just above it and the subject has moved just a bit, another strip and more movement, all the way to the top. With the top having been taken later in time than the bottom a fast moving object gets distorted with the top being stretched "forward" in the direction of motion. Hope this is clearer than mud!

We will let others explain why a cars horn sounds higher pitched when the car is coming toward you then changes to normal as the car passes then becomes lower as the car goes away. Ah.. the mysteries of life...

What is really wrong with the picture is that the Mercer is not in my garage.

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That... and the fact that shutters opened horizontally on those old cameras. Today they open vertically.

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Mercer.jpg

Just as folks here have mentioned the photo is the real thing and not faked, the dog moved it's head. The Mercer Raceabout is

the real thing also and one of the house favorites at The Old Motor. Stop by and learn all about the legendary Mercer Raceabout.

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+1 to Ed's sentiments on Mercers vs. Stutz. (both fantastic cars)

Pic makes me think of my grandfather's college graduation photo, from the early 20s. He and a couple other fraternity brothers are in it twice due to the fact they actually had to take three pictures to get the panoramic view. They ran from one end to the other in time to get in the last shot!! :D

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There was a panoram camera that had a swinging lenz,,,,AND a air FAN to control the speed

There were different size fans in a pocket in the camera,,

It WAS possible to run from one side of the pic/field and appear on the other side,,

running behind the crowd,,The lenz swing on large fan was probably 20 seconds

Camera advertised in Camera Craft,,1912 issues,,,At one time I had one,,Cheers,,Ben

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+1 to Ed's sentiments on Mercers vs. Stutz. (both fantastic cars)

Stutz1.jpg

Here is a neat Stutz Bearcat photo for you Stutz fans, that was taken in Texas the Jim Hogg County Courthouse in

Hebbronville. As always all the details can be found on The Old Motor.

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There was a panoram camera that had a swinging lenz,,,,AND a air FAN to control the speed

There were different size fans in a pocket in the camera,,

It WAS possible to run from one side of the pic/field and appear on the other side,,

running behind the crowd,,The lenz swing on large fan was probably 20 seconds

Camera advertised in Camera Craft,,1912 issues,,,At one time I had one,,Cheers,,Ben

Indeed. If you are ever at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum, check out the group photos on the back (east I think) wall. The photographer had some fun making those shots.

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Steve,

Right on.

My Dad's U of MN. graduation picture has the same person on each end of the photo. He just stepped down, ran behind the group, and came up on the other end just in time for the panoramic shot. That was a popular prank back in the day.

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Very cool Caddyshack. I now need to get off my a** and restore the picture frame for that photo, which I have owned for the last 30 years, from Trinity College in Hartford, CT circa 1922, I believe -before I hand it on down. Unfortunately no one he ever spoke of had a Mercer or a Stutz, though...

FANTASTIC Bearcat shot - I wouldn't mess with those guys from Jim Hogg County!!

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Ben,

How about this one!

[ATTACH=CONFIG]188556[/ATTACH]

Cute little Saxon!

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